How Our Days Became Numbered

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How Our Days Became Numbered

Author : Dan Bouk
ISBN : 9780226259208
Genre : Science
File Size : 34.47 MB
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Long before the age of "Big Data" or the rise of today's "self-quantifiers," American capitalism embraced "risk"--and proceeded to number our days. Life insurers led the way, developing numerical practices for measuring individuals and groups, predicting their fates, and intervening in their futures. Emanating from the gilded boardrooms of Lower Manhattan and making their way into drawing rooms and tenement apartments across the nation, these practices soon came to change the futures they purported to divine. How Our Days Became Numbered tells a story of corporate culture remaking American culture--a story of intellectuals and professionals in and around insurance companies who reimagined Americans' lives through numbers and taught ordinary Americans to do the same. Making individuals statistical did not happen easily. Legislative battles raged over the propriety of discriminating by race or of smoothing away the effects of capitalism's fluctuations on individuals. Meanwhile, debates within companies set doctors against actuaries and agents, resulting in elaborate, secretive systems of surveillance and calculation. Dan Bouk reveals how, in a little over half a century, insurers laid the groundwork for the much-quantified, risk-infused world that we live in today. To understand how the financial world shapes modern bodies, how risk assessments can perpetuate inequalities of race or sex, and how the quantification and claims of risk on each of us continue to grow, we must take seriously the history of those who view our lives as a series of probabilities to be managed.
Category: Science

Fat In The Fifties

Author : Nicolas Rasmussen
ISBN : 9781421428727
Genre : Medical
File Size : 63.84 MB
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Metropolitan Life Insurance Company identified obesity as the leading cause of premature death in the United States in the 1930s, but it wasn't until 1951 that the public health and medical communities finally recognized it as "America's Number One Health Problem." The reason for MetLife's interest? They wanted their policyholders to live longer and continue paying their premiums. Early postwar America responded to the obesity emergency, but by the end of the 1960s, the crisis waned and official rates of true obesity were reduced— despite the fact that Americans were growing no thinner. What mid-century factors and forces established obesity as a politically meaningful and culturally resonant problem in the first place? And why did obesity fade from public—and medical—consciousness only a decade later? Based on archival records of health leaders as well as medical and popular literature, Fat in the Fifties is the first book to reconstruct the prewar origins, emergence, and surprising disappearance of obesity as a major public health problem. Author Nicolas Rasmussen explores the postwar shifts that drew attention to obesity, as well as the varied approaches to its treatment: from thyroid hormones to psychoanalysis and weight loss groups. Rasmussen argues that the US government was driven by the new Cold War and the fear of atomic annihilation to heightened anxieties about national fitness. Informed by the latest psychiatric thinking—which diagnosed obesity as the result of oral fixation, just like alcoholism—health professionals promoted a form of weight loss group therapy modeled on Alcoholics Anonymous. The intervention caught on like wildfire in 1950s suburbia. But the sense of crisis passed quickly, partly due to cultural changes associated with the later 1960s and partly due to scientific research, some of it sponsored by the sugar industry, emphasizing particular dietary fats, rather than calorie intake. Through this riveting history of the rise and fall of the obesity epidemic, readers gain an understanding of how the American public health system—ambitious, strong, and second-to-none at the end of the Second World War—was constrained a decade later to focus mainly on nagging individuals to change their lifestyle choices. Fat in the Fifties is required reading for public health practitioners and researchers, physicians, historians of medicine, and anyone concerned about weight and weight loss.
Category: Medical

Numbered Lives

Author : Jacqueline Wernimont
ISBN : 9780262350181
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 31.46 MB
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A feminist media history of quantification, uncovering the stories behind the tools and technologies we use to count, measure, and weigh our lives and realities. Anglo-American culture has used media to measure and quantify lives for centuries. Historical journal entries map the details of everyday life, while death registers put numbers to life's endings. Today we count our daily steps with fitness trackers and quantify births and deaths with digitized data. How are these present-day methods for measuring ourselves similar to those used in the past? In this book, Jacqueline Wernimont presents a new media history of western quantification, uncovering the stories behind the tools and technologies we use to count, measure, and weigh our lives and realities. Numbered Lives is the first book of its kind, a feminist media history that maps connections not only between past and present-day “quantum media” but between media tracking and long-standing systemic inequalities. Wernimont explores the history of the pedometer, mortality statistics, and the census in England and the United States to illuminate the entanglement of Anglo-American quantification with religious, imperial, and patriarchal paradigms. In Anglo-American culture, Wernimont argues, counting life and counting death are sides of the same coin—one that has always been used to render statistics of life and death more valuable to corporate and state organizations. Numbered Lives enumerates our shared media history, helping us understand our digital culture and inheritance.
Category: Social Science

