DEGAS DRAWINGS OF DANCERS

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Degas Drawings Of Dancers

Author : Edgar Degas
ISBN : 9780486141664
Genre : Art
File Size : 61.15 MB
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Forty-one full-page, six half-page drawings depict dancers on stage, in the classroom, and at rehearsals. Charming, spirited views of dancers pirouetting, executing grand battements and ports de bras, practicing at the barre, and more.
Category: Art

Degas Dance Drawing

Author : Paul Valéry
ISBN : PSU:000013290146
Genre :
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Degas Drawings

Author : Edgar Degas
ISBN : 9780486212333
Genre : Art
File Size : 71.85 MB
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One hundred works illustrate the French artist's techniques, concerns, and delicate style
Category: Art

Degas

Author : Edgar Degas
ISBN : UOM:39015015682340
Genre :
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Degas And The Dance

Author : Jill Devonyar
ISBN : 1885444265
Genre : Art
File Size : 22.85 MB
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Seeks to illuminate the themes present in the artist's works, presenting new material about Degas's highly informed relationship with the ballet of the nineteenth century.
Category: Art

Edgar Degas

Author : Nathalia Brodskaya
ISBN : 9781780427454
Genre : Art
File Size : 57.93 MB
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Degas was closest to Renoir in the impressionist’s circle, for both favoured the animated Parisian life of their day as a motif in their paintings. Degas did not attend Gleyre’s studio; most likely he first met the future impressionists at the Café Guerbois. He started his apprenticeship in 1853 at the studio of Louis-Ernest Barrias and, beginning in 1854, studied under Louis Lamothe, who revered Ingres above all others, and transmitted his adoration for this master to Edgar Degas. Starting in 1854 Degas travelled frequently to Italy: first to Naples, where he made the acquaintance of his numerous cousins, and then to Rome and Florence, where he copied tirelessly from the Old Masters. His drawings and sketches already revealed very clear preferences: Raphael, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Mantegna, but also Benozzo Gozzoli, Ghirlandaio, Titian, Fra Angelico, Uccello, and Botticelli. During the 1860s and 1870s he became a painter of racecourses, horses and jockeys. His fabulous painter’s memory retained the particularities of movement of horses wherever he saw them. After his first rather complex compositions depicting racecourses, Degas learned the art of translating the nobility and elegance of horses, their nervous movements, and the formal beauty of their musculature. Around the middle of the 1860s Degas made yet another discovery. In 1866 he painted his first composition with ballet as a subject, Mademoiselle Fiocre dans le ballet de la Source (Mademoiselle Fiocre in the Ballet ‘The Spring’) (New York, Brooklyn Museum). Degas had always been a devotee of the theatre, but from now on it would become more and more the focus of his art. Degas’ first painting devoted solely to the ballet was Le Foyer de la danse à l’Opéra de la rue Le Peletier (The Dancing Anteroom at the Opera on Rue Le Peletier) (Paris, Musée d’Orsay). In a carefully constructed composition, with groups of figures balancing one another to the left and the right, each ballet dancer is involved in her own activity, each one is moving in a separate manner from the others. Extended observation and an immense number of sketches were essential to executing such a task. This is why Degas moved from the theatre on to the rehearsal halls, where the dancers practised and took their lessons. This was how Degas arrived at the second sphere of that immediate, everyday life that was to interest him. The ballet would remain his passion until the end of his days.
Category: Art

Degas And The Dance

Author : Susan Goldman Rubin
ISBN : 0810905671
Genre : Juvenile Nonfiction
File Size : 46.83 MB
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A brilliantly illustrated book examines the behind-the-scenes inspirations that led to the creation of more than 30 paintings and drawings by Degas featuring a diverse ensemble of ballerinas, from little girls practicing to performing prima ballerinas.
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Edgar Degas Drawings In Close Up

Author : Annabelle Thornhill
ISBN : 9782765907558
Genre : Art
File Size : 64.12 MB
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Like the Impressionists, Degas sought to capture fleeting moments in the flow of modern life, yet he showed little interest in painting plain air landscapes, favoring scenes in theaters and cafes illuminated by artificial light, which he used to clarify the contours of his figures, adhering to his Academic training. He is especially identified with the subject of dance; more than half of his works depict dancers. He also was a superb draftsman, and particularly masterful in depicting movement, as can be seen in his interpretations of dancers and female nudes. His portraits are notable for their psychological complexity and for their portrayal of human isolation.
Category: Art

Degas Dancers

Author : Richard Kendall
ISBN : UOM:39015040705454
Genre : Art
File Size : 88.4 MB
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Shows and discusses selected Degas drawings, pastels, prints, paintings, and sculptures of ballet dancers
Category: Art

Edgar Degas Paintings In Close Up

Author : Annabelle Thornhill
ISBN : 9782765907565
Genre : Art
File Size : 83.17 MB
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Edgar Degas seems never to have reconciled himself to the label of "Impressionist," preferring to call himself a "Realist" or "Independent." Nevertheless, he was one of the group’s founders, an organizer of its exhibitions, and one of its most important core members. Like the Impressionists, he sought to capture fleeting moments in the flow of modern life, yet he showed little interest in painting plain air landscapes, favoring scenes in theaters and cafes illuminated by artificial light, which he used to clarify the contours of his figures, adhering to his Academic training. He is especially identified with the subject of dance; more than half of his works depict dancers. He also was a superb draftsman, and particularly masterful in depicting movement, as can be seen in his interpretations of dancers and female nudes. His portraits are notable for their psychological complexity and for their portrayal of human isolation.
Category: Art