WOODLAND PERIOD SYSTEMATICS IN THE MIDDLE OHIO VALLEY

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Woodland Period Systematics In The Middle Ohio Valley

Author : Darlene Applegate
ISBN : 9780817352370
Genre : History
File Size : 87.19 MB
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This collection provides a comprehensive vocabulary for defining the cultural manifestation of the term “Woodland.” The Middle Ohio Valley is an archaeologically rich region that stretches from southeastern Indiana, across southern Ohio and northeastern Kentucky, and into northwestern West Virginia. In this area are some of the most spectacular and diverse Woodland Period archaeological sites in North America, but these sites and their rich cultural remains do not fit easily into the traditional Southeastern classification system. This volume, with contributions by most of the senior researchers in the field, represents an important step toward establishing terminology and taxa that are more appropriate to interpreting cultural diversity in the region. The important questions are diverse. What criteria are useful in defining periods and cultural types, and over what spatial and temporal boundaries do those criteria hold? How can we accommodate regional variation in the development and expression of traits used to delineate periods and cultural types? How does the concept of tradition relate to periods and cultural types? Is it prudent to equate culture types with periods? Is it prudent to equate archaeological cultures with ethnographic cultures? How does the available taxonomy hinder research? Contributing authors address these issues and others in the context of their Middle Ohio Valley Woodland Period research. Darlene Applegate is Associate Professor of Folk Studies and Anthropology at Western Kentucky University. Robert C. Mainfort Jr. is an archaeologist with the Arkansas Archeological Survey in Fayetteville, Professor of Anthropology at the University of Arkansas, and co-editor of The Woodland Southeast. With Contributions By: Darlene Applegate, David S. Brose, James A. Brown, Jarrod Burks, R. Berle Clay, William S. Dancey, N’omi B. Greber, R. Eric Hollinger, Jonathan P. Kerr, Robert C. Mainfort Jr , David Pollack, Sean M. Rafferty, Michael D. Richmond, Eric J. Schlarb, Mark F. Seeman, William E. Sharp, Lauren E. Sieg, Patrick D. Trade, Teresa
Category: History

Res

Author : Francesco Pellizzi
ISBN : 9780873658669
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 28.6 MB
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RES 65/66 includes Francesco Pellizzi, “Editorial: RES at 35”; Remo Bodei, “A constellation of words”; Mary Weismantel, “Encounters with dragons”; Z. S. Strother, “A terrifying mimesis”; Wyatt MacGaffey, “Franchising minkisi in Loango”; Karen Overbey, “Seeing through stone”; Noam Andrews, “The space of knowledge”; and other papers.
Category: Social Science

Pinson Mounds

Author : Jr. Mainfort
ISBN : 9781610755276
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 23.42 MB
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Pinson Mounds: Middle Woodland Ceremonialism in the Midsouth is a comprehensive overview and reinterpretation of the largest Middle Woodland mound complex in the Southeast. Located in west Tennessee about ten miles south of Jackson, the Pinson Mounds complex includes at least thirteen mounds, a geometric earthen embankment, and contemporary short-term occupation areas within an area of about four hundred acres. A unique feature of Pinson Mounds is the presence of five large, rectangular platform mounds from eight to seventy-two feet in height. Around A.D. 100, Pinson Mounds was a pilgrimage center that drew visitors from well beyond the local population and accommodated many distinct cultural groups and people of varied social stations. Stylistically nonlocal ceramics have been found in virtually every excavated locality, all together representing a large portion of the Southeast. Along with an overview of this important and unique mound complex, Pinson Mounds also provides a reassessment of roughly contemporary centers in the greater Midsouth and Lower Mississippi Valley and challenges past interpretations of the Hopewell phenomenon in the region.
Category: Social Science

Ohio

Author : Kevin F. Kern
ISBN : 9781118548325
Genre : History
File Size : 44.17 MB
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Ohio: A History of the Buckeye State explores the breadth of Ohio’s past, tracing the course of history from its earliest geological periods to the present day in an accessible, single-volume format. Features the most up-to-date research on Ohio, drawing on material in the disciplines of history, archaeology, and political science Includes thematic chapters focusing on major social, economic, and political trends Amply illustrated with maps, drawings, and photographs Receipient of the Ohio Geneological Society's Henry Howe Award in 2014
Category: History

Societies In Eclipse

Author : David S. Brose
ISBN : 9780817353520
Genre : History
File Size : 58.27 MB
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Archaeologists combine recent research with insights from anthropology, historiography, and oral tradition to examine the cultural landscape preceding and immediately following the arrival of Europeans.
Category: History

Ceramic Petrography And Hopewell Interaction

Author : James B. Stoltman
ISBN : 9780817318598
Genre : History
File Size : 50.75 MB
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Ceramic Petrography and Hopewell Interaction is a highly innovative study in which James B. Stoltman uses petrography to reveal previously undetectable evidence of cultural interaction among Hopewell societies of the Ohio Valley region and the contemporary peoples of the Southeast.
Category: History

The Ohio Hopewell Episode

Author : A. Martin Byers
ISBN : 1931968004
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 80.40 MB
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There is a general consensus among the North American archaeologists specializing in the Middle Woodland period (ca 100B.C. to ca A.D. 400) that the Ohio Hopewell was a rather straight forward complex of small-scaled peer polity communities based on simple gardening and extensive foraging practices and occupying dispersed habitation locales loosely clustered around major earthworks. This book challenges this general consensus by presenting a radically alternative view. It argues that the Ohio Hopewell episode can be better and more coherently characterized by treating it as a complex social system based on dual and mutually autonomous social networks of clan alliances and world renewal cults, and that this dual clan-cult social system was, in fact, the culmination of such social systems that were widely dispersed across the Eastern Woodlands. The cults were devoted to treating their deceased members and/or dependants as sacrificial offerings to enhance the sacred powers of nature and the clans were devoted to transforming their deceased into ancestors and the stresses these opposing mortuary practices generated underwrote the dynamics of the Ohio Hopewell and brought about the monumental earthworks as sacred locales of world renewal cults.
Category: Social Science

The Woodland Southeast

Author : David G. Anderson
ISBN : 9780817311377
Genre : History
File Size : 25.37 MB
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This collection presents, for the first time, a much-needed synthesis of the major research themes and findings that characterize the Woodland Period in the southeastern United States. The Woodland Period (ca. 1200 B.C. to A.D. 1000) has been the subject of a great deal of archaeological research over the past 25 years. Researchers have learned that in this approximately 2000-year era the peoples of the Southeast experienced increasing sedentism, population growth, and organizational complexity. At the beginning of the period, people are assumed to have been living in small groups, loosely bound by collective burial rituals. But by the first millennium A.D., some parts of the region had densely packed civic ceremonial centers ruled by hereditary elites. Maize was now the primary food crop. Perhaps most importantly, the ancient animal-focused and hunting-based religion and cosmology were being replaced by solar and warfare iconography, consistent with societies dependent on agriculture, and whose elites were increasingly in competition with one another. This volume synthesizes the research on what happened during this era and how these changes came about while analyzing the period's archaeological record. In gathering the latest research available on the Woodland Period, the editors have included contributions from the full range of specialists working in the field, highlighted major themes, and directed readers to the proper primary sources. Of interest to archaeologists and anthropologists, both professional and amateur, this will be a valuable reference work essential to understanding the Woodland Period in the Southeast.
Category: History