RAILROAD DEPOTS OF NORTHEAST OHIO IMAGES OF RAIL

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Railroad Depots Of Northeast Ohio

Author : Mark J. Camp
ISBN : 0738551155
Genre : History
File Size : 69.31 MB
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The first rail lines in northeast Ohio opened for business in July 1850, and by the 1890s, northeast Ohio was laced with railroad tracks. Cleveland was the hub of railroad activity, and important rail-served lake ports developed at Ashtabula, Conneaut, Fairport Harbor, Huron, and Lorain. Akron became a center of southerly east-west lines. Over 310 passenger and combination depots were established at various points along the railroads to serve the needs of passengers traveling throughout northeast Ohio. Depots were the focal point of communities--news arrived over their telegraphs, traveling salesmen gathered on the trackside platforms, depot staff maneuvered four-wheel wagons loaded with baggage, parcels, and milk cans, locals gathered to meet, greet, and send off family and friends. The depot was a veritable beehive of activity at train time. Railroad Depots of Northeast Ohio offers a glimpse into these golden years of train travel through the use of early postcards and photographs of selected depots and related structures.
Category: History

Railroad Depots Of Southwest Ohio

Author : Mark J. Camp
ISBN : 0738584150
Genre : History
File Size : 77.32 MB
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Springfield was the original destination of the two oldest railroad companies to lay rails in Ohio, the Mad River and Lake Erie Railroad and the Little Miami Railroad. This would form the first rail link between Lake Erie and the Ohio River. Other routes became more important as rails eventually spread like spokes of a wheel from Cincinnati, and connections were made to Akron, Chicago, Cleveland, Columbus, Dayton, Indianapolis, Lexington, Louisville, Marietta, Pittsburgh, St. Louis, and Toledo as well as many other cities by the late 1800s. Hundreds of depots were erected to serve train travelers, ranging from the smallest shelter to the standard combined passenger-freight building to the major city passenger terminal. Cincinnati, Dayton, and Springfield became railroad centers, and towns like Blanchester, Hamilton, Loveland, Middletown, Morrow, Wilmington, and Xenia, served by more than one line, became busy transfer points. With the decline of rail passenger service, depots became unnecessary--many were demolished. Railroad Depots of Southwest Ohio presents a pictorial look at a sampling of these grand structures when they were in their prime.
Category: History

Railroad Depots Of Central Ohio

Author : Mark J. Camp
ISBN : 0738561746
Genre : History
File Size : 79.18 MB
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By the mid-1850s, the railroad craze had hit central Ohio. Pioneer railroads that were to evolve into portions of the Baltimore and Ohio, New York Central, and Pennsylvania Railroads connected the state capital, Columbus, with the canals, Lake Erie, and the Ohio River. The region was crisscrossed by numerous other lines by 1880; Columbus became the main hub while other railroad centers included Circleville, Delaware, Mansfield, Mount Vernon, Newark, and Zanesville. Hundreds of depots were built throughout central Ohio to serve railroad passengers and to handle baggage, mail, and freight. Depots became the center of commerce and activity at communities--big and small. With the discontinuance of passenger trains across the Buckeye State, many depots disappeared from trackside--many simply demolished, others relocated for non-railroad uses. Railroad Depots of Central Ohio offers a pictorial history of selected depots, centering around Columbus and Franklin County, using old postcards and vintage photographs.
Category: History

Railroad Depots Of Northern Indiana

Author : David E. Longest
ISBN : 0738541311
Genre : History
File Size : 81.57 MB
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Through photographs of depots, freight houses, and other railroad structures, long demolished yet an integral part of community development, "Railroad Depots of Northern Indiana" reviews the history of the cities and towns that used the rail to transport raw materials and finished manufactured products across the state.
Category: History

Railroads Depots Of Northwest Ohio

Author : Mark J. Camp
ISBN : 0738534013
Genre : History
File Size : 43.45 MB
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Chartered as early as 1832, Northwestern Ohio railroads were among the first in the Midwest. Toledo, a rapidly developing lake port at the mouth of the Maumee River, was the destination point for many lines; others were just passing through on their way to Chicago and points west. By 1907, 20 lines served the northwestern counties. All had a series of stations along their lines, often with depots or other railroad structures. Although many have come and gone, Northwest Ohio was once home to over 250 passenger or combination depots serving the traveling public. Railroad Depots of Northwest Ohio relives the golden age of railroad travel through vintage postcards and mid-20th century photos of selected depots and related structures.
Category: History

