UNEQUAL CHILDHOODS CLASS RACE AND FAMILY LIFE 2ND EDITION WITH AN UPDATE A DECADE LATER

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Unequal Childhoods

Author : Annette Lareau
ISBN : 9780520271425
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 51.27 MB
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This book is a powerful portrayal of class inequalities in the United States. It contains insightful analysis of the processes through which inequality is reproduced, and it frankly engages with methodological and analytic dilemmas usually glossed over in academic texts.
Category: Social Science

Unequal Childhoods

Author : Annette Lareau
ISBN : 9780520949904
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 55.57 MB
Format : PDF
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Class does make a difference in the lives and futures of American children. Drawing on in-depth observations of black and white middle-class, working-class, and poor families, Unequal Childhoods explores this fact, offering a picture of childhood today. Here are the frenetic families managing their children's hectic schedules of "leisure" activities; and here are families with plenty of time but little economic security. Lareau shows how middle-class parents, whether black or white, engage in a process of "concerted cultivation" designed to draw out children's talents and skills, while working-class and poor families rely on "the accomplishment of natural growth," in which a child's development unfolds spontaneously—as long as basic comfort, food, and shelter are provided. Each of these approaches to childrearing brings its own benefits and its own drawbacks. In identifying and analyzing differences between the two, Lareau demonstrates the power, and limits, of social class in shaping the lives of America's children. The first edition of Unequal Childhoods was an instant classic, portraying in riveting detail the unexpected ways in which social class influences parenting in white and African American families. A decade later, Annette Lareau has revisited the same families and interviewed the original subjects to examine the impact of social class in the transition to adulthood.
Category: Social Science

Unequal Childhoods

Author : Annette Lareau
ISBN : 0520930479
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 83.99 MB
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Class does make a difference in the lives and futures of American children. Drawing on in-depth observations of black and white middle-class, working-class, and poor families, Unequal Childhoods explores this fact, offering a picture of childhood today. Here are the frenetic families managing their children's hectic schedules of "leisure" activities; and here are families with plenty of time but little economic security. Lareau shows how middle-class parents, whether black or white, engage in a process of "concerted cultivation" designed to draw out children's talents and skills, while working-class and poor families rely on "the accomplishment of natural growth," in which a child's development unfolds spontaneously—as long as basic comfort, food, and shelter are provided. Each of these approaches to childrearing brings its own benefits and its own drawbacks. In identifying and analyzing differences between the two, Lareau demonstrates the power, and limits, of social class in shaping the lives of America's children. The first edition of Unequal Childhoods was an instant classic, portraying in riveting detail the unexpected ways in which social class influences parenting in white and African-American families. A decade later, Annette Lareau has revisited the same families and interviewed the original subjects to examine the impact of social class in the transition to adulthood.
Category: Social Science

The Most Beautiful Girl In The World

Author : Sarah Banet-Weiser
ISBN : 0520217896
Genre : Performing Arts
File Size : 50.76 MB
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This is an intriguing and original examination of how issues of sex, race and nationalism get played out in US beauty pageants, and how pageants have tried to respond to large social and political change. She takes issue with those in Naomi Wolff's camp, as well as with conservatives.
Category: Performing Arts

Siting Translation

Author : Tejaswini Niranjana
ISBN : 9780520074514
Genre : Foreign Language Study
File Size : 26.83 MB
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"Niranjana brings into colloquy key texts from a classic age of translation and new post-humanistic texts on the same issues. She shows how the questions of translation must be reframed in light of the critique of emerging work on imperialism and cultural studies. This is a key work for translation studies."—Frances Bartkowski, author of Feminist Utopias
Category: Foreign Language Study

Social Class

Author : Annette Lareau
ISBN : 9781610447256
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 71.27 MB
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Class differences permeate the neighborhoods, classrooms, and workplaces where we lead our daily lives. But little is known about how class really works, and its importance is often downplayed or denied. In this important new volume, leading sociologists systematically examine how social class operates in the United States today. Social Class argues against the view that we are becoming a classless society. The authors show instead the decisive ways social class matters—from how long people live, to how they raise their children, to how they vote. The distinguished contributors to Social Class examine how class works in a variety of domains including politics, health, education, gender, and the family. Michael Hout shows that class membership remains an integral part of identity in the U.S.—in two large national surveys, over 97 percent of Americans, when prompted, identify themselves with a particular class. Dalton Conley identifies an intangible but crucial source of class difference that he calls the “opportunity horizon”—children form aspirations based on what they have seen is possible. The best predictor of earning a college degree isn’t race, income, or even parental occupation—it is, rather, the level of education that one’s parents achieved. Annette Lareau and Elliot Weininger find that parental involvement in the college application process, which significantly contributes to student success, is overwhelmingly a middle-class phenomenon. David Grusky and Kim Weeden introduce a new model for measuring inequality that allows researchers to assess not just the extent of inequality, but also whether it is taking on a more polarized, class-based form. John Goldthorpe and Michelle Jackson examine the academic careers of students in three social classes and find that poorly performing students from high-status families do much better in many instances than talented students from less-advantaged families. Erik Olin Wright critically assesses the emphasis on individual life chances in many studies of class and calls for a more structural conception of class. In an epilogue, journalists Ray Suarez, Janny Scott, and Roger Hodge reflect on the media’s failure to report hardening class lines in the United States, even when images on the nightly news—such as those involving health, crime, or immigration—are profoundly shaped by issues of class. Until now, class scholarship has been highly specialized, with researchers working on only one part of a larger puzzle. Social Class gathers the most current research in one volume, and persuasively illustrates that class remains a powerful force in American society.
Category: Social Science

