THE GOOD IMMIGRANT

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The Good Immigrant

Author : Nikesh Shukla
ISBN : 9780316524292
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 37.29 MB
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By turns heartbreaking and hilarious, troubling and uplifting, these "electric" essays come together to create a provocative, conversation-sparking, multivocal portrait of modern America (The Washington Post). From Trump's proposed border wall and travel ban to the marching of white supremacists in Charlottesville, America is consumed by tensions over immigration and the question of which bodies are welcome. In this much-anticipated follow-up to the bestselling UK edition, hailed by Zadie Smith as "lively and vital," editors Nikesh Shukla and Chimene Suleyman hand the microphone to an incredible range of writers whose humanity and right to be here is under attack. Chigozie Obioma unpacks an Igbo proverb that helped him navigate his journey to America from Nigeria. Jenny Zhang analyzes cultural appropriation in 90s fashion, recalling her own pain and confusion as a teenager trying to fit in. Fatimah Asghar describes the flood of memory and emotion triggered by an encounter with an Uber driver from Kashmir. Alexander Chee writes of a visit to Korea that changed his relationship to his heritage. These writers, and the many others in this urgent collection, share powerful personal stories of living between cultures and languages while struggling to figure out who they are and where they belong.
Category: Political Science

The Good Immigrant Usa

Author : Nikesh Shukla
ISBN : 9780349700359
Genre : Literary Collections
File Size : 73.68 MB
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GUARDIAN MUST READ BOOKS OF 2019 'The you-gotta-read-this anthology' Stylist 'This collection showcases the joy, empathy and fierceness needed to adopt the country as one's own' Publishers Weekly An urgent collection of essays by first- and second-generation immigrants, exploring what it's like to be othered in an increasingly divided America. From Trump's proposed border wall and travel ban to the marching of White Supremacists in Charlottesville, America is consumed by tensions over immigration and the question of which bodies are welcome. In this much-anticipated follow-up to the bestselling UK edition, hailed by Zadie Smith as 'lively and vital', editors Nikesh Shukla and Chimene Suleyman hand the microphone to an incredible range of writers whose humanity and right to be in the US is under attack. Chigozie Obioma unpacks an Igbo proverb that helped him navigate his journey to America from Nigeria. Jenny Zhang analyzes cultural appropriation in nineties fashion, recalling her own pain and confusion as a teenager trying to fit in. Fatimah Asghar describes the flood of memory and emotion triggered by an encounter with an Uber driver from Kashmir. Alexander Chee writes of a visit to Korea that changed his relationship to his heritage. These writers, and the many others in this singular collection, share powerful personal stories of living between cultures and languages while struggling to figure out who they are and where they belong. By turns heartbreaking and hilarious, troubling and uplifting, the essays in The Good Immigrant USA come together to create a provocative, conversation-sparking, multi-vocal portrait of America now. Essays from: Porochista Khakpour; Nicole Dennis-Benn; Rahawa Haile; Teju Cole; Priya Minhas; Walé Oyéjidé; Fatimah Asghar; Tejal Rao; Maeve Higgins; Krutika Mallikarjuna; Jim St. Germain; Jenny Zhang; Chigozie Obioma; Alexander Chee; Yann Demange; Jean Hannah Edelstein; Chimene Suleyman; Basim Usmani; Daniel José Older; Adrián Villar Rojas; Sebastián Villar Rojas; Dani Fernandez; Fatima Farheen Mirza; Susanne Ramírez de Arellano; Mona Chalabi; Jade Chang
Category: Literary Collections

The Good Immigrants

Author : Madeline Y. Hsu
ISBN : 9780691176215
Genre : History
File Size : 42.49 MB
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Conventionally, US immigration history has been understood through the lens of restriction and those who have been barred from getting in. In contrast, The Good Immigrants considers immigration from the perspective of Chinese elites—intellectuals, businessmen, and students—who gained entrance because of immigration exemptions. Exploring a century of Chinese migrations, Madeline Hsu looks at how the model minority characteristics of many Asian Americans resulted from US policies that screened for those with the highest credentials in the most employable fields, enhancing American economic competitiveness. The earliest US immigration restrictions targeted Chinese people but exempted students as well as individuals who might extend America's influence in China. Western-educated Chinese such as Madame Chiang Kai-shek became symbols of the US impact on China, even as they patriotically advocated for China's modernization. World War II and the rise of communism transformed Chinese students abroad into refugees, and the Cold War magnified the importance of their talent and training. As a result, Congress legislated piecemeal legal measures to enable Chinese of good standing with professional skills to become citizens. Pressures mounted to reform American discriminatory immigration laws, culminating with the 1965 Immigration Act. Filled with narratives featuring such renowned Chinese immigrants as I. M. Pei, The Good Immigrants examines the shifts in immigration laws and perceptions of cultural traits that enabled Asians to remain in the United States as exemplary, productive Americans.
Category: History

The Good Immigrant

Author : K. A. Dilday
ISBN : OCLC:76898808
Genre : France
File Size : 32.67 MB
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Category: France

