THE RISE OF THE US ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH MOVEMENT

Download The Rise Of The Us Environmental Health Movement ebook PDF or Read Online books in PDF, EPUB, and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to THE RISE OF THE US ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH MOVEMENT book pdf for free now.

The Rise Of The U S Environmental Health Movement

Author : Kate Davies
ISBN : 144222245X
Genre : Environmental health
File Size : 79.6 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 492
Read : 314

This is the first book to offer a comprehensive examination of the Environmental Health Movement, which unlike many parts of the environmental movement, focuses on ways toxic chemicals and other hazardous agents in the environmental effect human health and well-being.
Category: Environmental health

Environmental Policy And Public Health

Author : Barry L. Johnson
ISBN : 9781498799478
Genre : Law
File Size : 64.38 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 485
Read : 206

As with the first edition, this second edition describes how environmental health policies are developed, the statutes and other policies that have evolved to address public health concerns associated with specific environmental hazards, and the public health foundations of the policies. It lays out policies for what is considered the major environmental physical hazards to human health. Specifically, the authors describe hazards from air, water, food, hazardous substances, and wastes. To this list the authors have added the additional concerns from climate change, tobacco products, genetically-modified organisms, environment-related diseases, energy production, biodiversity and species endangerment, and the built environment. And as with the first edition, histories of policymaking for specific environmental hazards are portrayed. This edition differs from its antecedent in three significant themes. Global perspectives are added to chapters that describe specific environmental hazards, e.g., air pollution policies in China and India. Also there is the material on the consequences of environmental hazards on both human and ecosystem health. Additionally readers are provided with information about interventions that policymakers and individuals can consider in mitigating or preventing specific environmental hazards.
Category: Law

The Spirit Of New York

Author : Bruce W. Dearstyne
ISBN : 9781438456591
Genre : History
File Size : 41.82 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 496
Read : 332

Presents New York history in a fresh way through sixteen dramatic events. In this lively and engaging book, Bruce W. Dearstyne presents New York State history by exploring sixteen dramatic events. From the launch of the state government in April 1777 to the tragedy of September 11, 2001, these events altered the course of state and US history. Chapters describe great political changes, historical turning points, and struggles for social, racial, and environmental reform. The book includes daring acts of courage and against-the-odds stories of struggle and triumph. Dearstyne puts the fascinating people who made history at the center of the story, including John Jay, the lead writer of the first state constitution; Elizabeth Cady Stanton, the irrepressible crusader for women’s rights; Glenn Curtiss, New York’s aviation pioneer; and Robert Moses, controversial president of the 1964 New York World’s Fair. This book makes history come alive. The momentous events illustrate the “spirit” of New York—the elusive traits that make New York State unique and a leader among the fifty states—and the complexity of its history. “Bruce Dearstyne’s beautifully written and thoroughly researched biography of New York opens new vistas for understanding the enormous impact the state has had on American history writ large. With attention to and sensitivity toward geographical, ethnic, economic, and ecological diversity, the book offers an important new explanation of why New York has been able to meet so many of its challenges with dynamism and creativity. It also shows how ego and self-interest have sometimes gotten in the way, balancing the determined problem solving that is often seen as a hallmark of the state with a true account of rises and falls, booms and busts, and vision and drift that are equally a part of its spirit.” — Louise Mirrer, President and CEO, New-York Historical Society “Bruce Dearstyne brings a fine narrative style and superb storytelling to The Spirit of New York. Readers will learn about New York politics, the state’s role in racial conflict, recasting the role of women in New York, and far more. The book is about the people of New York responding individually and collectively to the opportunities, problems, and tragedies that have punctuated the history of the Empire State from its beginnings to the present.” — Warren Roberts, author of A Place in History: Albany in the Age of Revolution, 1775–1825 “This book offers a fascinating odyssey through New York’s past by using examples of its national leadership, ranging from the state’s early women’s rights movements to Jackie Robinson’s historic integration of major league baseball, and from aviation pioneer Glenn Curtis to the construction of a landmark superhighway, the New York State Thruway. Dearstyne presents fresh insight into several salient events that made New York the Empire State. In doing so, he comes as close to a recent general history of the state as currently exists.” — F. Daniel Larkin, State University of New York at Oneonta
Category: History

Handbook Of Political Citizenship And Social Movements

Author : Hein-Anton van der Heijden
ISBN : 9781781954706
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 70.73 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 462
Read : 991

øThis Handbook uniquely collates the results of several decades of academic research in these two important fields. The expert contributions successively address the different forms of political citizenship and current approaches and recent development
Category: Political Science

Intrinsic Hope

Author : Kate Davies
ISBN : 9781771422550
Genre : Self-Help
File Size : 71.35 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 517
Read : 224

Climate disruption. Growing social inequality. Pollution. We are living in an era of unprecedented crisis, resulting in widespread feelings of fear, despair, and grief. Now, more than ever, maintaining hope for the future is a monumental task Intrinsic Hope offers a powerful antidote to these feelings. It shows how conventional ideas of hope are rooted in the belief that life will conform to our wishes and how this leads to disappointment, despair, and a dismal view of the future. As an alternative, it offers 'intrinsic hope,' a powerful, liberating, and positive approach to life based on having a deep trust in whatever happens. The author, a hopeful survivor, shows how to cultivate intrinsic hope through practical tips and six mindful habits for living a positive, courageous life in these troubled times. Whether working directly on ecological or social issues or worried about children and grandchildren, this book is for everyone concerned about the future and looking for a deeper source of hope for a better world. Kate Davies MA, DPhil, has worked on environmental and social issues for her entire career. She is emeritus faculty at Antioch University, senior fellow at the Whidbey Institute and clinical associate professor in the University of Washington's School of Public Health. Her written work has been published in newspapers, magazines and journals and she is the author of The Rise of the U.S. Environmental Health Movement. Davies lives in Langley, WA.
Category: Self-Help

