Writers Of The American West

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American West

Author : Loren D. Estleman
ISBN : 1429911778
Genre : Fiction
File Size : 72.89 MB
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Once, there was a world where the heroes were defined by their white clothing and the bad guys always wore black. The town sheriff always gunned down the wild gunslinger while the lady in distress cowered. The Indian was to be feared, not understood, and the white man always saved the day. This was the traditional Western. But times change, as did the Western. The evolving Western is told from the point of view of blacks, Native Americans, Hispanics, Asians, Jews, Gentiles, Mormons, Catholics, women, and men. It is about America; it is about life. Whether a story's central element is a hangman or a midwife, a piano or a cowboy who hates tomatoes, you may be certain of one thing, if the tale reflects an expanding continent, it reflects the American West. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.
Category: Fiction

A Literary History Of The American West

Author : Western Literature Association (U.S.)
ISBN : 087565021X
Genre : Literary Criticism
File Size : 72.90 MB
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Literary histories, of course, do not have a reason for being unless there exists the literature itself. This volume, perhaps more than others of its kind, is an expression of appreciation for the talented and dedicated literary artists who ignored the odds, avoided temptations to write for popularity or prestige, and chose to write honestly about the American West, believing that experiences long knowns to be of historical importance are also experiences that need and deserve a literature of importance.
Category: Literary Criticism

Women Writers Of The American West 1833 1927

Author : Nina Baym
ISBN : 9780252078842
Genre : History
File Size : 47.11 MB
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Women Writers of the American West, 1833–1927 recovers the names and works of hundreds of women who wrote about the American West during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, some of them long forgotten and others better known novelists, poets, memoirists, and historians such as Willa Cather and Mary Austin Holley. Nina Baym mined literary and cultural histories, anthologies, scholarly essays, catalogs, advertisements, and online resources to debunk critical assumptions that women did not publish about the West as much as they did about other regions. Elucidating a substantial body of nearly 650 books of all kinds by more than 300 writers, Baym reveals how the authors showed women making lives for themselves in the West, how they represented the diverse region, and how they represented themselves. Baym accounts for a wide range of genres and geographies, affirming that the literature of the West was always more than cowboy tales and dime novels. Nor did the West consist of a single landscape, as women living in the expanses of Texas saw a different world from that seen by women in gold rush California. Although many women writers of the American West accepted domestic agendas crucial to the development of families, farms, and businesses, they also found ways to be forceful agents of change, whether by taking on political positions, deriding male arrogance, or, as their voluminous published works show, speaking out when they were expected to be silent.
Category: History

Marking The Sparrow S Fall

Author : Wallace Earle Stegner
ISBN : 0805044647
Genre : Literary Collections
File Size : 81.8 MB
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Presents a collection of essays, including fifteen published for the first time, along with the novella "Genesis"
Category: Literary Collections

Wallace Stegner And The American West

Author : Philip L. Fradkin
ISBN : UOM:39015073669916
Genre : Authors, American
File Size : 83.56 MB
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Wallace Stegner was the premier chronicler of the twentieth-century western American experience, and his novels brought the life and landscapes of the West to national and international attention. Here, biographer Fradkin goes beyond Stegner's iconic literary status to give us, as well, the influential teacher and visionary conservationist, the man for whom the preservation and integrity of place was as important as his ability to render its qualities and character in his brilliantly crafted fiction and nonfiction. His writings on the importance of establishing national parks and wilderness areas--not only for the preservation of untouched landscape but also for the enrichment of the human spirit--played a key role in the passage of historic legislation and comprise some of the most beautiful words ever written about the natural world.--From publisher description.
Category: Authors, American

Twentieth Century American Western Writers

Author : Richard H. Cracroft
ISBN : 0787631000
Genre : Reference
File Size : 34.92 MB
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Essays on twentieth-century American western writers. Discusses American consciousness of the West shaped by awareness of its history, and the increasing importance of the West. Western writers began to celebrate the rich diversity of the region. Native American and other minority writers began to emerge, as did Western poetry, short stories and black humor.
Category: Reference

Mary Austin And The American West

Author : Susan Goodman
ISBN : 0520942264
Genre : History
File Size : 45.27 MB
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Mary Austin (1868-1934)—eccentric, independent, and unstoppable—was twenty years old when her mother moved the family west. Austin's first look at her new home, glimpsed from California's Tejon Pass, reset the course of her life, "changed her horizons and marked the beginning of her understanding, not only about who she was, but where she needed to be." At a time when Frederick Jackson Turner had announced the closing of the frontier, Mary Austin became the voice of the American West. In 1903, she published her first book, The Land of Little Rain, a wholly original look at the West's desert and its ethnically diverse peoples. Defined in a sense by the places she lived, Austin also defined the places themselves, whether Bishop, in the Sierra Nevada, Carmel, with its itinerant community of western writers, or Santa Fe, where she lived the last ten years of her life. By the time of her death in 1934, Austin had published over thirty books and counted as friends the leading literary and artistic lights of her day. In this rich new biography, Susan Goodman and Carl Dawson explore Austin's life and achievement with unprecedented resonance, depth, and understanding. By focusing on one extraordinary woman's life, Mary Austin and the American West tells the larger story of the emerging importance of California and the Southwest to the American consciousness.
Category: History

