Sundown Towns A Hidden Dimension Of American Racism

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Sundown Towns

Author : James W. Loewen
ISBN : 9781565848870
Genre : History
File Size : 61.4 MB
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Investigates segregation practices in the northern sections of twentieth-century America revealing how racial exclusion and oppression persisted into the contemporary era, and challenging modern beliefs about race and racism.
Category: History

Sundown Towns

Author : James W. Loewen
ISBN : 9781620974544
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 30.50 MB
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“Powerful and important . . . an instant classic.” —The Washington Post Book World The award-winning look at an ugly aspect of American racism by the bestselling author of Lies My Teacher Told Me, reissued with a new preface by the author In this groundbreaking work, sociologist James W. Loewen, author of the classic bestseller Lies My Teacher Told Me, brings to light decades of hidden racial exclusion in America. In a provocative, sweeping analysis of American residential patterns, Loewen uncovers the thousands of “sundown towns”—almost exclusively white towns where it was an unspoken rule that blacks weren’t welcome—that cropped up throughout the twentieth century, most of them located outside of the South. Written with Loewen’s trademark honesty and thoroughness, Sundown Towns won the Gustavus Myers Outstanding Book Award, received starred reviews in Publishers Weekly and Booklist, and launched a nationwide online effort to track down and catalog sundown towns across America. In a new preface, Loewen puts this history in the context of current controversies around white supremacy and the Black Lives Matter movement. He revisits sundown towns and finds the number way down, but with notable exceptions in exclusive all-white suburbs such as Kenilworth, Illinois, which as of 2010 had not a single black household. And, although many former sundown towns are now integrated, they often face “second-generation sundown town issues,” such as in Ferguson, Missouri, a former sundown town that is now majority black, but with a majority-white police force.
Category: Social Science

Sundown Towns

Author : James W. Loewen
ISBN : 9780743294485
Genre : History
File Size : 82.34 MB
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A narrative investigation of segregation practices in the northern sections of twentieth-century America reveals how racial exclusion and oppression persisted into the contemporary era, in an account that challenges modern beliefs about race and racism.
Category: History

The Crisis

Author :
ISBN :
Genre :
File Size : 84.66 MB
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The Crisis, founded by W.E.B. Du Bois as the official publication of the NAACP, is a journal of civil rights, history, politics, and culture and seeks to educate and challenge its readers about issues that continue to plague African Americans and other communities of color. For nearly 100 years, The Crisis has been the magazine of opinion and thought leaders, decision makers, peacemakers and justice seekers. It has chronicled, informed, educated, entertained and, in many instances, set the economic, political and social agenda for our nation and its multi-ethnic citizens.
Category:

A State By State History Of Race And Racism In The United States 2 Volumes

Author : Patricia Reid-Merritt
ISBN : 9781440856013
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 45.17 MB
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Providing chronologies of important events, historical narratives from the first settlement to the present, and biographies of major figures, this work offers readers an unseen look at the history of racism from the perspective of individual states. • Comprises detailed narratives encompassing the first European contact to the present day of the unique racial history of all 50 states and the District of Columbia • Provides a chronology of important racial events, achievements, and milestones for the states, plus the District of Columbia • Offers biographies of individuals who successfully confronted racism in America and removed obstacles to social achievement • Includes sidebars highlighting interesting events, individuals, and accomplishments relevant to the racial history of particular states
Category: Social Science

Up A Creek With A Paddle

Author : James W. Loewen
ISBN : 1629638277
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 52.69 MB
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Rivers are good metaphors for life, and paddling for living. In this little book, Loewen skilfully makes these connections without sermonising, resulting in nuggets of wisdom about how to live, how to act meaningfully, and perhaps how to die. Loewen also returns to his life s work and gently addresses the origins of racism and inequality, the theory of history, confronting institutional dishonesty, but mostly, as in his life, he finds rueful humour in every canoeing fiasco and he has had many!
Category: Biography & Autobiography

Police Use Of Excessive Force Against African Americans

Author : Ray Von Robertson
ISBN : 9781498539197
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 52.70 MB
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Robertson and Chaney examine how the early antecedents of police brutality like plantation overseers, the lynching of African American males, early race riots, the Rodney King incident, and the Los Angeles Rampart Scandal have directly impacted the current relationship between communities of color and police.
Category: Social Science