Learning To Labor

Author : Paul E. Willis
ISBN : 0231053576
Genre : Family & Relationships
File Size : 42.39 MB
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Hailed by the New Society as the "best book on male working class youth," this classic work, first published in 1977, has been translated into several foreign languages and remains the authority in ethnographical studies.
Category: Family & Relationships

Divided By Borders

Author : Joanna Dreby
ISBN : 9780520266605
Genre : Family & Relationships
File Size : 77.30 MB
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"Just a phone call away, but what anguish! As employers of migrants who care for our children, clean our houses, work in fast food restaurants--or on the shop floor--we are so often blind to the sacrifices made by parents who see no other choice but to leave their children back home in Mexico and come to the U.S. for work. With passion and insight, Divided by Borders explores the agony that unfolds between husbands and wives, across generation, and the consequences on children left behind and those who cross the border."--Carol B. Stack, author of All Our Kin and Call To Home "In this compelling, intimate, and heartbreaking look into the lives of Mexican migrants who leave children, Dreby brings an impressive blend of ethnography, interviews, and surveys with parents, children, and caregivers--collected over four years on both sides of the border--to bear. This is a story of migration where parental sacrifice is monumental, yet dreams for intergenerational mobility are ultimately dashed. The work is rich with both sociological insight and policy importance. This is the rare academic work that readers will find hard to put down."--Kathy Edin, author of Promises I Can Keep: Why Poor Women Choose Motherhood Before Marriage "Joanna Dreby's excellent book illuminates dimensions of migration and transnational life that have remained too often in the dark. Her focus on what happens inside the 'black box' of the migrant family shows how migrants and their children live their lives in difficult circumstances. She deepens our understanding of many important issues, and does so via intimate, ethnographic research. For example, her work sheds light on the gendered practices and ideologies surrounding parental leave taking, and sheds light on the incompatibility of migrant time and developmental time. Her work on the power children wield in the intra-family negotiations on whether and when to reunite, and the long term human cost of migration, is pathbreaking. Watching Joanna Dreby's work develop into this book over the years has been a great joy, and reading it is even more so."--Robert Courtney Smith, Professor of Sociology, Immigration Studies and Public Affairs, Baruch College School of Public Affairs, and Sociology Department, Graduate Center, CUNY "Family separation brought about by labor migration is not new, but hostile immigration policies have made for prolonged separations for parents and children. How do families cope? In this gripping and acutely observed study of Mexican migrant families, Joanna Dreby reveals the multi-faceted challenges facing the parents, their children and teens (who often harbor resentment against parents), and the grandmothers who serve as caregivers 'back home.' This engagingly written book is ideal for classroom adoption, and it will become a classic contribution to the scholarship on families and contemporary immigration."--Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo, author of God's Heart Has No Borders
Category: Family & Relationships

Social Things

Author : Charles Lemert
ISBN : 9781442211629
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 31.69 MB
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Social Things introduces the sociological imagination through lively, memorable stories and interpretations. This fifth edition celebrates the book's fifteenth anniversary with important updates, an entirely new chapter that addresses the environmental challenges in our global world and many additions that bring the history of sociology up-to-date.
Category: Social Science

Opting Out

Author : Pamela Stone
ISBN : 0520941799
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 30.49 MB
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Noting a phenomenon that might seem to recall a previous era, The New York Times Magazine recently portrayed women who leave their careers in order to become full-time mothers as "opting out." But, are high-achieving professional women really choosing to abandon their careers in order to return home? This provocative study is the first to tackle this issue from the perspective of the women themselves. Based on a series of candid, in-depth interviews with women who returned home after working as doctors, lawyers, bankers, scientists, and other professions, Pamela Stone explores the role that their husbands, children, and coworkers play in their decision; how women’s efforts to construct new lives and new identities unfold once they are home; and where their aspirations and plans for the future lie. What we learn—contrary to many media perceptions—is that these high-flying women are not opting out but are instead being pushed out of the workplace. Drawing on their experiences, Stone outlines concrete ideas for redesigning workplaces to make it easier for women—and men—to attain their goal of living rewarding lives that combine both families and careers.
Category: Social Science