Crabgrass Crucible

Author : Christopher C. Sellers
ISBN : 9780807869901
Genre : History
File Size : 67.99 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 660
Read : 957

Although suburb-building created major environmental problems, Christopher Sellers demonstrates that the environmental movement originated within suburbs--not just in response to unchecked urban sprawl. Drawn to the countryside as early as the late nineteenth century, new suburbanites turned to taming the wildness of their surroundings. They cultivated a fondness for the natural world around them, and in the decades that followed, they became sensitized to potential threats. Sellers shows how the philosophy, science, and emotions that catalyzed the environmental movement sprang directly from suburbanites' lives and their ideas about nature, as well as the unique ecology of the neighborhoods in which they dwelt. Sellers focuses on the spreading edges of New York and Los Angeles over the middle of the twentieth century to create an intimate portrait of what it was like to live amid suburban nature. As suburbanites learned about their land, became aware of pollution, and saw the forests shrinking around them, the vulnerability of both their bodies and their homes became apparent. Worries crossed lines of class and race and necessitated new ways of thinking and acting, Sellers argues, concluding that suburb-dwellers, through the knowledge and politics they forged, deserve much of the credit for inventing modern environmentalism.
Category: History

Local Environmental Movements

Author : Pradyumna P. Karan
ISBN : 9780813138770
Genre : Science
File Size : 41.72 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 239
Read : 437

Increasing evidence of the irreparable damage humans have inflicted on the planet has caused many to adopt a defeatist attitude toward the future of the global environment. Local Environmental Movements: A Comparative Study of the United States and Japan analyzes how local groups in both Japan and the United States refuse to surrender the Earth to a depleted and polluted fate. Drawing on numerous case studies, scholars from around the world discuss efforts by grassroots organizations and movements to protect the environment and to preserve the landscapes they love and depend upon. The authors examine citizen campaigns protesting nuclear radiation and chemical weapons disposal. Other groups have organized to protect farmlands and urban landscapes to groups that organize to preserve steams, wildlife habitats, tidal flats, coral reefs, National Parks, and biodiversity. These small groups of determined citizens are occasionally successful, demonstrating the power of democracy against seemingly insurmountable odds. In other cases, the groups failed to bring about the desired change. This book explores the distinctive leaders, the relevant laws and regulations, local politics, and the historical and cultural contexts that influenced the goals and successes of the various groups. The contributors conclude that there is no one single environmental movement but many, and the volume emphasizes grassroots movements and advocacy groups that represent local constituencies. By studying these groups and their respective challenges, Local Environmental Movements highlights the common themes as well as the distinctive features of environmental advocates in the United States and Japan. Over decades, these groups' have nurtured environmental awareness and promoted the concept of sustainable development that respects the need for both environmental protection and cultural preservation.
Category: Science

Building American Public Health

Author : R. Lopez
ISBN : 9781137002440
Genre : History
File Size : 64.8 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 639
Read : 1203

This historical study looks at how reformers have used urban planning and architecture to improve the health of urban residents of the United States. It begins in the nineteenth century, when problems in rapidly urbanizing cities threatened to overwhelm cities, and then traces the development and impact of reform movements up through the First World War, including discussions of model tenements, the 'city beautiful' movement, tenement laws, and zoning and building codes. Midcentury design movements, such as new efforts to plan suburbs and Modernism, along with outlines of the impacts of public housing, highway building, and urban renewal, are the focus of the middle chapters of the book. The final third examines the revival of cities and the reconnection of public health with urban planning that occurred as the twentieth century ended.
Category: History

Capitalizing On Environmental Injustice

Author : Daniel Faber
ISBN : 0742533913
Genre : Business & Economics
File Size : 21.61 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 648
Read : 928

"Capitalizing on Environmental Injustice provides an overview of the achievements and challenges confronting the environmental justice movement. Pressured by increased international competition and the demand for higher profits, industrial and political leaders are working to weaken many of America's most essential environmental, occupational, and consumer protection laws. In addition, corporate-led globalization exports many ecological hazards abroad. The result is a deepening of the ecological crisis in both the United States and the Global South. However, not all people are impacted equally. In this process of capital restructuring, it is the most marginalized segments of society - poor people of color and the working class - that suffer the greatest force of corporate environmental abuses. Daniel Faber, an environmental sociologist, analyzes the global political and economic forces that create these environmental injustices. With a multi-disciplinary approach, Faber presents both broad overviews and powerful insider case studies, examining the connections between many different struggles for change."--BOOK JACKET.
Category: Business & Economics

From The Ground Up

Author : Luke W. Cole
ISBN : 9780814715369
Genre : Law
File Size : 76.57 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 494
Read : 237

Presents case studies of grassroots activism for environmental justice, highlighting struggles against environmental hazards, toxic waste dumps, and polluting factories which often impact low-income and minority communities.
Category: Law