DEPORTATION NATION OUTSIDERS IN AMERICAN HISTORY

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Deportation Nation

Author : Dan Kanstroom
ISBN : 0674024729
Genre : History
File Size : 33.20 MB
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Deportation Nation is a history of communal self-idealization and self-protection. It aims to answer two fundamental questions: how should we understand deportation and what are the antecedents of our current deportation system?" "Daniel Kanstroom argues that deportation has always been a way not only to manage immigration but also to control noncitizens' lives. It has become a crude and inefficient legal tool in ill-defined "wars" on terror and crime. Deportation Nation illuminates shadowed corners of American history, and demands more attention to hard problems of immigration, law, and human rights in a globalized but often xenophobic world."--Résumé de l'éditeur.
Category: History

Aftermath

Author : Dan Kanstroom
ISBN : 9780199742721
Genre : Law
File Size : 77.37 MB
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Examines the current deportation system in the United States, the aftermath effects, and the political, social and legal issues.
Category: Law

Asian American History Day By Day A Reference Guide To Events

Author : Jonathan H. X. Lee
ISBN : 9780313399282
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 89.13 MB
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An accessible and ready reference for student research, this day-by-day guide highlights the importance of Asian Americans in U.S. history, highlighting the impact of specific individuals and this large ethnic group as a whole across time and documenting the evolution of policies, issues, and feelings concerning this particular American population. • Provides detailed information throughout history on the events, people, and places of Asian American history • Presents a unique calendar approach to recognizing the contributions of this significant ethnic demographic throughout U.S. history that demonstrates how all 365 days of the year can feature an achievement made by Asian Americans • Offers information on celebrities, inventors, events, and more that relate to Asian American life in the United States
Category: Social Science

The New Deportations Delirium

Author : Daniel Kanstroom
ISBN : 9781479868674
Genre : Law
File Size : 76.14 MB
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Since 1996, when the deportation laws were hardened, millions of migrants to the U.S., including many long-term legal permanent residents with “green cards,” have experienced summary arrest, incarceration without bail, transfer to remote detention facilities, and deportation without counsel—a life-time banishment from what is, in many cases, the only country they have ever known. U.S.-based families and communities face the loss of a worker, neighbor, spouse, parent, or child. Many of the deported are “sentenced home” to a country which they only knew as an infant, whose language they do not speak, or where a family lives in extreme poverty or indebtedness for not yet being able to pay the costs of their previous migration. But what does this actually look like and what are the systems and processes and who are the people who are enforcing deportation policies and practices? The New Deportations Delirium responds to these questions. Taken as a whole, the volume raises consciousness about the complexities of the issues and argues for the interdisciplinary dialogue and response. Over the course of the book, deportation policy is debated by lawyers, judges, social workers, researchers, and clinical and community psychologists as well as educators, researchers, and community activists. The New Deportations Delirium presents a fresh conversation and urges a holistic response to the complex realities facing not only migrants but also the wider U.S. society in which they have sought a better life.
Category: Law

Immigrants In American History

Author : Elliott Robert Barkan
ISBN : 9781598842197
Genre : History
File Size : 37.56 MB
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This encyclopedia is a unique collection of entries covering the arrival, adaptation, and integration of immigrants into American culture from the 1500s to 2010. * Recent immigration and naturalization data from the 2010 U.S. Census * Excerpts from American laws and customs * A chronology of migration to the United States between 1500 to 2010
Category: History

Unruly Equality

Author : Andrew Cornell
ISBN : 9780520286733
Genre : History
File Size : 74.10 MB
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"In this highly accessible social and intellectual history of American anarchism in the United States, Andrew Cornell reveals an amazing continuity and development across the twentieth century. Far from fading away, anarchists dealt with major events such as the rise of Communism, the New Deal, atomic warfare, the black freedom struggle, and a succession of artistic avant-gardes stretching from 1915 to 1975. This book traces U.S. anarchism as it evolved from the creed of poor immigrants militantly opposed to capitalism early in the twentieth century to one that today sees resurgent appeal among middle-class youth and foregrounds ecology, feminism, and opposition to cultural alienation"--Provided by publisher.
Category: History

