THEY THOUGHT THEY WERE FREE THE GERMANS 1933 45

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They Thought They Were Free

Author : Milton Mayer
ISBN : 9780226525976
Genre : History
File Size : 42.64 MB
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“When this book was first published it received some attention from the critics but none at all from the public. Nazism was finished in the bunker in Berlin and its death warrant signed on the bench at Nuremberg.” That’s Milton Mayer, writing in a foreword to the 1966 edition of They Thought They Were Free. He’s right about the critics: the book was a finalist for the National Book Award in 1956. General readers may have been slower to take notice, but over time they did—what we’ve seen over decades is that any time people, across the political spectrum, start to feel that freedom is threatened, the book experiences a ripple of word-of-mouth interest. And that interest has never been more prominent or potent than what we’ve seen in the past year. They Thought They Were Free is an eloquent and provocative examination of the development of fascism in Germany. Mayer’s book is a study of ten Germans and their lives from 1933-45, based on interviews he conducted after the war when he lived in Germany. Mayer had a position as a research professor at the University of Frankfurt and lived in a nearby small Hessian town which he disguised with the name “Kronenberg.” “These ten men were not men of distinction,” Mayer noted, but they had been members of the Nazi Party; Mayer wanted to discover what had made them Nazis. His discussions with them of Nazism, the rise of the Reich, and mass complicity with evil became the backbone of this book, an indictment of the ordinary German that is all the more powerful for its refusal to let the rest of us pretend that our moment, our society, our country are fundamentally immune. A new foreword to this edition by eminent historian of the Reich Richard J. Evans puts the book in historical and contemporary context. We live in an age of fervid politics and hyperbolic rhetoric. They Thought They Were Free cuts through that, revealing instead the slow, quiet accretions of change, complicity, and abdication of moral authority that quietly mark the rise of evil.
Category: History

They Thought They Were Free

Author : Milton Mayer
ISBN : 9780226525839
Genre : History
File Size : 69.79 MB
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Interviews with ten former Nazis comprise the core of this penetrating study of the psychological causes of Nazism and their implications for modern Germany.
Category: History

They Thought They Were Free

Author : Milton Mayer
ISBN : 9780226924731
Genre : History
File Size : 31.87 MB
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First published in 1955, They Thought They Were Free is an eloquent and provocative examination of the development of fascism in Germany. Mayer’s book is a study of ten Germans and their lives from 1933-45, based on interviews he conducted after the war when he lived in Germany. Mayer had a position as a research professor at the University of Frankfurt and lived in a nearby small Hessian town which he disguised with the name “Kronenberg.” “These ten men were not men of distinction,” Mayer noted, but they had been members of the Nazi Party; Mayer wanted to discover what had made them Nazis. “What happened here was the gradual habituation of the people, little by little, to being governed by surprise; to receiving decisions deliberated in secret; to believing that the situation was so complicated that the government had to act on information which the people could not understand, or so dangerous that, even if the people could not understand it, it could not be released because of national security. And their sense of identification with Hitler, their trust in him, made it easier to widen this gap and reassured those who would otherwise have worried about it.”--from Chapter 13, “But Then It Was Too Late”
Category: History

Popular Opinion And Political Dissent In The Third Reich Bavaria 1933 1945

Author : Ian Kershaw
ISBN : 0199251118
Genre : History
File Size : 51.82 MB
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Now updated with a new introduction and bibliography Ian Kershaw's classic study of popular responses to Nazi policy and ideology explores the political mentality of 'ordinary Germans' in one part of Hitler's Reich. Basing his account on many unpublished sources, the author analyses socio-economic discontent and the popular reaction to the anti-Church and anti-Jewish policies of the Nazis, and reveals the bitter divisions and dissent of everyday reality in the Third Reich, in stark contrast to the propaganda image of a 'National Community' united behind its leaders. The focus on one particular region makes possible a depth of analysis that takes full account of local and social variations, and avoids easy generalization; but the findings of this study of ordinary behaviour in a police state have implications extending far beyond the confines of Bavaria or indeed Germany in this period.
Category: History

