THE PASSPORT IN AMERICA THE HISTORY OF A DOCUMENT

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The Passport In America

Author : Craig Robertson
ISBN : 9780199779895
Genre : History
File Size : 22.24 MB
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In today's world of constant identification checks, it's difficult to recall that there was ever a time when "proof of identity" was not a part of everyday life. And as anyone knows who has ever lost a passport, or let one expire on the eve of international travel, the passport has become an indispensable document. But how and why did this form of identification take on such a crucial role? In the first history of the passport in the United States, Craig Robertson offers an illuminating account of how this document, above all others, came to be considered a reliable answer to the question: who are you? Historically, the passport originated as an official letter of introduction addressed to foreign governments on behalf of American travelers, but as Robertson shows, it became entangled in contemporary negotiations over citizenship and other forms of identity documentation. Prior to World War I, passports were not required to cross American borders, and while some people struggled to understand how a passport could accurately identify a person, others took advantage of this new document to advance claims for citizenship. From the strategic use of passport applications by freed slaves and a campaign to allow married women to get passports in their maiden names, to the "passport nuisance" of the 1920s and the contested addition of photographs and other identification technologies on the passport, Robertson sheds new light on issues of individual and national identity in modern U.S. history. In this age of heightened security, especially at international borders, Robertson's The Passport in America provides anyone interested in questions of identification and surveillance with a richly detailed, and often surprising, history of this uniquely important document.
Category: History

Decolonization And The Cold War

Author : Leslie James
ISBN : 9781472571212
Genre : History
File Size : 79.2 MB
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The Cold War and decolonization transformed the twentieth century world. This volume brings together an international line-up of experts to explore how these transformations took place and expand on some of the latest threads of analysis to help inform our understanding of the links between the two phenomena. The book begins by exploring ideas of modernity, development, and economics as Cold War and postcolonial projects and goes on to look at the era's intellectual history and investigate how emerging forms of identity fought for supremacy. Finally, the contributors question ideas of sovereignty and state control that move beyond traditional Cold War narratives. Decolonization and the Cold War emphasizes new approaches by drawing on various methodologies, regions, themes, and interdisciplinary work, to shed new light on two topics that are increasingly important to historians of the twentieth century.
Category: History

The Power Of Knowledge

Author : Jeremy Black
ISBN : 9780300198546
Genre : History
File Size : 85.44 MB
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Information is power. For more than five hundred years the success or failure of nations has been determined by a country’s ability to acquire knowledge and technical skill and transform them into strength and prosperity. Leading historian Jeremy Black approaches global history from a distinctive perspective, focusing on the relationship between information and society and demonstrating how the understanding and use of information have been the primary factors in the development and character of the modern age. Black suggests that the West’s ascension was a direct result of its institutions and social practices for acquiring, employing, and retaining information and the technology that was ultimately produced. His cogent and well-reasoned analysis looks at cartography and the hardware of communication, armaments and sea power, mercantilism and imperialism, science and astronomy, as well as bureaucracy and the management of information, linking the history of technology with the history of global power while providing important indicators for the future of our world.
Category: History

Journal Of The Civil War Era

Author : William A. Blair
ISBN : 9781469615998
Genre : History
File Size : 65.2 MB
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The Journal of the Civil War Era Volume 4, Number 3, September 2014 TABLE OF CONTENTS Editor's Note, William Blair Articles Felicity Turner Rights and the Ambiguities of Law: Infanticide in the Nineteenth-Century U.S. South Paul Quigley Civil War Conscription and the International Boundaries of Citizenship Jay Sexton William H. Seward in the World Review Essay Patick J. Kelly the European Revolutions of 1848 and the Transnational turn in Civil War History Book Reviews Books Received Notes on Contributors
Category: History

Barthes Mythologies Today

Author : Pete Bennett
ISBN : 9781136743726
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 45.96 MB
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This is Barthes’ seminal text reimagined in a contemporary context by contemporary academics. Through a revisiting of Mythologies, a key text in cultural and media studies, this volume explores the value these disciplines can add to an understanding of contemporary society and culture. Leading academics in media, English, education, and cultural studies here are tasked with identifying the "new mythologies" some fifty or so years on from Barthes’ original interventions. The contributions in this volume, then, are readings of contemporary culture, each engaging with a cultural event, practice, or text as mythological. These readings are then contextualized by an introduction which reflects on the ‘how’ of these engaging responses and an "essay at the back of the book" which replaces Myth Today with a reflection on the contemporary provenance of both Barthes and his most famous book. Thus the book is at least two things at once whichever way you look: a ‘new’ Mythologies and a book about Barthes’ legacy, an exploration of the place of theory in critical writing, and a book about contemporary culture.
Category: Social Science