National Insecurities

Author : Deirdre M. Moloney
ISBN : 9780807882610
Genre : History
File Size : 43.88 MB
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For over a century, deportation and exclusion have defined eligibility for citizenship in the United States and, in turn, have shaped what it means to be American. In this broad analysis of policy from 1882 to present, Deirdre Moloney places current debates about immigration issues in historical context. Focusing on several ethnic groups, Moloney closely examines how gender and race led to differences in the implementation of U.S. immigration policy as well as how poverty, sexuality, health, and ideologies were regulated at the borders. Emphasizing the perspectives of immigrants and their advocates, Moloney weaves in details from case files that illustrate the impact policy decisions had on individual lives. She explores the role of immigration policy in diplomatic relations between the U.S. and other nations, and shows how federal, state, and local agencies had often conflicting priorities and approaches to immigration control. Throughout, Moloney traces the ways that these policy debates contributed to a modern understanding of citizenship and human rights in the twentieth century and even today.
Category: History

Echoes Of Mutiny

Author : Seema Sohi
ISBN : 9780199390441
Genre : History
File Size : 31.79 MB
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How did thousands of Indians who migrated to the Pacific Coast of North America during the early twentieth century come to forge an anticolonial movement that British authorities claimed nearly toppled their rule in India during the First World War? Seema Sohi traces how Indian labor migrants, students, and intellectual activists who journeyed across the globe seeking to escape the exploitative and politically repressive policies of the British Raj, linked restrictive immigration policies and political repression in North America to colonial subjugation at home. In the process, they developed an international anticolonial consciousness that boldly confronted the British and American empires. Hoping to become an important symbol for those battling against racial oppression and colonial subjugation across the world, Indian anticolonialists also provoked a global inter-imperial collaboration between U.S. and British officials to repress anticolonial revolt. They symbolized the hope of the world's racialized subjects and the fears of those who worried about the global disorder they could portend. Echoes of Mutiny provides an in-depth and transnational look at the deeply intertwined relationship between anti-Asian racism, Indian anticolonialism, and state antiradicalism in early twentieth century U.S. and global history. Through extensive archival research, Sohi uncovers the dialectical relationship between the rise of Indian anticolonialism and state repression in North America and demonstrates how Indian anticolonialists served as catalysts for the implementation of restrictive U.S. immigration and antiradical laws as well as the expansion of state power in early twentieth century India and America. Indian migrants came to understand their struggles against racial exclusion and political repression in North America as part of a broader movement against white supremacy and colonialism and articulated radical visions of anticolonialism that called not only for the end of British rule in India but the forging of democracies across the world.
Category: History

Constructing Immigrant Illegality

Author : Cecilia Menjívar
ISBN : 9781107041592
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 53.82 MB
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The topic of "illegal" immigration has been a major aspect of public discourse in the United States and many other immigrant-receiving countries. From the beginning of its modern invocation in the early twentieth century, the often ill-defined epithet of human "illegality" has figured prominently in the media; in vigorous public debates at the national, state, and local levels; and in presidential campaigns. In this collection of essays, contributors from a variety of disciplines - anthropology, law, political science, religious studies, and sociology - examine how immigration law shapes immigrant illegality, how the concept of immigrant illegality is deployed and lived, and how its power is wielded and resisted. The authors conclude that the current concept of immigrant illegality is in need of sustained critique, as careful analysis will aid policy discussions and lead to more just solutions.
Category: Political Science

Religion The Secular And The Politics Of Sexual Difference

Author : Linell E. Cady
ISBN : 9780231536042
Genre : Religion
File Size : 77.25 MB
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Global struggles over women's roles, rights, and dress increasingly cast the secular and the religious in tense if not violent opposition. When advocates for equality speak in terms of rights and modern progress, or reactionaries ground their authority in religious and scriptural appeals, both tend to presume women's emancipation is ineluctably tied to secularization. Religion, the Secular, and the Politics of Sexual Difference upsets this certainty by drawing on diverse voices and traditions in studies that historicize, question, and test the implicit links between secularism and expanded freedoms for women. Rather than position secularism as the answer to conflicts over gender and sexuality, this volume shows both religion and the secular collaborate in creating the conditions that generate them.
Category: Religion