DECOLONIZING EXTINCTION

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Decolonizing Extinction

Author : Juno Salazar Parreñas
ISBN : 0822370778
Genre : History
File Size : 65.96 MB
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Juno Salazar Parreñas traces the ways in which colonialism and decolonization shape relations between humans and nonhumans at a Malaysian orangutan rehabilitation center, contending that considering rehabilitation from an orangutan perspective will shift conservation biology from ultimately violent investments in population growth and toward a feminist sense of welfare.
Category: History

Decolonizing Nature

Author : William (Bill) Adams
ISBN : 9781136568619
Genre : Nature
File Size : 30.99 MB
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British imperialism was almost unparalleled in its historical and geographical reach, leaving a legacy of entrenched social transformation in nations and cultures in every part of the globe. Colonial annexation and government were based on an all-encompassing system that integrated and controlled political, economic, social and ethnic relations, and required a similar annexation and control of natural resources and nature itself. Colonial ideologies were expressed not only in the progressive exploitation of nature but also in the emerging discourses of conservation. At the start of the 21st century, the conservation of nature is of undiminished importance in post-colonial societies, yet the legacy of colonial thinking endures. What should conservation look like today, and what (indeed, whose) ideas should it be based upon? Decolonizing Nature explores the influence of the colonial legacy on contemporary conservation and on ideas about the relationships between people, polities and nature in countries and cultures that were once part of the British Empire. It locates the historical development of the theory and practice of conservation - at both the periphery and the centre - firmly within the context of this legacy, and considers its significance today. It highlights the present and future challenges to conservationists of contemporary global neo-colonialism The contributors to this volume include both academics and conservation practitioners. They provide wide-ranging and insightful perspectives on the need for, and practical ways to achieve new forms of informed ethical engagement between people and nature.
Category: Nature

Decolonizing Development

Author : Joel Wainwright
ISBN : 9781444399790
Genre : Science
File Size : 26.45 MB
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Winner of the 2010 James M. Blaut Award in recognition of innovative scholarship in cultural and political ecology (Honors of the CAPE specialty group (Cultural and Political Ecology)) Decolonizing Development investigates the ways colonialism shaped the modern world by analyzing the relationship between colonialism and development as forms of power. Based on novel interpretations of postcolonial and Marxist theory and applied to original research data Amply supplemented with maps and illustrations An intriguing and invaluable resource for scholars of postcolonialism, development, geography, and the Maya
Category: Science

How Nature Works

Author : Sarah Besky
ISBN : 9780826360861
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 28.45 MB
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We now live on a planet that is troubled—even overworked—in ways that compel us to reckon with inherited common sense about the relationship between human labor and nonhuman nature. In Paraguay, fast-growing soy plants are displacing both prior crops and people. In Malaysia, dispossessed farmers are training captive orangutans to earn their own meals. In India, a prized dairy cow suddenly refuses to give more milk. Built from these sorts of scenes and sites, where the ultimate subjects and agents of work are ambiguous, How Nature Works develops an anthropology of labor that is sharply attuned to the irreversible effects of climate change, extinction, and deforestation. The authors of this volume push ethnographic inquiry beyond the anthropocentric documentation of human work on nature in order to develop a language for thinking about how all labor is a collective ecological act.
Category: Social Science

Decolonizing Development

Author : Joel David Wainwright
ISBN : MINN:31951P00831907M
Genre : Economic development
File Size : 89.98 MB
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Category: Economic development

Decolonizing Museums

Author : Amy Lonetree
ISBN : 9780807837528
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 39.53 MB
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Museum exhibitions focusing on Native American history have long been curator controlled. However, a shift is occurring, giving Indigenous people a larger role in determining exhibition content. In Decolonizing Museums, Amy Lonetree examines the complexities of these new relationships with an eye toward exploring how museums can grapple with centuries of unresolved trauma as they tell the stories of Native peoples. She investigates how museums can honor an Indigenous worldview and way of knowing, challenge stereotypical representations, and speak the hard truths of colonization within exhibition spaces to address the persistent legacies of historical unresolved grief in Native communities. Lonetree focuses on the representation of Native Americans in exhibitions at the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian, the Mille Lacs Indian Museum in Minnesota, and the Ziibiwing Center of Anishinabe Culture and Lifeways in Michigan. Drawing on her experiences as an Indigenous scholar and museum professional, Lonetree analyzes exhibition texts and images, records of exhibition development, and interviews with staff members. She addresses historical and contemporary museum practices and charts possible paths for the future curation and presentation of Native lifeways.
Category: Social Science

