The Protest Psychosis

Author : Jonathan M. Metzl
ISBN : 9780807085936
Genre : Psychology
File Size : 37.54 MB
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A powerful account of how cultural anxieties about race shaped American notions of mental illness The civil rights era is largely remembered as a time of sit-ins, boycotts, and riots. But a very different civil rights history evolved at the Ionia State Hospital for the Criminally Insane in Ionia, Michigan. In The Protest Psychosis, psychiatrist and cultural critic Jonathan Metzl tells the shocking story of how schizophrenia became the diagnostic term overwhelmingly applied to African American protesters at Ionia—for political reasons as well as clinical ones. Expertly sifting through a vast array of cultural documents, Metzl shows how associations between schizophrenia and blackness emerged during the tumultuous decades of the 1960s and 1970s—and he provides a cautionary tale of how anxieties about race continue to impact doctor-patient interactions in our seemingly postracial America. From the Trade Paperback edition.
Category: Psychology

The Protest Psychosis

Author : Jonathan Metzl
ISBN : 9780807001271
Genre : Psychology
File Size : 35.42 MB
Format : PDF
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The Protest Psychosis provides a cautionary tale of how anxieties about race continue to impact doctor-patient interactions, even during our current, seemingly post-race era of genetics, pharmacokinetics, and brain scans.
Category: Psychology

The Protest Psychosis

Author : Jonathan Metzl
ISBN : 2009016610
Genre : African Americans
File Size : 33.94 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
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Category: African Americans

Against Health

Author : Jonathan M. Metzl
ISBN : 0814761100
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 51.27 MB
Format : PDF
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You see someone smoking a cigarette and say,“Smoking is bad for your health,” when what you mean is, “You are a bad person because you smoke.” You encounter someone whose body size you deem excessive, and say, “Obesity is bad for your health,” when what you mean is, “You are lazy, unsightly, or weak of will.” You see a woman bottle-feeding an infant and say,“Breastfeeding is better for that child’s health,” when what you mean is that the woman must be a bad parent. You see the smokers, the overeaters, the bottle-feeders, and affirm your own health in the process. In these and countless other instances, the perception of your own health depends in part on your value judgments about others, and appealing to health allows for a set of moral assumptions to fly stealthily under the radar. Against Health argues that health is a concept, a norm, and a set of bodily practices whose ideological work is often rendered invisible by the assumption that it is a monolithic, universal good. And, that disparities in the incidence and prevalence of disease are closely linked to disparities in income and social support. To be clear, the book's stand against health is not a stand against the authenticity of people's attempts to ward off suffering. Against Health instead claims that individual strivings for health are, in some instances, rendered more difficult by the ways in which health is culturally configured and socially sustained. The book intervenes into current political debates about health in two ways. First, Against Health compellingly unpacks the divergent cultural meanings of health and explores the ideologies involved in its construction. Second, the authors present strategies for moving forward. They ask, what new possibilities and alliances arise? What new forms of activism or coalition can we create? What are our prospects for well-being? In short, what have we got if we ain't got health? Against Health ultimately argues that the conversations doctors, patients, politicians, activists, consumers, and policymakers have about health are enriched by recognizing that, when talking about health, they are not all talking about the same thing. And, that articulating the disparate valences of “health” can lead to deeper, more productive, and indeed more healthy interactions about our bodies.
Category: Social Science

Freud

Author : Jonathan Lear
ISBN : 9781317676812
Genre : Philosophy
File Size : 63.15 MB
Format : PDF
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In this fully updated second edition, Jonathan Lear clearly introduces and assesses all of Freud's thought, focusing on those areas of philosophy on which Freud is acknowledged to have had a lasting impact. These include the philosophy of mind, free will and determinism, rationality, the nature of the self and subjectivity, and ethics and religion. He also considers some of the deeper issues and problems Freud engaged with, brilliantly illustrating their philosophical significance: human sexuality, the unconscious, dreams, and the theory of transference. Lear’s approach emphasizes the philosophical significance of Freud’s fundamental rule – to say whatever comes to mind without censorship or inhibition. This binds psychoanalysis to the philosophical exploration of self-consciousness and truthfulness, as well as opening new paths of inquiry for moral psychology and ethics. The second edition includes a new Introduction and Conclusion. The text is revised throughout, including new sections on psychological structure and object relations and on Freud’s critique of religion and morality. One of the most important introductions and contributions to understanding this great thinker to have been published for many years, Freud, second edition will be essential reading for anyone in the humanities, social sciences and beyond with an interest in Freud or philosophy.
Category: Philosophy