The Color Of Crime

Author : Katheryn Russell-Brown
ISBN : 0814776175
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 59.84 MB
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"Perhaps the most explosive and troublesome phenomenon at the nexus of race and crime is the racial hoax - a contemporary version of The Boy Who Cried Wolf. Examining both White-on-Black hoaxes such as Susan Smith's and Charles Stuart's claims that Black men were responsible for crimes they themselves committed, and Black-on-White hoaxes such as the Tawana Brawley episode, Russell illustrates the formidable and lasting damage that occurs when racial stereotypes are manipulated and exploited for personal advantage. She shows us how such hoaxes have disastrous consequences and argues for harsher punishments for offenders."--BOOK JACKET.
Category: Social Science

American Pogrom

Author : Charles L. Lumpkins
ISBN : 9780821418031
Genre : History
File Size : 33.72 MB
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On July 2 and 3, 1917, race riots rocked the small industrial city of East St. Louis, Illinois. American Pogrom takes the reader beyond that pivotal time in the city’s history to explore black people’s activism from the antebellum era to the eve of the post–World War II civil rights movement. Lumpkins asserts that the race riots were a pogrom—an organized massacre of a particular ethnic group—orchestrated by certain businessmen intent on preventing black residents from attaining political power and on turning the city into a “sundown” town permanently cleared of African Americans, he also demonstrates how the African American community survived. He situates the activities of the black citizens of East St. Louis in the context of the larger story of the African American quest for freedom, citizenship, and equality.
Category: History

The Color Of Wealth

Author : Barbara Robles
ISBN : 9781595585622
Genre : Business & Economics
File Size : 77.24 MB
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For every dollar owned by the average white family in the United States, the average family of color has less than a dime. Why do people of color have so little wealth? The Color of Wealth lays bare a dirty secret: for centuries, people of color have been barred by laws and by discrimination from participating in government wealth-building programs that benefit white Americans. This accessible book—published in conjunction with one of the country’s leading economics education organizations—makes the case that until government policy tackles disparities in wealth, not just income, the United States will never have racial or economic justice. Written by five leading experts on the racial wealth divide who recount the asset-building histories of Native Americans, Latinos, African Americans, Asian Americans, and European Americans, this book is a uniquely comprehensive multicultural history of American wealth. With its focus on public policies—how, for example, many post–World War II GI Bill programs helped whites only—The Color of Wealth is the first book to demonstrate the decisive influence of government on Americans’ net worth.
Category: Business & Economics

A People S History Of Poverty In America

Author : Stephen Pimpare
ISBN : 9781595586964
Genre : History
File Size : 85.9 MB
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In this compulsively readable social history, political scientist Stephen Pimpare vividly describes poverty from the perspective of poor and welfare-reliant Americans from the big city to the rural countryside. He focuses on how the poor have created community, secured shelter, and found food and illuminates their battles for dignity and respect. Through prodigious archival research and lucid analysis, Pimpare details the ways in which charity and aid for the poor have been inseparable, more often than not, from the scorn and disapproval of those who would help them. In the rich and often surprising historical testimonies he has collected from the poor in America, Pimpare overturns any simple conclusions about how the poor see themselves or what it feels like to be poor—and he shows clearly that the poor are all too often aware that charity comes with a price. It is that price that Pimpare eloquently questions in this book, reminding us through powerful anecdotes, some heart-wrenching and some surprisingly humorous, that poverty is not simply a moral failure.
Category: History

Lies My Teacher Told Me

Author : James Loewen
ISBN : 9781595586537
Genre : Education
File Size : 80.4 MB
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Since its first publication in 1995, Lies My Teacher Told Me has gone on to win an American Book Award, the Oliver Cromwell Cox Award for Distinguished Anti-Racist Scholarship, and to sell over half a million copies in its various editions. What started out as a survey of the twelve leading American history textbooks has ended up being what the San Francisco Chronicle calls “an extremely convincing plea for truth in education.” In Lies My Teacher Told Me, James W. Loewen brings history alive in all its complexity and ambiguity. Beginning with pre-Columbian history and ranging over characters and events as diverse as Reconstruction, Helen Keller, the first Thanksgiving, and the Mai Lai massacre, Loewen offers an eye-opening critique of existing textbooks, and a wonderful retelling of American history as it should—and could—be taught to American students. This 10th anniversary edition features a handsome new cover and a new introduction by the author.
Category: Education

