CSS IN DEPTH

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Css In Depth

Author : Keith J. Grant
ISBN : 1617293458
Genre :
File Size : 71.23 MB
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CSS lets programmers precisely specify the visual design of a web page or web app, from the structural layout of elements on the page to their individual look and feel. CSS in Depth takes web developers from beginner to advanced. In this book, they will revisit concepts that they are likely familiar with but have not completely mastered. Purchase of the print book includes a free eBook in PDF, Kindle, and ePub formats from Manning Publications.
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Microsoft Expression Web 4 In Depth

Author : Jim Cheshire
ISBN : 9780132953559
Genre : Computers
File Size : 86.55 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
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Do more with Microsoft Expression Web 4 SP2—in less time! This is the world’s most expert, complete, and practical guide to succeeding with Expression Web 4 SP2! Microsoft insider Jim Cheshire presents today’s best solutions for everything you need to do with Expression Web 4 SP2 and its brand-new HTML5, CSS3, and jQuery tools!. Create, edit, and manage content… implement leading-edge designs… integrate dynamic content… add powerful features with no custom coding… leverage SP2’s latest time-saving features…do the job right, and do it fast! “In the trenches” solutions, big-picture insights, real examples, time-saving shortcuts Boost productivity with custom workspaces, Snapshot & Snippet panels, Universal Commenting, and other SP2 improvements Optimize every phase of development, from site creation through reporting Use Expression Web 4 features together to solve real web design problems and achieve real business goals Build HTML5/CSS3 standards-compliant sites that work properly in any modern browser Learn high-efficiency techniques for using tables, forms, and QuickTags Add more dynamic, interactive content with Behaviors and Layers Differentiate your site with dynamic components and client-side JavaScript Use ASP.NET’s simple tools to display, edit, and manage data without custom code Develop accessible, Section 508- or WCAG-compliant sites Efficiently test sites and apps with SP2’s enhanced SuperPreview and remote browsing Easily password-protect content with ASP.NET Login controls and membership features Leverage Expression Web’s updated PHP 5.3 support, including module IntelliSense and “Open as PHP” Efficiently troubleshoot any site development problem Register your book at www.quepublishing.com/title/9780789749192 to get the entire book in searchable PDF format, including all examples and sample files, plus a bonus four-chapter mini book on creating add-ins with JavaScript and HTML!
Category: Computers

Dreamweaver Cs4

Author : David McFarland
ISBN : 9780596522926
Genre : Computers
File Size : 35.4 MB
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A guide to the Web design program covers such topics as text formatting, Cascading Style Sheets, links, images, tables, page layout, HTML, forms, and site management.
Category: Computers

Cascading Style Sheets Css By Example

Author : Steven E. Callihan
ISBN : 0789726173
Genre : Computers
File Size : 69.27 MB
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Reviews Web design fundamentals while reviewing the capabilities of Cascading Style Sheets and their impact upon Web design.
Category: Computers

Dreamweaver Cs3 The Missing Manual

Author : David Sawyer McFarland
ISBN : 0596554486
Genre : Computers
File Size : 86.65 MB
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Welcome to Dreamweaver CS3. This new version of the popular web design software offers a rich environment for building professional sites, with drag-and-drop simplicity, clean HTML code, and dynamic database-driven web site creation tools. Moreover, it's now integrated more tightly with Adobe's other products: Photoshop, InDesign, Flash, and their siblings. But with such sophisticated features, the software isn't simple. So say hello to Dreamweaver CS3: The Missing Manual, the fifth edition of this bestselling book by experienced web site trainer and author David McFarland. This book helps both first-time and experienced web designers bring stunning, interactive web sites to life. With jargon-free language and clear descriptions, this new edition addresses both beginners who need step-by-step guidance as well as long-time Dreamweaver users who need a handy reference to address the inner-workings of the program. Dreamweaver CS3: The Missing Manual teaches designers how to construct and manage web sites by examining web-page components and Dreamweaver's capabilities through "live examples". With a complete A-Z guide to designing, organizing, building and deploying a web site for those with no web design experience, this book: Takes you through the basics to advanced techniques to control the appearance of your web pages with CSS Shows you how to design dynamic database-driven web sites, from blogs to product catalogs, and from shopping carts to newsletter signup forms Teaches you how to master your web site, and manage thousands of pages effortlessly Witty and objective, Dreamweaver CS3: The Missing Manual is a must for anyone who uses this highly popular program, from beginners to professionals. Altogether, it's the ultimate atlas for Dreamweaver CS3.
Category: Computers