Our Endless Numbered Days

Author : Claire Fuller
ISBN : 9780241969014
Genre : Fiction
File Size : 63.29 MB
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WINNER OF THE DESMOND ELLIOTT PRIZE 2015 'Fuller handles the tension masterfully in this grown-up thriller of a fairytale, full of clues, questions and intrigue' The Times 'Extraordinary. From the opening sentence it is gripping' Sunday Times 1976: Peggy Hillcoat is eight. She spends her summer camping with her father, playing her beloved record of The Railway Children and listening to her mother's grand piano, but her pretty life is about to change. Her survivalist father, who has been stockpiling provisions for the end which is surely coming soon, takes her from London to a cabin in a remote European forest. There he tells Peggy the rest of the world has disappeared. Her life is reduced to a piano which makes music but no sound, a forest where all that grows is a means of survival. And a tiny wooden hut that is Everything. 'Bewitching...a rivetingly dark tale...spellbinding' Sunday Express
Category: Fiction

The Captain Class Frigates In The Second World War

Author : Donald Collingwood
ISBN : 9781473812987
Genre : History
File Size : 39.12 MB
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This is the first book to fully document the story behind the Frigates that played such a vital role during World War Two.
Category: History

The President S House

Author : Margaret Truman
ISBN : 9780307417312
Genre : Young Adult Nonfiction
File Size : 30.3 MB
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As Margaret Truman knows from firsthand experience, living in the White House can be exhilarating and maddening, alarming and exhausting–but it is certainly never dull. Part private residence, part goldfish bowl, and part national shrine, the White House is both the most important address in America and the most intensely scrutinized. In this splendid blend of the personal and historic, Margaret Truman offers an unforgettable tour of “the president’s house” across the span of two centuries. Opened (though not finished) in 1800 and originally dubbed a “palace,” the White House has been fascinating from day one. In Thomas Jefferson’s day, it was a reeking construction site where congressmen complained of the hazards of open rubbish pits. Andrew Jackson’s supporters, descending twenty thousand strong from the backwoods of Kentucky and Tennessee, nearly destroyed the place during his first inaugural. Teddy Roosevelt expanded it, Jackie Kennedy and Pat Nixon redecorated it. Through all the vicissitudes of its history, the White House has transformed the characters, and often the fates, of its powerful occupants. In The President’s House, Margaret Truman takes us behind the scenes, into the deepest recesses and onto the airiest balconies, as she reveals what it feels like to live in the White House. Here are hilarious stories of Teddy Roosevelt’s rambunctious children tossing spitballs at presidential portraits–as well as a heartbreaking account of the tragedy that befell President Coolidge’s young son, Calvin, Jr. Here, too, is the real story of the Lincoln Bedroom and the thrilling narrative of how first lady Dolley Madison rescued a priceless portrait of George Washington and a copy of the Declaration of Independence before British soldiers torched the White House in 1814. Today the 132-room White House operates as an exotic combination of first-class hotel and fortress, with 1,600 dedicated workers, an annual budget over $1 billion, and a kitchen that can handle anything from an intimate dinner for four to a reception for 2,400. But ghosts of the past still walk its august corridors–including a phantom whose visit President Harry S Truman described to his daughter in eerie detail. From the basement swarming with reporters to the Situation Room crammed with sophisticated technology to the Oval Office where the president receives the world’s leaders, the White House is a beehive of relentless activity, deal-making, intrigue, gossip, and of course history in the making. In this evocative and insightful book, Margaret Truman combines high-stakes drama with the unique perspective of an insider. The ultimate guided tour of the nation’s most famous dwelling, The President’s House is truly a national treasure.
Category: Young Adult Nonfiction

