TEUTOBURG-FOREST-AD-9

Download Teutoburg-forest-ad-9 ebook PDF or Read Online books in PDF, EPUB, and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to TEUTOBURG-FOREST-AD-9 book pdf for free now.

Teutoburg Forest Ad 9

Author : Michael McNally
ISBN : 1846035813
Genre : History
File Size : 28.55 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 863
Read : 920

Osprey's study of one of the most important battles of the long-elasting Germanic Wars (113 BC - 439 AD). Arminius, a young member of the Cheruscan tribe under the Roman Empire felt that Rome could be beaten in battle and that such a victory would guarantee the freedom of the Germans as a confederation of independent tribes, led by the Cheruscans, who would - in turn - be led by him. Throughout AD 8 and the early part of AD 9, Arminius used his position under the governor of Germania Inferior well, ostensibly promoting Rome whilst in reality welding the tribes together in an anti-Roman alliance, agreeing with his confederates that they would wait until the Roman garrison had moved to their summer quarters and then rise up against the invaders. With the arrival of September, the time soon came for the Roman troops to return to their stations along the Rhine and as they marched westwards through the almost impenetrable Teutoburg Forest, Arminius sprang his trap. In a series of running battles in the forest, Varus' army, consisting of three Roman Legions (XVII, XVIII and XIX) and several thousand auxiliaries - a total of roughly 20,000 men - was destroyed. The consequences for Rome were enormous - the province of Germania was now virtually undefended and Gaul was open to a German invasion which although it never materialized, led a traumatized Augustus to decree that, henceforth, the Rhine would remain the demarcation line between the Roman world and the German tribes, in addition to which the destroyed legions were never re-formed or their numbers reused in the Roman Army: after AD 9, the sequence of numbers would run from I to XVI and then from XX onwards, it was as if the three legions had never existed.
Category: History

What If

Author : Robert Cowley
ISBN : 1101118911
Genre : History
File Size : 25.31 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 390
Read : 882

With its in-depth reflections on the monumental events of the past, this amazing book of essays ponders what might have been if things had gone differently in history. Featuring Stephen J. Ambrose, John Keegan, and many others.
Category: History

Augustus

Author : Adrian Goldsworthy
ISBN : 9780297864264
Genre : History
File Size : 26.63 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 892
Read : 376

'Masterly' - Robert Harris, author of Imperium 'Essential reading for anyone interested in Ancient Rome' Independent ***** Caesar Augustus schemed and fought his way to absolute power. He became Rome's first emperor and ruled for forty-four years before dying peacefully in his bed. The system he created would endure for centuries. Yet, despite his exceptional success, he is a difficult man to pin down, and far less well-known than his great-uncle, Julius Caesar. His story is not always edifying: he murdered his opponents, exiled his daughter when she failed to conform and freely made and broke alliances as he climbed ever higher. However, the peace and stability he fostered were real, and under his rule the empire prospered. Adrian Goldsworthy examines the ancient sources to understand the man and his times.
Category: History

Clio And The Poets

Author : David S. Levene
ISBN : 9004117822
Genre : Literary Criticism
File Size : 87.15 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 613
Read : 449

In this book seventeen leading scholars examine the interaction between historiography and poetry in the Augustan age: how poets drew on or reacted against historians presentation of the world, and how, conversely, historians transformed poetic themes for their own ends.
Category: Literary Criticism

The Making Of The Roman Army

Author : Lawrence Keppie
ISBN : 9781134746033
Genre : History
File Size : 24.51 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 365
Read : 367

In this new edition, with a new preface and an updated bibliography, the author provides a comprehensive and well-documented survey of the evolution and growth of the remarkable military enterprise of the Roman army. Lawrence Keppie overcomes the traditional dichotomy between the historical view of the Republic and the archaeological approach to the Empire by examining archaeological evidence from the earlier years. The arguments of The Making of the Roman Army are clearly illustrated with specially prepared maps and diagrams and photographs of Republican monuments and coins.
Category: History

Terror In Teutoburg Forest

Author : John L. Rothdiener
ISBN : 9781467845670
Genre : Fiction
File Size : 20.99 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 675
Read : 714

“An evil empire is determined to enslave them and take their land. I feel we have an obligation to stand and fight.” --Sergeant Matt Taylor, United States Army Teutoburg Forest, 2009 The Terrorist Assault Team’s orders were clear. They were to storm the house, capture the terrorists, free the hostages and contain the bomb. None of the twenty-six member, highly trained TAT team was prepared for what would take place on that hot August night. Through a bizarre chain of events, these GI’s lives would change forever. They would be forced to choose between a new life or fight for freedom in a way they never imagined. “Varus, Varus give me back my legions.” --Caesar Augustus, 9AD Teutoburg Forest, 9 AD One of the greatest battles of all time took place in Teutoburg Forest in 9AD. When it was over, more than twenty thousand seasoned Roman Soldiers were dead. How could a poorly armed, undisciplined group of Germanic warriors defeat this mighty foe? What happened to Varus, the general of the Roman army and his famous soldiers is revealed in this thrilling plot. This is the unknown story of how the battle is fought and how it became a turning point in history. Terror in Teutoburg Forest Relive the battle that helped shape the world, as we know it today. This gripping account of how the onslaught occurred is skillfully captured in this exciting historic novel, Terror in Teutoburg Forest, related by author John L. Rothdiener.
Category: Fiction