Plug In Javascript 100 Power Solutions

Author : Robin Nixon
ISBN : 9780071738620
Genre : Computers
File Size : 71.34 MB
Format : PDF
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100 JavaScript power solutions in one handy guide This practical resource contains 100 ready-to-run JavaScript plug-ins you can use to create dynamic Web content. The book begins by explaining JavaScript, Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), and the Document Object Model (DOM). Then, each chapter in Plug-In JavaScript offers complete, working examples for specific end results you can achieve right away. Using these plug-ins, you'll be able to build JavaScript projects quicker and easier than ever, as many complex tasks are reduced to a single function call. Get ready-made JavaScript plug-ins for: Resizing and repositioning objects Fading between objects Movement and animation Chaining and interaction Menus and navigation Text effects Audio and visual effects Cookies, Ajax, and security Forms and validation And much more Download all of the plug-ins at the book's companion website.
Category: Computers

Developing Mobile Web Arcgis Applications

Author : Matthew Sheehan
ISBN : 9781784392000
Genre : Computers
File Size : 64.25 MB
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This guide is invaluable to those just starting out with GIS development but will also benefit GIS professionals wishing to expand their development skills to include mobile apps.
Category: Computers

Html Css For Beginners Your Step By Step Guide To Easily Html Css Programming In 7 Days

Author : i Code Academy
ISBN : 9781386695349
Genre : Computers
File Size : 53.57 MB
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Are You Ready To Learn HTML & CSS Easily? HTML is an acronym for Hyper Text Mark-Up Language. It is the main programming language used to develop websites. It acts as a framework of sorts where different elements like color, video, images, flash animation, etc. could be added later on. Back in the day, website creation and development would only go as far as one's imagination. Website developers of yesteryears had to get specialized education just to be able to learn a programming language and start developing websites, applications, etc. This was an extremely grueling process and would often times become the deterring factor for students. However, when HTML was introduced, website creation and develop got a whole lot easier. This book will help you understand HTML's syntax and semantics, which will allow you to create a website completely from scratch. We'll teach you how to lay down the foundations—the backbone—of a website and then add aesthetic elements later on using Cascading Style Sheets or what's commonly known as CSS. Here's What You'll Learn From This HTML & CSS For Beginners Book: ✓ Introduction ✓ HTML Fundamentals ✓ HTML Fundamentals 2 ✓ HTML Fundamentals 3 ✓ CSS In-depth and much more What Are You Waiting For? Start Coding HTML & CSS Right Now! ​
Category: Computers

Programming For Beginners

Author : iCode Academy
ISBN : 1520676085
Genre :
File Size : 66.78 MB
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In this book you will learn:- Everything you need to know about Python: from "Python Syntax "and "The Loops" to "Coding a Full Program".You will learn:- Everything you need to know about Java: from the "Conditional Statements" to "Interfaces and Inheritance"You will learn:- Everything you need to know about Html & CSS: "The Fundamentals 1,2,3" of Html and CSS in depth
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Core Css