A Concordance To The Canonical Books Of The Old And New Testament To Which Are Added A Concordance To The Books Called Apocrypha And A Concordance To The Psalter Contained In The Book Of Common Prayer The Preface Signed T B M I E Thomas B Murray The Concordance To The Bible And Apocrypha Compiled By T B Murray Michael Biggs And Others That To The Psalter By Charles Girdlestone

Author :
ISBN : BL:A0017091318
Genre : Bible
File Size : 37.57 MB
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Category: Bible

A Proper Job

Author : Brian Aherne
ISBN : STANFORD:36105034852363
Genre : Actors
File Size : 37.39 MB
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Category: Actors

Success Above Average

Author : Gabriel Anyanwu
ISBN : 9781491893166
Genre : Education
File Size : 52.5 MB
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There is great need for academic excellence today than ever before. No honour, award or accolade goes to the average person, but all sorts of opportunities and awards overtake the excellent performer. This book is will reveal some secrets you need to achieve success above average. You will learn: How to set goals for success How to fight the fears that keep you failing How to turn your positive believes into reality How to use your freedom wisely by developing the habit of discipline How to build wise associations that multiplies your success How to stay highly motivated for academic success and How to cultivate the right attitude for success Parents and teachers will learn: How to influence their children's success Why their previously intelligent children are now "dummies" and How to help them become successes again How to be their children's information distribution machine"
Category: Education

Hope For The Troubled Heart

Author : Billy Graham
ISBN : 9781418515706
Genre : Religion
File Size : 45.30 MB
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What hopeless situation troubles your heart? The death of a loved one? The memories of childhood abuse? The diagnosis of terminal illness? The strain of financial failure? A stormy marriage? A body wracked by pain? A lonely sense of emptiness? Into your hopeless situation comes beloved evangelist Billy Graham bearing God's gift of hope, one of the strongest "medicines" known to humanity, an amazing resource that "can cure nearly everything." Filled with unforgettable stories of real-life people and irrefutable lessons of biblical wisdom, Hope for the Troubled Heart inspires and encourages you with God's healing and strengthening truths. It shows you how to cope when your heart is breaking, how to pray through your pain, how to avoid the dark pit of resentment and bitterness, and how to be a comforter to others who hurt. You'll be reminded that "before we can grasp any meaning from suffering we must rest in God's unfailing love." And you'll find the "joy to be discovered in the midst of suffering." Here you'll learn how hope helps troubled hearts find peace.
Category: Religion

Echoes Of War

Author : Sir Bernard Lovell
ISBN : 0852743173
Genre : Science
File Size : 59.66 MB
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August 1939 was a time of great flux. The fear of impending war fueled by the aggression of Nazi Germany forced many changes. Young people pursuing academic research were plunged into an entirely different kind of research and development. For Bernard Lovell, the war meant involvement in one of the most vital research projects of the war-radar. Echoes of War: The Story of H2S Radar presents a passionate first-hand account of the development of the Home Sweet Home (H2S) radar systems during World War II. The book provides numerous personal insights into the scientific culture of wartime Britain and details the many personal sacrifices, setbacks, and eventual triumphs made by those actively involved. Bernard Lovell began his work on airborne interception radar in Taffy Bowen's airborne radar group. He was involved in the initial development of the application of the 10 centimeter cavity magnetron to airborne radar that revolutionized radar systems. In the autumn of 1941, the failure of Bomber Command to locate its target over the cloudy skies of Europe prompted the formation of a new group to develop a blind bombing system. Led by Lovell, this group developed the H2S radar system to identify towns and other targets at night or during heavy cloud cover. H2S first saw operational use with the Pathfinder Squadrons in the attack on Hamburg during the night of January 30-31, 1943. Two months later, modified H2S units installed in Coastal Command aircraft operating over the Bay of Biscay had a dramatic tactical effect on the air war against U-boats. The tide had begun to turn. In this fascinating chronicle of the H2S radar project, Sir Bernard Lovell recreates the feel and mood of the wartime years.
Category: Science

Ala Bulletin

Author :
ISBN : UCAL:$B225458
Genre :
File Size : 65.94 MB
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