After They Closed The Gates

Author : Libby Garland
ISBN : 9780226122595
Genre : History
File Size : 32.23 MB
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In 1921 and 1924, the United States passed laws to sharply reduce the influx of immigrants into the country. By allocating only small quotas to the nations of southern and eastern Europe, and banning almost all immigration from Asia, the new laws were supposed to stem the tide of foreigners considered especially inferior and dangerous. However, immigrants continued to come, sailing into the port of New York with fake passports, or from Cuba to Florida, hidden in the holds of boats loaded with contraband liquor. Jews, one of the main targets of the quota laws, figured prominently in the new international underworld of illegal immigration. However, they ultimately managed to escape permanent association with the identity of the “illegal alien” in a way that other groups, such as Mexicans, thus far, have not. In After They Closed the Gates, Libby Garland tells the untold stories of the Jewish migrants and smugglers involved in that underworld, showing how such stories contributed to growing national anxieties about illegal immigration. Garland also helps us understand how Jews were linked to, and then unlinked from, the specter of illegal immigration. By tracing this complex history, Garland offers compelling insights into the contingent nature of citizenship, belonging, and Americanness.
Category: History

Webs Of Empire

Author : Tony Ballantyne
ISBN : 9780774827713
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 48.82 MB
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Breaking open colonization to reveal tangled cultural and economic networks, Webs of Empire offers new paths into our colonial history. Linking Gore and Chicago, Maori and Asia, India and newspapers, whalers and writing, empire building becomes a spreading web of connected places, people, ideas, and trade. These links question narrow, national stories, while broadening perspectives on the past and the legacies of colonialism that persist today. Bringing together essays from two decades of prolific publishing on international colonial history, Webs of Empire establishes Tony Ballantyne as one of the leading historians of the British Empire.
Category: Social Science

The Other Americans In Paris

Author : Nancy L. Green
ISBN : 9780226137520
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 20.60 MB
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A “thorough and perceptive” portrait of the not-so-famous expatriates of the City of Light (The Wall Street Journal). History may remember the American artists, writers, and musicians of the Left Bank best, but the reality is that there were many more American businessmen, socialites, manufacturers’ representatives, and lawyers living on the other side of the River Seine. Be they newly minted American countesses married to foreigners with impressive titles or American soldiers who had settled in France after World War I with their French wives, they provide a new view of the notion of expatriates. Historian Nancy L. Green introduces us for the first time to a long-forgotten part of the American overseas population—predecessors to today’s expats—while exploring the politics of citizenship and the business relationships, love lives, and wealth (or in some cases, poverty) of Americans who staked their claim to the City of Light. The Other Americans in Paris shows that elite migration is a part of migration, and that debates over Americanization have deep roots in the twentieth century.
Category: Social Science

The Passport

Author : Martin Lloyd
ISBN : STANFORD:36105111838749
Genre : Law
File Size : 75.87 MB
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The passport is a document familiar to all, used and recognized worldwide. Yet, how does a passport actually work, and what happens when it doesn't? When was the first passport issued? How can a forged passport be detected, and how did a passport link Lord Palmerston to the attempted assassination of Napoleon III? In this book, Martin Lloyd uses his in-depth experience with H.M. Immigration Service to explore the problems, humour, crime and politics which constitute the history of the passport. The idea of the passport is not new. The Ancient Egyptians were known to have a passport system while, in Roman times, persons travelling on official business were issued with a Tractorium (a letter) in the name of the emperor. Yet contrary to the popular idea, passports were often used to prevent not facilitate travel. William the Conqueror allowed no one to enter or leave England without his permission while Henry I and Elizabeth I refused to grant passports to, respectively, the legate from the Pope and Mary, Queen of Scots. Passports have also enabled murder to take place and saved the lives of many Jews in the Second World War. However, their ultimate role appears to be that of control. When machine-readable passports provide the state with more information on the movement of citizens than at any time in history, many are beginning to ask whether the age of Big Brother has not already arrived. The Passport offers a unique perspective on the intriguing history of this document. Martin Lloyd draws on many years of research, and includes illustrations from his own collection, to create the first book on this subject.
Category: Law

Greening The Media

Author : Richard Maxwell
ISBN : 9780199939282
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 65.43 MB
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You will never look at your cell phone, TV, or computer the same way after reading this book. Greening the Media not only reveals the dirty secrets that hide inside our favorite electronic devices; it also takes apart the myths that have pushed these gadgets to the center of our lives. Marshaling an astounding array of economic, environmental, and historical facts, Maxwell and Miller debunk the idea that information and communication technologies (ICT) are clean and ecologically benign. The authors show how the physical reality of making, consuming, and discarding them is rife with toxic ingredients, poisonous working conditions, and hazardous waste. But all is not lost. As the title suggests, Maxwell and Miller dwell critically on these environmental problems in order to think creatively about ways to solve them. They enlist a range of potential allies in this effort to foster greener media--from green consumers to green citizens, with stops along the way to hear from exploited workers, celebrities, and assorted bureaucrats. Ultimately, Greening the Media rethinks the status of print and screen technologies, opening new lines of historical and social analysis of ICT, consumer electronics, and media production.
Category: Social Science