Race And Immigration

Author : Nazli Kibria
ISBN : 9780745647913
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 86.95 MB
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Immigration has long shaped US society in fundamental ways. With Latinos recently surpassing African Americans as the largest minority group in the US, attention has been focused on the important implications of immigration for the character and role of race in US life, including patterns of racial inequality and racial identity. This insightful new book offers a fresh perspective on immigration and its part in shaping the racial landscape of the US today. Moving away from one-dimensional views of this relationship, it emphasizes the dynamic and mutually formative interactions of race and immigration. Drawing on a wide range of studies, it explores key aspects of the immigrant experience, such as the history of immigration laws, the formation of immigrant occupational niches, and developments of immigrant identity and community. Specific topics covered include: the perceived crisis of unauthorized immigration; the growth of an immigrant rights movement; the role of immigrant labor in the elder care industry; the racial strategies of professional immigrants; and the formation of pan-ethnic Latino identities. Written in an engaging and accessible style, this book will be invaluable for advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate-level courses in the sociology of immigration, race and ethnicity.
Category: Social Science

Entitled To Nothing

Author : Lisa Sun-Hee Park
ISBN : 9780814768020
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 76.49 MB
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In Entitled to Nothing, Lisa Sun-Hee Park investigates how the politics of immigration, health care, and welfare are intertwined. Documenting the formal return of the immigrant as a “public charge,” or a burden upon the State, the author shows how the concept has been revived as states adopt punitive policies targeting immigrants of color and require them to “pay back” benefits for which they are legally eligible during a time of intense debate regarding welfare reform. Park argues that the notions of “public charge” and “public burden” were reinvigorated in the 1990s to target immigrant women of reproductive age for deportation and as part of a larger project of “disciplining” immigrants. Drawing on nearly 200 interviews with immigrant organizations, government agencies and safety net providers, as well as careful tracking of policies and media coverage, Park provides vivid, first-person accounts of how struggles over the “public charge” doctrine unfolded on the ground, as well as its consequences for the immigrant community. Ultimately, she shows that the concept of “public charge” continues to lurk in the background, structuring our conception of who can legitimately access public programs and of the moral economy of work and citizenship in the U.S., and makes important policy suggestions for reforming our immigration system.
Category: Social Science

Reform Without Justice

Author : Alfonso Gonzales
ISBN : 9780190203269
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 23.85 MB
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Placed within the context of the past decade's war on terror and emergent Latino migrant movement, Reform without Justice addresses the issue of state violence against migrants in the United States. It questions what forces are driving draconian migration control policies and why it is that, despite its success in mobilizing millions, the Latino migrant movement and its allies have not been able to more successfully defend the rights of migrants. Gonzales argues that the contemporary Latino migrant movement and its allies face a dynamic form of political power that he terms "anti-migrant hegemony". This type of political power is exerted in multiple sites of power from Congress, to think tanks, talk shows and local government institutions, through which a rhetorically race neutral and common sense public policy discourse is deployed to criminalize migrants. Most insidiously anti-migrant hegemony allows for large sectors of "pro-immigrant" groups to concede to coercive immigration enforcement measures such as a militarized border wall and the expansion of immigration policing in local communities in exchange for so-called Comprehensive Immigration Reform. Given this reality, Gonzales sustains that most efforts to advance immigration reform will fail to provide justice for migrants. This is because proposed reform measures ignore the neoliberal policies driving migration and reinforce the structures of state violence used against migrants to the detriment of democracy for all. Reform without Justice concludes by discussing how Latino migrant activists - especially youth - and their allies can change this reality and help democratize the United States.
Category: Political Science

Immigrant Integration

Author : Kenise Murphy Kilbride
ISBN : 9781551305684
Genre : Canada
File Size : 51.67 MB
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Examining the issues and challenges facing immigrants as they attempt to integrate successfully into Canadian society, Immigrant Integration is a multidisciplinary compendium of research papers, most of which were presented at the 14th National Metropolis Conference, held in Toronto in 2012. This book addresses the growing economic and educational inequality among immigrants and racialized populations in Canada and seeks to guard against further inequities. The authors address policy issues, newcomers' health and well-being, cultural challenges, and resilience in immigrant communities. Each chapter concludes with a clear set of policy recommendations indicating how those in government and the broader public, private, and non-profit sectors can help newcomers integrate, as well as welcome them as significantly contributing members of Canadian society. Thorough and relevant, this book includes the research of academics, policy-makers, and experts from a wide range of disciplines, including sociology, immigration and settlement, public policy, social work, and geography. With a sense of urgency, these essays illustrate the existing and developing strains that Canadian public policy has created and will continue to create unless built upon the evidence current research has produced.
Category: Canada

What Have The Immigrants Ever Done For Us

Author : Kelvin MacKenzie
ISBN : 9781849549028
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 64.23 MB
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Right now, immigration is a central point of discussion in both political debate and cultural discourse. With the growth of right-wing parties in Britain, it seems that animosity towards outsiders is increasing every day - after all, immigrants come to our country, steal our jobs and exploit our public services, but what do they give us in return? In this bold new addition to the Provocations series, Kelvin MacKenzie speaks out about immigration in the thought-provoking, no-hold-barred manner the public has come to expect from him ... but with one crucial twist. Kelvin supports immigration. Indeed, he makes the point that many of the institutions we deem to be quintessentially British - Marks & Spencer, Stephen Fry, the NHS, the Great Western Railway and even Kelvin's former newspaper, The Sun - would not exist at all without immigration. As paranoia and misinformation corrupt British opinion, it is more important than ever to acknowledge the monumental contribution immigrants have made to this country historically, culturally, economically, politically - and continuously. Like Monty Python before us, the time has come to ask what the immigrants have ever done for us - although perhaps it would be more apt to ask what we would do without them.
Category: Social Science