Germany

Author : Neil MacGregor
ISBN : 9780241008348
Genre : History
File Size : 39.87 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 915
Read : 1305

From Neil MacGregor, the author of A History of the World in 100 Objects, this is a view of Germany like no other Today, as the dominant economic force in Europe, Germany looms as large as ever over world affairs. But how much do we really understand about it, and how do its people understand themselves? In this enthralling new book, Neil MacGregor guides us through the complex history, culture and identity of this most mercurial of countries by telling the stories behind 30 objects in his uniquely magical way. Beginning with the fifteenth-century invention of the Gutenberg press, MacGregor ventures beyond the usual sticking point of the Second World War to get to the heart of a nation that has given us Luther and Hitler, the Beetle and Brecht - and remade our world again and again. This is a view of Germany like no other. Neil MacGregor has been Director of the British Museum since August 2002. He was Director of the National Gallery in London from 1987 to 2002. His celebrated books include A History of the World in 100 Objects, now translated into more than a dozen languages and one of the top-selling titles ever published by Penguin Press, and Shakespeare's Restless World.
Category: History

The Fall Of The Roman Empire

Author : Peter Heather
ISBN : 0199741182
Genre : History
File Size : 63.23 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 260
Read : 1225

The death of the Roman Empire is one of the perennial mysteries of world history. Now, in this groundbreaking book, Peter Heather proposes a stunning new solution: Centuries of imperialism turned the neighbors Rome called barbarians into an enemy capable of dismantling an Empire that had dominated their lives for so long. A leading authority on the late Roman Empire and on the barbarians, Heather relates the extraordinary story of how Europe's barbarians, transformed by centuries of contact with Rome on every possible level, eventually pulled the empire apart. He shows first how the Huns overturned the existing strategic balance of power on Rome's European frontiers, to force the Goths and others to seek refuge inside the Empire. This prompted two generations of struggle, during which new barbarian coalitions, formed in response to Roman hostility, brought the Roman west to its knees. The Goths first destroyed a Roman army at the battle of Hadrianople in 378, and went on to sack Rome in 410. The Vandals spread devastation in Gaul and Spain, before conquering North Africa, the breadbasket of the Western Empire, in 439. We then meet Attila the Hun, whose reign of terror swept from Constantinople to Paris, but whose death in 453 ironically precipitated a final desperate phase of Roman collapse, culminating in the Vandals' defeat of the massive Byzantine Armada: the west's last chance for survival. Peter Heather convincingly argues that the Roman Empire was not on the brink of social or moral collapse. What brought it to an end were the barbarians.
Category: History

Germany

Author : Eric Solsten
ISBN : 0788181793
Genre :
File Size : 53.37 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 541
Read : 292

Reviews Germany's history, and treats in a concise and objective manner its dominant social, political, economic, and military aspects. Sections, written by experts, include: chronology of important events; early history to 1945; history 1945-1990; the society and its environment; social welfare, health care, and educ.; the domestic economy; international economic relations; government and politics; foreign relations; national security; military tradition; strategic concerns and military missions; the armed forces; defense budget; and such military issues as uniforms, ranks, and insignia, defense production and export, foreign military relations, and internal security.
Category:

Telling Tales

Author : David Blamires
ISBN : 9781906924096
Genre : Literary Criticism
File Size : 81.87 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 600
Read : 393

Germany has had a profound influence on English stories for children. The Brothers Grimm, The Swiss Family Robinson and Johanna Spyri's Heidi quickly became classics but, as David Blamires clearly articulates in this volume, many other works have been fundamental in the development of English chilren's stories during the 19th Centuary and beyond. Telling Tales is the first comprehensive study of the impact of Germany on English children's books, covering the period from 1780 to the First World War. Beginning with The Adventures of Baron Munchausen, moving through the classics and including many other collections of fairytales and legends (Musaus, Wilhelm Hauff, Bechstein, Brentano) Telling Tales covers a wealth of translated and adapted material in a large variety of forms, and pays detailed attention to the problems of translation and adaptation of texts for children. In addition, Telling Tales considers educational works (Campe and Salzmann), moral and religious tales (Carove, Schmid and Barth), historical tales, adventure stories and picture books (including Wilhelm Busch's Max and Moritz) together with an analysis of what British children learnt through textbooks about Germany as a country and its variegated history, particularly in times of war.
Category: Literary Criticism