Author : Keith Schengili-Roberts
ISBN : 0130092789
Genre : Computers
File Size : 36.46 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
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Preface Welcome to the second edition of Core CSS. When the initial edition came out in 2000, while CSS had been around for a few years, it was largely underutilized on the Web. And there was a good reason for this: browser support for CSS properties was, to put it kindly, "spotty." In the past few years things have changed substantially: the Mozilla project pushed for a standards-compliant rendering engine—including CSS—that has since been incorporated into the most recent versions of Netscape Navigator; and Internet Explorer 5.0 and later 6.0 made real advances in supporting CSS properties. As older, non-CSS-compliant browsers fade into the background, Web design has advanced accordingly and is beginning to take full advantage of the formatting possibilities that CSS opens up for both eye-popping and better functioning Web sites. While the browser manufacturers have been playing "catch-up" and have largely (with some notable exceptions) instituted the CSS1 and CSS2 standards devised by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), the W3C has not stood still. While still in draft status, the various modules that will one day comprise the CSS3 specification are well on the way towards providing a comprehensive set of tools for Web authors seeking to format just about anything and everything you can think of that has to do with a Web page. While none of these CSS3 modules have been finalized—and things may still change substantially—many of the new directions that are being charted by the W3C in this area are covered in this book as a "heads up" as to what future Web developers can come to expect. One of the original reasons behind the creation of CSS was to prevent competing browsers developers from the runaway development of new HTML tags that only worked in their particular browser. This has seemingly not stopped the temptation by browser manufacturers to continue to "push the envelope," and in particular, recent versions of Microsoft's Internet Explorer have included a number of browser-specific CSS properties. These are covered in the various sections of the book, both out of a sense of completeness as well as wanting to provide readers who may be working in a "closed-shop" environment (i.e., where they know that their clients are all using this browser) with information they can genuinely use. As a member of the W3C, Microsoft is also helping to chart the progress of the future CSS development, and many as yet browser-specific CSS properties may not be so in the future. When I am asked why I write computer books, I usually respond that I write books I wished already existed that I could use daily in my work. A number of books have appeared since the first edition of Core CSS came out, but none of them have been as comprehensive—especially when it came to covering CSS2 or Internet Explorer properties—as I would have liked. The majority of the code in the first book has been completely re-written for this edition, and dozens more examples better show what particular CSS properties can do and how they work—or do not work—in modern browsers. Who You Are You are a Web author who is looking to expand the capabilities of your Web pages. You know that CSS opens the doors to a wide range of possibilities, but want to learn more about how to make the most of it. Or perhaps you know that CSS will solve some of your most pernicious Web formatting problems, but shy away from using it because you have heard that it can produce varying results when viewed under different browsers or under different operating systems. Maybe you are looking for a single source that tells you what you need to know about a property at a glance, instead of having to traverse a dozen Web sites to get the same information. If you fit any of these circumstances, then this book is for you. This book takes a practical, pragmatic look at the current state of affairs regarding CSS and guides the reader through how CSS works. This book provides the information Web authors need in order to understand not only how CSS should work, but also how it actually works in current major browsers. It does not confine itself only to one operating system, but takes a look at how CSS works under browsers working under multiple operating systems. With this knowledge, Web authors will know which CSS properties are "safe" for use, and which to avoid. More than that though, this book also provides information as to the future of CSS with an in-depth look at what will likely prove to be the foundation of the future CSS3 specification. You do not have to be an expert at understanding how Web pages work, but the book does assume you have a basic understanding of both HTML and the Web. The book assumes no prior knowledge of CSS. It will not only serve those Web authors who are just starting out using CSS, but also act as a handy reference for those occasions when you need to look up how a particular CSS property works. How This Book Is Organized The first edition of this book separated CSS1 and CSS2 properties. Now that much of CSS2 has been adopted within the major browsers, it no longer made sense to keep things separate. This has been extended further to include draft CSS3 properties into the (sometimes rough) families of properties to which they belong. While these properties are not currently in use—and some of them may not end up looking the same as they do in this book when they are finally released—they are important as an indicator of the way CSS development is progressing, so that forwardlooking Web authors can get a heads up. The CSS3 properties outlined here are my "best guesses" based on my own Web-authoring experience. In some cases there are wholly separate chapters