A History Of Western American Literature

Author : Susan Kollin
ISBN : 9781316033463
Genre : Literary Criticism
File Size : 72.18 MB
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The American West is a complex region that has inspired generations of writers and artists. Often portrayed as a quintessential landscape that symbolizes promise and progress for a developing nation, the American West is also a diverse space that has experienced conflicting and competing hopes and expectations. While it is frequently imagined as a place enabling dreams of new beginnings for settler communities, it is likewise home to long-standing indigenous populations as well as many other ethnic and racial groups who have often produced different visions of the land. This History encompasses the intricacy of Western American literature by exploring myriad genres and cultural movements, from ecocriticism, settler colonial studies and transnational theory, to race, ethnic, gender and sexuality studies. Written by a host of leading historians and literary critics, this book offers readers insight into the West as a site that sustains canonical and emerging authors alike, and as a region that exceeds national boundaries in addressing long-standing global concerns and developments.
Category: Literary Criticism

Teaching Western American Literature

Author : Brady Harrison
ISBN : 9781496220387
Genre : Literary Criticism
File Size : 20.49 MB
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In this volume experienced and new college- and university-level teachers will find practical, adaptable strategies for designing or updating courses in western American literature and western studies. Teaching Western American Literature features the latest developments in western literary research and cultural studies as well as pedagogical best practices in course development. Contributors provide practical models and suggestions for courses and assignments while presenting concrete strategies for teaching works both inside and outside the canon. In addition, Brady Harrison and Randi Lynn Tanglen have assembled insights from pioneering western studies instructors with workable strategies and practical advice for translating this often complex material for classrooms from freshman writing courses to graduate seminars. Teaching Western American Literature reflects the cutting edge of western American literary study, featuring diverse approaches allied with women’s, gender, queer, environmental, disability, and Indigenous studies and providing instructors with entrée into classrooms of leading scholars in the field.
Category: Literary Criticism

Writers Of The American West

Author : John Stansfield
ISBN : UVA:X004553868
Genre : Education
File Size : 82.49 MB
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The diverse peoples, landscapes, and histories of Western North America come alive with these autobiographical excerpts, author profiles, and activities. Focusing on the childhood and young adult experience of 10 of the West's most intriguing writers, each chapter presents engrossing personal narrative, biographical sketches, a resource bibliography, and numerous learning activities. A bonus section features 20 other Western writers for further exploration.
Category: Education

Pre Nineteenth Century British Book Collectors And Bibliographers

Author : William Baker
ISBN : STANFORD:36105024866423
Genre : Reference
File Size : 32.73 MB
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Essays on British book collectors and bibliographers from the fourteenth through the eighteenth centuries. This period marked the growth of humanism and coincides with the early Renaissance, before the widespread establishment of print culture. Focuses on the historical evolution of a specific library, as well as a collecting family. Discusses the nature and variety of collecting as a cultural activity.
Category: Reference

The American West As Living Space

Author : Wallace Stegner
ISBN : 0472063758
Genre : Science
File Size : 63.18 MB
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A passionate work about the fragile and arid West that Stegner loves
Category: Science

Mark Twain And The American West

Author : Joseph L. Coulombe
ISBN : 0826263186
Genre : Fiction
File Size : 39.92 MB
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In Mark Twain and the American West, Joseph Coulombe explores how Mark Twain deliberately manipulated contemporary conceptions of the American West to create and then modify a public image that eventually won worldwide fame. He establishes the central role of the western region in the development of a persona that not only helped redefine American manhood and literary celebrity in the late nineteenth century, but also produced some of the most complex and challenging writings in the American canon.Coulombe sheds new light on previously underappreciated components of Twain's distinctly western persona. Gathering evidence from contemporary newspapers, letters, literature, and advice manuals, Coulombe shows how Twain's persona in the early 1860s as a hard-drinking, low-living straight-talker was an implicit response to western conventions of manhood. He then traces the author's movement toward a more sophisticated public image, arguing that Twain characterized language and authorship in the same manner that he described western men: direct, bold, physical, even violent. In this way, Twain capitalized upon common images of the West to create himself as a new sort of western outlaw--one who wrote.Coulombe outlines Twain's struggle to find the proper balance between changing cultural attitudes toward male respectability and rebellion and his own shifting perceptions of the East and the West. Focusing on the tension between these goals, Coulombe explores Twain's emergence as the moneyed and masculine man-of-letters, his treatment of American Indians in its relation to his depiction of Jim in Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, the enigmatic connection of Huck Finn to the natural world, and Twain's profound influence on Willa Cather's western novels.Mark Twain and the American West is sure to generate new interest and discussion about Mark Twain and his influence. By understanding how conventions of the region, conceptions of money and class, and constructions of manhood intersect with the creation of Twain's persona, Coulombe helps us better appreciate the writer's lasting effect on American thought and literature through the twentieth century and into the twenty-first.
Category: Fiction