Decolonizing International Relations

Author : Branwen Gruffydd Jones
ISBN : 9780742576469
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 36.87 MB
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The modern discipline of International Relations (IR) is largely an Anglo-American social science. It has been concerned mainly with the powerful states and actors in the global political economy and dominated by North American and European scholars. However, this focus can be seen as Eurocentrism. Decolonizing International Relations exposes the ways in which IR has consistently ignored questions of colonialism, imperialism, race, slavery, and dispossession in the non-European world. The first part of the book addresses the form and historical origins of Eurocentrism in IR. The second part examines the colonial and racialized constitution of international relations, which tends to be ignored by the discipline. The third part begins the task of retrieval and reconstruction, providing non-Eurocentric accounts of selected themes central to international relations. Critical scholars in IR and international law, concerned with the need to decolonize knowledge, have authored the chapters of this important volume. It will appeal to students and scholars of international relations, international law, and political economy, as well as those with a special interest in the politics of knowledge, postcolonial critique, international and regional historiography, and comparative politics. Contributions by: Antony Anghie, Alison J. Ayers, B. S. Chimni, James Thuo Gathii, Siba N'Zatioula Grovogui, Branwen Gruffydd Jones, Sandra Halperin, Sankaran Krishna, Mustapha Kamal Pasha, and Julian Saurin
Category: Political Science

Decolonizing Cultures In The Pacific

Author : Susan Y. Najita
ISBN : 9781134211715
Genre : Literary Criticism
File Size : 65.63 MB
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In Decolonizing Cultures in the Pacific, Susan Y. Najita proposes that the traumatic history of contact and colonization has become a crucial means by which indigenous peoples of Oceania are reclaiming their cultures, languages, ways of knowing, and political independence. In particular, she examines how contemporary writers from Hawai‘i, Samoa, and Aotearoa/New Zealand remember, re-tell, and deploy this violent history in their work. As Pacific peoples negotiate their paths towards sovereignty and chart their postcolonial futures, these writers play an invaluable role in invoking and commenting upon the various uses of the histories of colonial resistance, allowing themselves and their readers to imagine new futures by exorcising the past. Decolonizing Cultures in the Pacific is a valuable addition to the fields of Pacific and Postcolonial Studies and also contributes to struggles for cultural decolonization in Oceania: contemporary writers’ critical engagement with colonialism and indigenous culture, Najita argues, provides a powerful tool for navigating a decolonized future.
Category: Literary Criticism

Decolonizing Literacy

Author : Gregorio Hernandez-Zamora
ISBN : NWU:35556039997127
Genre : Education
File Size : 42.7 MB
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Drawing from case studies of marginalized individuals in Mexico and the U.S., this book explores the colonizing concept of illiteracy, as well as how the long social history of conquest and colonization, plunder and globalization, is inscribed in the personal histories of today s global outcasts. "
Category: Education

Decolonization In South Asia

Author : Sekhar Bandyopadhyay
ISBN : 9781134018239
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 39.66 MB
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This book explores the meanings and complexities of India’s experience of transition from colonial to the post-colonial period. It focuses on the first five years – from independence on 15th August 1947 to the first general election in January 1952 – in the politics of West Bengal, the new Indian province that was created as a result of the Partition. The author, a specialist on the history of modern India, discusses what freedom actually meant to various individuals, communities and political parties, how they responded to it, how they extended its meaning and how in their anxiety to confront the realities of free India, they began to invent new enemies of their newly acquired freedom. By emphasising the representations of popular mentality rather than the institutional changes brought in by the process of decolonization, he draws attention to other concerns and anxieties that were related to the problems of coming to terms with the newly achieved freedom and the responsibility of devising independent rules of governance that would suit the historic needs of a pluralist nation. Decolonization in South Asia analyses the transitional politics of West Bengal in light of recent developments in postcolonial theory on nationalism, treating the ‘nation’ as a space for contestation, rather than a natural breeding ground for homogeneity in the complex political scenario of post-independence India. It will appeal to academics interested in political science, sociology, social anthropology and cultural and Asian studies.
Category: Political Science