THE SOCIAL TRANSFORMATION OF AMERICAN MEDICINE THE RISE OF A SOVEREIGN PROFESSION AND THE MAKING OF A VAST INDUSTRY

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The Social Transformation Of American Medicine

Author : Paul Starr
ISBN : 9780786725458
Genre : Medical
File Size : 63.89 MB
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Winner of the 1983 Pulitzer Prize and the Bancroft Prize in American History, this is a landmark history of how the entire American health care system of doctors, hospitals, health plans, and government programs has evolved over the last two centuries. "The definitive social history of the medical profession in America....A monumental achievement."—H. Jack Geiger, M.D., New York Times Book Review
Category: Medical

The Social Transformation Of American Medicine

Author : Paul Starr
ISBN : 0465079350
Genre : Medical
File Size : 25.87 MB
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Examines the rise of the doctor's control over the health-care system and discusses the threat of new health-care conglomerates to the practitioners' dominance of the system
Category: Medical

The Social Transformation Of American Medicine

Author : Paul Starr
ISBN : 9780786725458
Genre : Medical
File Size : 65.99 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 144
Read : 805

Winner of the 1983 Pulitzer Prize and the Bancroft Prize in American History, this is a landmark history of how the entire American health care system of doctors, hospitals, health plans, and government programs has evolved over the last two centuries. "The definitive social history of the medical profession in America....A monumental achievement."—H. Jack Geiger, M.D., New York Times Book Review
Category: Medical

Reader S Guide To American History

Author : Peter J. Parish
ISBN : 1884964222
Genre : History
File Size : 60.72 MB
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There are so many books on so many aspects of the history of the United States, offering such a wide variety of interpretations, that students, teachers, scholars, and librarians often need help and advice on how to find what they want. The Reader's Guide to American History is designed to meet that need by adopting a new and constructive approach to the appreciation of this rich historiography. Each of the 600 entries on topics in political, social and economic history describes and evaluates some 6 to 12 books on the topic, providing guidance to the reader on everything from broad surveys and interpretive works to specialized monographs. The entries are devoted to events and individuals, as well as broader themes, and are written by a team of well over 200 contributors, all scholars of American history.
Category: History

A Reader In Health Policy And Management

Author : Mahon, Ann
ISBN : 9780335233687
Genre : Medical
File Size : 48.87 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
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This reader offers instant access to fifty classic and original readings in health policy and management. Compiled by experts, the editors introduce a framework setting out the key policy drivers and policy levers, giving a conceptual framework that provides context for each piece.
Category: Medical

Remedy And Reaction

Author : Paul Starr
ISBN : 9780300206661
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 34.49 MB
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In no other country has health care served as such a volatile flashpoint of ideological conflict. America has endured a century of rancorous debate on health insurance, and despite the passage of legislation in 2010, the battle is not yet over. This book is a history of how and why the United States became so stubbornly different in health care, presented by an expert with unsurpassed knowledge of the issues. Tracing health-care reform from its beginnings to its current uncertain prospects, Paul Starr argues that the United States ensnared itself in a trap through policies that satisfied enough of the public and so enriched the health-care industry as to make the system difficult to change. He reveals the inside story of the rise and fall of the Clinton health plan in the early 1990sùand of the Gingrich counterrevolution that followed. And he explains the curious tale of how Mitt RomneyÆs reforms in Massachusetts became a model for Democrats and then follows both the passage of those reforms under Obama and the explosive reaction they elicited from conservatives. Writing concisely and with an even hand, the author offers exactly what is needed as the debate continuesùa penetrating account of how health care became such treacherous terrain in American politics.
Category: Political Science

Poor People S Medicine

Author : Jonathan Engel
ISBN : 0822336952
Genre : History
File Size : 45.41 MB
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DIVA national and state-by-state history of public health options for the American poor./div
Category: History

In The Shadow Of Medicine

Author : Arnold Birenbaum
ISBN : 0930390288
Genre : Medical
File Size : 86.80 MB
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To find more information about Rowman and Littlefield titles, please visit www.rowmanlittlefield.com.
Category: Medical

Bittersweet

Author : Chris Feudtner
ISBN : 9780807863183
Genre : Health & Fitness
File Size : 76.45 MB
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One of medicine's most remarkable therapeutic triumphs was the discovery of insulin in 1921. The drug produced astonishing results, rescuing children and adults from the deadly grip of diabetes. But as Chris Feudtner demonstrates, the subsequent transformation of the disease from a fatal condition into a chronic illness is a story of success tinged with irony, a revealing saga that illuminates the complex human consequences of medical intervention. Bittersweet chronicles this history of diabetes through the compelling perspectives of people who lived with this disease. Drawing on a remarkable body of letters exchanged between patients or their parents and Dr. Elliot P. Joslin and the staff of physicians at his famed Boston clinic, Feudtner examines the experience of living with diabetes across the twentieth century, highlighting changes in treatment and their profound effects on patients' lives. Although focused on juvenile-onset, or Type 1, diabetes, the themes explored in Bittersweet have implications for our understanding of adult-onset, or Type 2, diabetes, as well as a host of other diseases that, thanks to drugs or medical advances, are being transformed from acute to chronic conditions. Indeed, the tale of diabetes in the post-insulin era provides an ideal opportunity for exploring the larger questions of how medicine changes our lives.
Category: Health & Fitness

Mary Putnam Jacobi And The Politics Of Medicine In Nineteenth Century America

Author : Carla Bittel
ISBN : 9781469606446
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 77.83 MB
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In the late nineteenth century, as Americans debated the "woman question," a battle over the meaning of biology arose in the medical profession. Some medical men claimed that women were naturally weak, that education would make them physically ill, and that women physicians endangered the profession. Mary Putnam Jacobi (1842-1906), a physician from New York, worked to prove them wrong and argued that social restrictions, not biology, threatened female health. Mary Putnam Jacobi and the Politics of Medicine in Nineteenth-Century America is the first full-length biography of Mary Putnam Jacobi, the most significant woman physician of her era and an outspoken advocate for women's rights. Jacobi rose to national prominence in the 1870s and went on to practice medicine, teach, and conduct research for over three decades. She campaigned for co-education, professional opportunities, labor reform, and suffrage--the most important women's rights issues of her day. Downplaying gender differences, she used the laboratory to prove that women were biologically capable of working, learning, and voting. Science, she believed, held the key to promoting and producing gender equality. Carla Bittel's biography of Jacobi offers a piercing view of the role of science in nineteenth-century women's rights movements and provides historical perspective on continuing debates about gender and science today.
Category: Biography & Autobiography