Hitler My Neighbor

Author : Edgar Feuchtwanger
ISBN : 9781590518649
Genre : BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY
File Size : 29.66 MB
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Edgar Feuchtwanger came from a prominent German-Jewish family. He was a carefree five-year-old when Adolf Hitler moved into the building opposite. In 1933 the joy of this untroubled life was shattered. Hitler had been named Chancellor. Edgar's parents, stripped of their rights as citizens, tried to protect him from increasingly degrading realities. In class, his teacher had him draw swastikas, and his schoolmates joined the Hitler Youth. In 1939 Edgar was sent alone to England. It wasn't until the age of 88 he felt ready to tell the story of his buried childhood and his infamous neighbour.
Category: BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY

Sideswiped

Author : Robert W. Ney
ISBN : 9780988247642
Genre : Self-Help
File Size : 22.99 MB
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Ohio Congressman Bob Ney plead guilty to federal charges of corruption and falsification of federal documents in connection with Jack Abramoff, a Washington super lobbyist-turned criminal. As a six-term member of congress, Bob found himself caught up in a culture of greed, backstabbing, and corruption that eventually destroyed his career. In his new book, Bob recounts the events leading up to his resignation, his own guilt, and how a powerful member of congress and the Bush Administration officials played leading roles in both the Abramoff scandal and Bob's own downfall.
Category: Self-Help

Broken Lives

Author : Konrad H. Jarausch
ISBN : 9781400889334
Genre : History
File Size : 37.22 MB
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The gripping stories of ordinary Germans who lived through World War II, the Holocaust, and Cold War partition—but also recovery, reunification, and rehabilitation Broken Lives is a gripping account of the twentieth century as seen through the eyes of ordinary Germans who came of age under Hitler and whose lives were scarred and sometimes destroyed by what they saw and did. Drawing on six dozen memoirs by the generation of Germans born in the 1920s, Konrad Jarausch chronicles the unforgettable stories of people who not only lived through the Third Reich, World War II, the Holocaust, and Cold War partition, but also participated in Germany's astonishing postwar recovery, reunification, and rehabilitation. Written decades after the events, these testimonies, many of them unpublished, look back on the mistakes of young people caught up in the Nazi movement. In many, early enthusiasm turns to deep disillusionment as the price of complicity with a brutal dictatorship--fighting at the front, aerial bombardment at home, murder in the concentration camps—becomes clear. Bringing together the voices of men and women, perpetrators and victims, Broken Lives reveals the intimate human details of historical events and offers new insights about persistent questions. Why did so many Germans support Hitler through years of wartime sacrifice and Nazi inhumanity? How did they finally distance themselves from this racist dictatorship and come to embrace human rights? Jarausch argues that this generation's focus on its own suffering, often maligned by historians, ultimately led to a more critical understanding of national identity—one that helped transform Germany from a military aggressor into a pillar of European democracy. The result is a powerful account of the everyday experiences and troubling memories of average Germans who journeyed into, through, and out of the abyss of a dark century.
Category: History

Germans Into Nazis

Author : Peter Fritzsche
ISBN : 0674350928
Genre : History
File Size : 54.82 MB
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Examines the rise of National Socialism in Germany
Category: History

Hitler S Geographies

Author : Paolo Giaccaria
ISBN : 9780226274423
Genre : History
File Size : 70.67 MB
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17. What Remains? Sites of Deportation in Contemporary European Daily Life: The Case of Drancy / Katherine Fleming -- Acknowledgments -- Contributor Biographies -- Index
Category: History

In The House Of The Hangman

Author : Jeffrey K. Olick
ISBN : 0226626385
Genre : History
File Size : 42.82 MB
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Examines the processes and struggles of establishing a German postwar identity and history that incoporates the period of National Socialism.
Category: History