THE STRIPPING OF THE ALTARS

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The Stripping Of The Altars

Author : Eamon Duffy
ISBN : 0300108281
Genre : Religion
File Size : 46.56 MB
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Recreating lay people's experience of the religion of the pre-Reformation church, this text argues that late-medieval Catholicism was neither decadent nor decayed, but was a strong & vigorous tradition, & that the Reformation represented a violent rupture from a popular & thoroughly respectable religious system. Previous ed.: 1992.
Category: Religion

The Stripping Of The Altars

Author : Eamon Duffy
ISBN : 9780300197761
Genre : Religion
File Size : 84.17 MB
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This prize-winning account of the pre-Reformation church recreates lay people’s experience of religion in fifteenth-century England. Eamon Duffy shows that late medieval Catholicism was neither decadent nor decayed, but was a strong and vigorous tradition, and that the Reformation represented a violent rupture from a popular and theologically respectable religious system. For this edition, Duffy has written a new Preface reflecting on recent developments in our understanding of the period. From reviews of the first edition: “A magnificent scholarly achievement [and] a compelling read.”—Patricia Morrison, Financial Times “Deeply imaginative, movingly written, and splendidly illustrated. . . . Duffy’s analysis . . . carries conviction.”—Maurice Keen, New York Review of Books “This book will afford enjoyment and enlightenment to layman and specialist alike.”—Peter Heath, Times Literary Supplement “[An] astonishing and magnificent piece of work.”—Edward T. Oakes, Commonweal
Category: Religion

The Voices Of Morebath

Author : Eamon Duffy
ISBN : 9780300175028
Genre : History
File Size : 65.87 MB
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In the fifty years between 1530 and 1580, England moved from being one of the most lavishly Catholic countries in Europe to being a Protestant nation, a land of whitewashed churches and antipapal preaching. What was the impact of this religious change in the countryside? And how did country people feel about the revolutionary upheavals that transformed their mental and material worlds under Henry VIII and his three children? In this book a reformation historian takes us inside the mind and heart of Morebath, a remote and tiny sheep farming village on the southern edge of Exmoor. The bulk of Morebath’s conventional archives have long since vanished. But from 1520 to 1574, through nearly all the drama of the English Reformation, Morebath’s only priest, Sir Christopher Trychay, kept the parish accounts on behalf of the churchwardens. Opinionated, eccentric, and talkative, Sir Christopher filled these vivid scripts for parish meetings with the names and doings of his parishioners. Through his eyes we catch a rare glimpse of the life and pre-Reformation piety of a sixteenth-century English village. The book also offers a unique window into a rural world in crisis as the Reformation progressed. Sir Christopher Trychay’s accounts provide direct evidence of the motives which drove the hitherto law-abiding West-Country communities to participate in the doomed Prayer-Book Rebellion of 1549 culminating in the siege of Exeter that ended in bloody defeat and a wave of executions. Its church bells confiscated and silenced, Morebath shared in the punishment imposed on all the towns and villages of Devon and Cornwall. Sir Christopher documents the changes in the community, reluctantly Protestant and increasingly preoccupied with the secular demands of the Elizabethan state, the equipping of armies, and the payment of taxes. Morebath’s priest, garrulous to the end of his days, describes a rural world irrevocably altered and enables us to hear the voices of his villagers after four hundred years of silence.
Category: History

Reformation Divided

Author : Eamon Duffy
ISBN : 9781472934345
Genre : Religion
File Size : 69.54 MB
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Published to mark the 500th anniversary of the events of 1517, Reformation Divided explores the impact in England of the cataclysmic transformations of European Christianity in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The religious revolution initiated by Martin Luther is usually referred to as 'The Reformation', a tendentious description implying that the shattering of the medieval religious foundations of Europe was a single process, in which a defective form of Christianity was replaced by one that was unequivocally benign, 'the midwife of the modern world'. The book challenges these assumptions by tracing the ways in which the project of reforming Christendom from within, initiated by Christian 'humanists' like Erasmus and Thomas More, broke apart into conflicting and often murderous energies and ideologies, dividing not only Catholic from Protestant, but creating deep internal rifts within all the churches which emerged from Europe's religious conflicts. The book is in three parts: In 'Thomas More and Heresy', Duffy examines how and why England's greatest humanist apparently abandoned the tolerant humanism of his youthful masterpiece Utopia, and became the bitterest opponent of the early Protestant movement. 'Counter-Reformation England' explores the ways in which post-Reformation English Catholics accommodated themselves to a complex new identity as persecuted religious dissidents within their own country, but in a European context, active participants in the global renewal of the Catholic Church. The book's final section 'The Godly and the Conversion of England' considers the ideals and difficulties of radical reformers attempting to transform the conventional Protestantism of post-Reformation England into something more ardent and committed. In addressing these subjects, Duffy shines new light on the fratricidal ideological conflicts which lasted for more than a century, and whose legacy continues to shape the modern world.
Category: Religion

Saints Sacrilege And Sedition

Author : Eamon Duffy
ISBN : 9781472909176
Genre : England
File Size : 51.43 MB
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Eamon Duffy publishes a book on the broad sweep of English Reformation history, including a study of Late Medieval religion and society.
Category: England

Marking The Hours

Author : Eamon Duffy
ISBN : 0300117140
Genre : History
File Size : 88.15 MB
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Discussing the book of hours, this work examines surviving copies of the personal prayer books, which were used for private, domestic devotions, and in which people commonly left traces of their lives. It teases out clues to the private thoughts and public contexts of their owners.
Category: History

The Late Medieval English Church

Author : G.W. Bernard
ISBN : 9780300182583
Genre : History
File Size : 76.61 MB
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The later medieval English church is invariably viewed through the lens of the Reformation that transformed it. But in this bold and provocative book historian George Bernard examines it on its own terms, revealing a church with vibrant faith and great energy, but also with weaknesses which reforming bishops worked to overcome. Bernard emphasises royal control over the church. He examines the challenges facing bishops and clergy, and assesses the depth of lay knowledge and understanding of the teachings of the church, highlighting the practice of pilgrimage. He reconsiders anti-clerical sentiment and the extent and significance of heresy. He shows that the Reformation was not inevitable: the late medieval church was much too full of vitality. But Bernard also argues that alongside that vitality, and often closely linked to it, were vulnerabilities that made the break with Rome and the dissolution of the monasteries possible. The result is a thought-provoking study of a church and society in transformation.
Category: History

Altars Restored

Author : Kenneth Fincham
ISBN : 9780198207009
Genre : History
File Size : 49.16 MB
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By looking at what happened physically in the local churches, in contrast to the formal enactments of government, and using sources such as churchwardens' accounts and surviving religious artefacts, the book recaptures the experience of the ordinary parishioner in this crucial period of religious change.
Category: History

English Reformations

Author : Christopher Haigh
ISBN : 9780198221623
Genre : History
File Size : 36.86 MB
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English Reformations takes a refreshing new approach to the study of the Reformation in England. Christopher Haigh's lively and readable study disproves any facile assumption that the triumph of Protestantism was inevitable, and goes beyond the surface of official political policy to explore the religious views and practices of ordinary English people. With the benefit of hindsight, other historians have traced the course of the Reformation as a series of events inescapably culminating in the creation of the English Protestant establishment. Haigh sets out to recreate the sixteenth century as a time of excitement and insecurity, with each new policy or ruler causing the reversal of earlier religious changes. This is a scholarly and stimulating book, which challenges traditional ideas about the Reformation and offers a powerful and convincing alternative analysis.
Category: History