Mad Travelers

Author : Ian Hacking
ISBN : 0674009541
Genre : Philosophy
File Size : 48.38 MB
Format : PDF
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Albert Dadas suffered from a strange compulsion that led him to travel obsessively, often without identification, not knowing who he was or why he traveled. Medical reports of Dadas set off at the time a small epidemic of compulsive mad voyagers, the epicenter of which was Bordeaux but which soon spread throughout France to Italy, Germany, and Russia. Today we are besieged by mental illnesses of the moment, such as chronic fatigue syndrome and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The debate rages about which of these conditions are affectations or cultural artifacts and which are "real." In Mad Travelers, Ian Hacking uses the Dadas case to weigh the legitimacy of cultural influences versus physical symptoms in the diagnosis of psychiatric disorders. He argues that psychological symptoms find stable homes at a given place and time, in "ecological niches" where transient illnesses flourish.
Category: Philosophy

American Madness

Author : Richard Noll
ISBN : 9780674062658
Genre : Medical
File Size : 79.26 MB
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In 1895 not a single case of dementia praecox was reported in the United States. By 1912 tens of thousands of people with this diagnosis were locked up in asylums, hospitals, and jails. By 1927 it was fading away. This book explains how such a terrible disease could be discovered, affect so many lives, and then turn out to be something else.
Category: Medical

Collaborative Competency Based Counseling And Therapy

Author : Bob Bertolino
ISBN : UOM:39015051283938
Genre : Psychology
File Size : 61.97 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This is the first book to fully explore a collaborative, competency-based orientation to counseling and psychotherapy. Based on 40 years of outcome research examining what works in therapy, mental health professionals are introduced to numerous ways of collaborating with clients from assessment through intervention and termination. Throughout the book, ideas are offered to illustrate how mental health professionals can promote the therapeutic relationship and facilitate positive change through respectful and effective practices. This book introduces readers to the importance of language in both the construction of problems and solutions. Readers are offered multiple ways of using language as a vehicle for promoting change. While new ideas are offered, the book also honors traditional theoretical underpinnings while challenging readers to work collaboratively with clients to find out what works for them.For counseling students, practicing counselors, social workers, etc. This book offers the new clinician and the seasoned one a perspective that honors the contributions of clients and clinicians alike while working toward the achievement of realistic and attainable outcomes.
Category: Psychology

Identity Politics Reconsidered

Author : L. Alcoff
ISBN : 9781403983398
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 63.55 MB
Format : PDF
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Based on the ongoing work of the agenda-setting Future of Minority Studies national research project, Identity Politics Reconsidered reconceptualizes the scholarly and political significance of social identity. It focuses on the deployment of 'identity' within ethnic, women's, disability, and gay and lesbian studies in order to stimulate discussion about issues that are simultaneously theoretical and practical, ranging from ethics and epistemology to political theory and pedagogical practice. This collection of powerful essays by both well-known and emerging scholars offers original answers to questions concerning the analytical legitimacy of 'identity' and 'experience', and the relationships among cultural autonomy, moral universalism and progressive politics.
Category: Social Science

Panic Diaries

Author : Jackie Orr
ISBN : 9780822387367
Genre : Psychology
File Size : 84.27 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
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Part cultural history, part sociological critique, and part literary performance, Panic Diaries explores the technological and social construction of individual and collective panic. Jackie Orr looks at instances of panic and its “cures” in the twentieth-century United States: from the mass hysteria following the 1938 radio broadcast of H. G. Wells’s War of the Worlds to an individual woman swallowing a pill to control the “panic disorder” officially recognized by the American Psychiatric Association in 1980. Against a backdrop of Cold War anxieties over atomic attack, Orr highlights the entanglements of knowledge and power in efforts to reconceive panic and its prevention as problems in communication and information feedback. Throughout, she reveals the shifting techniques of power and social engineering underlying the ways that scientific and social scientific discourses—including crowd psychology, Cold War cybernetics, and contemporary psychiatry—have rendered panic an object of technoscientific management. Orr, who has experienced panic attacks herself, kept a diary of her participation as a research subject in clinical trials for the Upjohn Company’s anti-anxiety drug Xanax. This “panic diary” grounds her study and suggests the complexity of her desire to track the diffusion and regulation of panic in U.S. society. Orr’s historical research, theoretical reflections, and biographical narrative combine in this remarkable and compelling genealogy, which documents the manipulation of panic by the media, the social sciences and psychiatry, the U.S. military and government, and transnational drug companies.
Category: Psychology