Imagining The African American West

Author : Blake Allmendinger
ISBN : 9780803210677
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 67.39 MB
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The literature of the African American West is the last racial discourse of the region that remains unexplored. Blake Allmendinger addresses this void in literary and cultural studies with Imagining the African American West?the first comprehensive study of African American literature on the early frontier and in the modern urban American West. ø Allmendinger charts the terrain of African American literature in the West through his exploration of novels, histories, autobiographies, science fiction, mysteries, formula westerns, melodramas, experimental theater, and political essays, as well as rap music and film. He examines the histories of James P. Beckwourth and Oscar Micheaux; slavery, the Civil War, and the significance of the American frontier to blacks; and the Harlem Renaissance, the literature of urban unrest, rap music, black noir, and African American writers, including Toni Morrison and Walter Mosley. His study utilizes not only the works of well-known African American writers but also some obscure and neglected works, out-of-print books, and unpublished manuscripts in library archives. ø Much of the scholarly neglect of the ?Black West? can be blamed on how the American West has been imagined, constructed, and framed in scholarship to date. In his study, Allmendinger provides the appropriate theoretical, cultural, and historical contexts for understanding the literature and suggests new directions for the future of black western literature.
Category: Social Science

Regionalists On The Left

Author : Michael C. Steiner
ISBN : 9780806148953
Genre : History
File Size : 84.41 MB
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“Nothing is more anathema to a serious radical than regionalism,” Berkeley English professor Henry Nash Smith asserted in 1980. Although regionalism in the American West has often been characterized as an inherently conservative, backward-looking force, regionalist impulses have in fact taken various forms throughout U.S. history. The essays collected in Regionalists on the Left uncover the tradition of left-leaning western regionalism during the 1930s and 1940s. Editor Michael C. Steiner has assembled a group of distinguished scholars who explore the lives and works of sixteen progressive western intellectuals, authors, and artists, ranging from nationally prominent figures such as John Steinbeck and Carey McWilliams to equally influential, though less well known, figures such as Angie Debo and Américo Paredes. Although they never constituted a unified movement complete with manifestos or specific goals, the thinkers and leaders examined in this volume raised voices of protest against racial, environmental, and working-class injustices during the Depression era that reverberate in the twenty-first century. Sharing a deep affection for their native and adopted places within the West, these individuals felt a strong sense of avoidable and remediable wrong done to the land and the people who lived upon it, motivating them to seek the root causes of social problems and demand change. Regionalists on the Left shows also that this radical regionalism in the West often took urban, working-class, and multicultural forms. Other books have dealt with western regionalism in general, but this volume is unique in its focus on left-leaning regionalists, including such lesser-known writers as B. A. Botkin, Carlos Bulosan, Sanora Babb, and Joe Jones. Tracing the relationship between politics and place across the West, Regionalists on the Left highlights a significant but neglected strain of western thought and expression.
Category: History

The New American West In Literature And The Arts

Author : Amaia Ibarraran-Bigalondo
ISBN : 9781000092837
Genre : Literary Criticism
File Size : 88.99 MB
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The story of the American West is that of a journey. It is the story of a movement, of a geographical and human transition, of the delineation of a route that would soon become a rooted myth. The story of the American West has similarly journeyed across boundaries, in a two-way movement, sometimes feeding the idea of that myth, sometimes challenging it. This collection of essays relates to the notion of the traveling essence of the myth of the American West from different geographical and disciplinary standpoints. The volume originates in Europe, in Spain, where the myth traveled, was received, assimilated, and re-presented. It intends to travel back to the West, in a two-way cross-cultural journey, which will hopefully contribute to the delineation of the New—always self-renewing—American West. It includes the work of authors of both sides of the Atlantic ocean who propose a cross-cultural, transdisciplinary dialogue upon the idea, the geography and the representation of the American West.
Category: Literary Criticism

A Companion To The Literature And Culture Of The American West

Author : Nicolas S. Witschi
ISBN : 9781444396584
Genre : Literary Criticism
File Size : 21.40 MB
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A Companion to the Literature and Culture of the American West presents a series of essays that explore the historic and contemporary cultural expressions rooted in America's western states. Offers a comprehensive approach to the wide range of cultural expressions originating in the west Focuses on the intersections, complexities, and challenges found within and between the different historical and cultural groups that define the west's various distinctive regions Addresses traditionally familiar icons and ideas about the west (such as cowboys, wide-open spaces, and violence) and their intersections with urbanization and other regional complexities Features essays written by many of the leading scholars in western American cultural studies
Category: Literary Criticism

Wanted Dead Or Alive

Author : Richard Aquila
ISBN : 0252065271
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 89.56 MB
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Following Richard Aquila's introduction, which examines the birth and growth of the pop culture West in the context of American history, noted expects explore developments in popular western fiction, major forms of live western entertainment, trends in western movies and television shows, images of the West in popular music, and visual images of the West in popular art and advertising.
Category: Social Science