devoted to Internet Explorer-only CSS properties, but many of them fall into already-defined families of properties and are included in those chapters. In addition to all of the chapters in this book are some appendices designed to provide the Web author with quick reference material to have on hand when writing CSS code. Chapter 1 ("The Birth of CSS") explores how CSS in its current form came to be. The following two chapters (Chapter 2, "(X)HTML and Its Relationship to CSS" and Chapter 3, "Browser Adoption of CSS") provide information on how CSS can be accessed within Web page code, and how the major browser manufacturers have increasingly adopted CSS within their browsers. Chapter 4 ("Implementation of Basic CSS Concepts") looks at how some of the basic concepts behind CSS—such as inheritance, grouping CSS code and cascading rules—are implemented in the major browsers. Chapters 5 and 6 ("The Cascade" and "CSS Units," respectively) extend this concept further by looking at how the "C" of "CSS" works, and explains the many different fundamental units of measure that can be used in conjunction with certain CSS properties. Chapter 7 ("Pseudo-Classes and Pseudo-Elements") looks at how these CSS elements which allow for special or conditional types of formatting can be utilized. Chapter 8 ("Media Types and Media Queries") introduces the concept of media types and examines how Web pages can be modified so that they can be displayed through such things as print or "talking browsers." Chapters 9 and 10 ("Font Properties" and "Text Properties") begin the "meat and potatoes" part of the book for most readers, looking in detail at the properties used daily by an increasing number of Web authors. Chapter 11 ("Text Property Extensions") is the first chapter devoted wholly to Internet Explorer-specific properties, most of which are aimed at formatting Web pages for an international audience. Chapter 12 ("Box Properties") brings us back to the "meat and potatoes" area of CSS formatting, explaining in detail the box set CSS properties, which can determine how a wide variety of Web elements such as headers, images and paragraphs can be enhanced. The topic of Chapter 13 ("Color") used to be part of the background family of properties, but the draft CSS3 module has charted a new course for using color on the Web, all of which is looked at in this section. Background properties—including a number of draft CSS innovations in this area—are covered in Chapter 14 ("Background Properties"). Chapter 15 ("Classification Properties and Generated/Automatic Content") is the start of what for many readers will be the more esoteric uses to which CSS can be put to, and yet represents much of where the real rendering power behind CSS lies. This chapter looks at how its functions enable Web authors to control and enhance content that is automatically generated by the browser, including such things as the numbering and display of lists. Chapter 16 ("Visual Formatting and Detailed Visual Formatting") represents the core of what is popularly known as the "CSS positioning" properties. Chapter 17 ("Visual Effects") looks primarily at properties designed to produce stunning effects using dynamic code. Chapter 18 ("Paged Media") explores those properties related to crafting Web pages so that they can be printed (rather than displayed on a screen) in the precise way that a Web author desires. Chapter 19 ("Tables") looks at the somewhat rag-tag collection of table-related formatting properties, but then rounds off the chapter by looking at ways of creating table-like formatting structures using only CSS. In addition to covering what is already possible to do with user-interface properties in Chapter 20 ("User Interface")—such as providing greater control over the display of such things as cursors and the outlines that surround buttons or text fields in forms that denote a "focus" for user input—it also includes an extensive preview as to how you can affect the functionality of Web pages when now-draft CSS3 properties become available. Mastering the properties covered in these sections guarantees that you will be at the forefront of CSS-based Web design. Chapter 21 ("Aural Cascading Style Sheets") begins a section of the book covering either under-implemented CSS properties or those specific to working with a particular browser. This chapter explores a relatively new class of properties designed to enable the Web author to determine how a Web page could be spoken aloud by a browser with speech capabilities—sadly, this is poorly implemented in the major browsers. Chapter 22 ("Ruby") looks at the properties used in formatting a particular type of Chinese text layout; these properties are specific to Internet Explorer but are now being actively considered by the W3C for inclusion in the future CSS3 specification. Columnar layout properties, based in part on some old browser-specific HTML tags in Netscape Navigator, are explored in Chapter 23 ("Multi-Column Layout"). Chapter 24 ("Scrollbars") briefly looks at some properties designed to change the appearance of scrollbars specific to recent versions of Internet Explorer. The final chapter (Chapter 25 "Filters and Transitions") is a sizable one devoted to Internet Explorer's CSS-based way of adding some interesting and often dynamic visual effects. Appendix A is a CSS compatibility chart, looking at all of the "Safe," "Unsafe" and "Partial"-ly implemented CSS1 and CSS2 properties for various versions of the browsers Web authors are likely to run into. Appendix B provides an alphabetical listing of all CSS1, CSS2 and Internet Explorer CSS properties (minus the admittedly oddball filter and transition properties) as a quick reference. Appendix C looks at the CSS3 Mobile Profile and contains properties that are expected to be implemented in scaled-down browsers intended for use while "on the go."
Category: Computers