Old Islam In Detroit

Author : Sally Howell
ISBN : 9780199372027
Genre : Religion
File Size : 43.3 MB
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Across North America, Islam is portrayed as a religion of immigrants, converts, and cultural outsiders. Yet Muslims have been part of American society for much longer than most people realize. This book documents the history of Islam in Detroit, a city that is home to several of the nation's oldest, most diverse Muslim communities. In the early 1900s, there were thousands of Muslims in Detroit. Most came from Eastern Europe, the Ottoman Empire, and British India. In 1921, they built the nation's first mosque in Highland Park. By the 1930s, new Islam-oriented social movements were taking root among African Americans in Detroit. By the 1950s, Albanians, Arabs, African Americans, and South Asians all had mosques and religious associations in the city, and they were confident that Islam could be, and had already become, an American religion. When immigration laws were liberalized in 1965, new immigrants and new African American converts rapidly became the majority of U.S. Muslims. For them, Detroit's old Muslims and their mosques seemed oddly Americanized, even unorthodox. Old Islam in Detroit explores the rise of Detroit's earliest Muslim communities. It documents the culture wars and doctrinal debates that ensued as these populations confronted Muslim newcomers who did not understand their manner of worship or the American identities they had created. Looking closely at this historical encounter, Old Islam in Detroit provides a new interpretation of the possibilities and limits of Muslim incorporation in American life. It shows how Islam has become American in the past and how the anxieties many new Muslim Americans and non-Muslims feel about the place of Islam in American society today are not inevitable, but are part of a dynamic process of political and religious change that is still unfolding.
Category: Religion

From Coveralls To Zoot Suits

Author : Elizabeth R. Escobedo
ISBN : 9781469602066
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 48.94 MB
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During World War II, unprecedented employment avenues opened up for women and minorities in U.S. defense industries at the same time that massive population shifts and the war challenged Americans to rethink notions of race. At this extraordinary historical moment, Mexican American women found new means to exercise control over their lives in the home, workplace, and nation. In From Coveralls to Zoot Suits, Elizabeth R. Escobedo explores how, as war workers and volunteers, dance hostesses and zoot suiters, respectable young ladies and rebellious daughters, these young women used wartime conditions to serve the United States in its time of need and to pursue their own desires. But even after the war, as Escobedo shows, Mexican American women had to continue challenging workplace inequities and confronting family and communal resistance to their broadening public presence. Highlighting seldom heard voices of the "Greatest Generation," Escobedo examines these contradictions within Mexican families and their communities, exploring the impact of youth culture, outside employment, and family relations on the lives of women whose home-front experiences and everyday life choices would fundamentally alter the history of a generation.
Category: Social Science

Southeastern Geographer

Author : David M. Cochran Jr.
ISBN : 9780807872611
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 64.26 MB
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Table of Contents for Volume 52, Number 4 (Winter 2012) Special Issue: Placing Memory and Heritage in the Geography Classroom Guest Editor: Chris W. Post Cover Art The Mule Pull at the Mississippi Pecan Festival Joseph S. Miller Introduction: Placing Memory and Heritage in the Geography Classroom Chris W. Post Part I: Papers ''History by the Spoonful'' in North Carolina: The Textual Politics of State Highway Historical Markers Derek H. Alderman Remembrance and Place-Making: Teaching Students to Look Ahead While Looking Back Stephen S. Birdsall Editing Memory and Automobility & Race: Two Learning Activities on Contested Heritage and Place Kenneth E. Foote A Tale of Two Civil War Statues: Teaching the Geographies of Memory and Heritage in Norfolk, Virginia Jonathan I. Leib Objectives and Prospects for Bringing Service-Learning into the Memory and Heritage Classroom Chris W. Post Making Memory, Making Landscapes: Classroom Applications of Parallel Trends in the Study of Landscape, Memory, and Learning Owen J. Dwyer and Matthew McCourt Part II: Geographical Notes A Tribute to Dr. Louis De Vorsey, Jr. (1929–2012) Sanford H. Bederman Part III: Reviews From Chicaza to Chickasaw: The European Invasion and the Transformation of the Mississippian World, 1540–1715 Robbie Ethridge Reviewed by Craig S. Revels Key Methods in Geography Nicholas Clifford, Shaun French, and Gill Valentine (Editors) Reviewed by Bandana Kar
Category: Social Science