Railroad Depots Of West Central Ohio

Author : Mark J. Camp
ISBN : 0738540099
Genre : History
File Size : 58.78 MB
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Twelve railroad lines served west central Ohio around 1907 and were the lifeblood of the communities they ran through. Bellefontaine, Bradford, and Crestline became major terminals, and lesser known places like Dola, Ohio City, and Peoria also owe their existence to the iron horse. Around 300 depots served the west central region, with the earliest dating to the late 1840s. The depot was the center of activity in the smallest village to the largest city. Many of the depots no longer exist--victims of progress, nature, or neglect. Some survive as historical museums, various businesses, and residences; a few remain in railroad use. The proud history of railroading lives on in the restored depots at Bucyrus and Galion--two architectural gems of the Buckeye State. Railroad Depots of West Central Ohio shares a tale of the golden age of rail travel through vintage postcards and mid-20th-century photographs of selected depots and other railroad structures.
Category: History

Railroad Depots Of Michigan

Author : David J. Mrozek
ISBN : 0738551929
Genre : History
File Size : 28.31 MB
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Michigan has a rich railroad history, which began in November 1836, when the Erie and Kalamazoo Railroad initiated service between Toledo, Ohio, and Adrian, Michigan. That first Erie and Kalamazoo train consisted of stagecoach-like vehicles linked together and pulled by horses. Steam locomotive-hauled trains were still eight months in the future. As these new transportation entities grew and prospered, they put in place more elaborate station buildings in the communities they served. By the end of the 19th century, some of the larger railroad stations being built in Michigan were works of art in their own right. But whatever size and form they took, railroad stations were uniquely styled buildings, and there was generally no mistaking them for anything else. This volume portrays some of Michigan's finest railroad stations during their heyday in the second decade of the 20th century.
Category: History

Railroad Depots Of Southern Indiana

Author : David E. Longest
ISBN : 0738539589
Genre : History
File Size : 56.67 MB
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Did you know that Greene County in Indiana has one of the longest land-crossing railroad trestles in the Midwest? Are you aware that the Southern Railway once used half of the railroad tunnels in the state? Indiana's first railroad, built in Shelbyville, was only a mile long, but in 1847, completion of a major steam railroad from Madison to Indianapolis made the state's capital a center of transportation. Unlike canals, railroads could be built just about anywhere. Southern Indiana's quickly growing network of rail lines was able to haul tons of goods at low cost, and enabled settlers to travel great distances in a single day. Railroad Depots of Southern Indiana takes the reader on a journey through the towns and cities that shape Indiana's railroad lore. Images depict regional rail history from the inner workings of now demolished depots to one of the oldest "short lines" in Indiana. Through more than 200 vintage photographs, author David E. Longest documents locomotives, rail equipment, the moving of stock, depots, rail stations, and freight houses, and finishes with a tour of the rail museums and excursions that still allow tourists and aficionados to "ride the rails."
Category: History

South Dakota Railroads

Author : Mike Wiese
ISBN : 9781439631423
Genre : Transportation
File Size : 51.2 MB
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The arrival of the railroad in South Dakota is directly responsible for the population boom and town development the state experienced in the early 1900s. Enticed by the promise of opportunity, many immigrants and East Coast residents hopped on the train and headed west, many settling in South Dakota. Railroads opened the doorway and made the West what it has become. Using over 200 images, authors Mike Wiese and Tom Hayes take the reader on a historic tour of the depots, trains, and wrecks that defined South Dakota railroading in the early part of the 20th century. Drawing on their immense collections of images and postcards, they tell a story of railroad development and local history in South Dakota.
Category: Transportation

Toledo Railroads

Author : Kirk F. Hise
ISBN : 9780738533919
Genre : History
File Size : 39.7 MB
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The advent of the railroadÃ--a major mode of transportation and an important link to industryÃ--forged the interworkings of a nation, and especially the City of Toledo due to its location on the harbor. In 1850, rail companies began moving in, and Toledo soon became a central connecting point for railroads, bridging the gap between cities like Chicago and Cleveland and Detroit and Cincinnati, making coal available to cities everywhere. Just after the turn of the 20th century, there were 20 different railroads servicing Toledo with four different main stations, providing employment for the town and shaping its commerce and architecture. Today, many of the railroads have been lost to evolution of the city and mergers of the railroad. This book preserves their history through vintage images of trains, rail yards, stations, roundhouses, towers, bridges, and special trains.
Category: History