Diversity And Education

Author : Michael Vavrus
ISBN : 9780807773437
Genre : Education
File Size : 22.42 MB
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In his new book, Michael Vavrus helps readers better understand why issues of diversity and difference are so highly contested in the United States and across the globe. Vavrus incorporates specific education examples throughout the text to examine six contested areas: race and ethnicity; socioeconomic class and culture; multicultural and ethnic studies; language; religion; and sexuality and gender. In each of these areas, the author explores how contrasting worldviews found in social conservatism, liberal multiculturalism, and critical multiculturalism influence our understandings about difference and diversity and the education policies we develop as a result. Diversity and Education is designed to help educators move beyond the “how can they believe that?” knee-jerk reaction toward a more informed, strategic understanding of belief systems and political affiliations. Book Features: Brings a contemporary, 21st–century perspective to differing political orientations toward diversity and education. Examines outcomes of diversity debates on children of color, the poor, immigrants, women, and sexual and religious minorities. Uses critical pedagogy with a historical and political economy lens to explain current diversity issues in education. Critiques the diversity stance of new national teacher education standards from the Council for Accreditation of Educator Preparation. “Diversity and Education can not only help us have conversations about racism, institutionalizedoppression, and cultural fear, it can also offer an intervention that can movereaders towards a deeper critical consciousness about diversity and multicultural education in their own lives.” —From the Foreword by Wayne Au, associate professor at the University of Washington, Bothell, and an editor for Rethinking Schools “Few education scholars have offered as potent and cogent a political and economic analysis of multicultural education and diversity as Professor Michael Vavrus has in his new book. His critique of neoliberalism via critical pedagogy and his advocacy of social justice education are timely and praiseworthy.” —Ramin Farahmandpur, professor, Graduate School of Education, Portland State University “Diversity and Education is a must-read for anyone concerned about why so many policies claiming to ‘help’ diverse students fail, and what alternatives exist. Vavrus clearly believes in the power of teachers who are well-educated critical thinkers. In this lucid and compelling text, he skillfully applies a highly useful framework to unpack historical and contemporary debates about core concepts underlying multiple struggles for education and rights.” —Christine Sleeter, professor emerita, California State University, Monterey Bay
Category: Education

Food And Urbanism

Author : Susan Parham
ISBN : 9780857854742
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 88.7 MB
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Cities are home to over fifty percent of the world's population, a figure which is expected to increase enormously by 2050. Despite the growing demand on urban resources and infrastructure, food is still often overlooked as a key factor in planning and designing cities. Without incorporating food into the design process – how it is grown, transported, and bought, cooked, eaten and disposed of – it is impossible to create truly resilient and convivial urbanism. Moving from the table and home garden to the town, city, and suburbs, Food and Urbanism explores the connections between food and place in past and present design practices. The book also looks to future methods for extending the 'gastronomic' possibilities of urban space. Supported by examples from places across the world, including the UK, Norway, Germany, France, Spain, Portugal, Greece, Romania, Australia and the USA, the book offers insights into how the interplay of physical design and socio-spatial practices centred around food can help to maintain socially rich, productive and sustainable urban space. Susan Parham brings together the latest research from a number of disciplines – urban planning, food studies, sociology, geography, and design – with her own fieldwork on a range of foodscapes to highlight the fundamental role food has to play in shaping the urban future.
Category: Social Science

The Confederate And Neo Confederate Reader

Author : James W. Loewen
ISBN : 1604737883
Genre : History
File Size : 65.88 MB
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Most Americans hold basic misconceptions about the Confederacy, the Civil War, and the actions of subsequent neo-Confederates. For example, two thirds of Americans—including most history teachers—think the Confederate States seceded for “states’ rights.” This error persists because most have never read the key documents about the Confederacy. These documents have always been there. When South Carolina seceded, it published “Declaration of the Immediate Causes Which Induce and Justify the Secession of South Carolina from the Federal Union.” The document actually opposes states’ rights. Its authors argue that Northern states were ignoring the rights of slave owners as identified by Congress and in the Constitution. Similarly, Mississippi’s “Declaration of the Immediate Causes …” says, “Our position is thoroughly identified with the institution of slavery—the greatest material interest of the world.” Later documents in this collection show how neo-Confederates obfuscated this truth, starting around 1890. The evidence also points to the centrality of race in neo-Confederate thought even today and to the continuing importance of neo-Confederate ideas in American political life. The 150th anniversary of secession and civil war provides a moment for all Americans to read these documents, properly set in context by award-winning sociologist and historian James W. Loewen and co-editor, Edward H. Sebesta, to put in perspective the mythology of the Old South.
Category: History

The Reapers

Author : John Connolly
ISBN : 9781416570059
Genre : Fiction
File Size : 83.22 MB
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Darkly brilliant and intuitive private detective Charlie Parker returns in the next thrilling installment of the New York Times bestselling series by John Connolly about an elite group of killers. The Reapers are the elite of killers, the best at their trade, and Louis, confidante of troubled private detective Charlie Parker, is one of their number. Now the sins of his past are about to be visited upon him, for someone is hunting Louis, targeting his home, his businesses, and his partner, Angel. The instrument of his revenge is Bliss, the killer of killers, the most feared of assasins, and a man with a personal vendetta against Louis. But when Louis and Angel decide to strike back, they disappear, and their friends are forced to band together to find them. They are led by Parker, a killer himself, a reaper in waiting... The harvest is about to begin.
Category: Fiction

The Crisis

Author :
ISBN : STANFORD:36105133523600
Genre : African Americans
File Size : 39.65 MB
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Category: African Americans