THE POWER OF THE ZOOT YOUTH CULTURE AND RESISTANCE DURING WORLD WAR II AMERICAN CROSSROADS

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The Power Of The Zoot

Author : Luis Alvarez
ISBN : 9780520261549
Genre : Design
File Size : 64.22 MB
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Flamboyant zoot suit culture, with its ties to fashion, jazz and swing music, jitterbug and Lindy Hop dancing, unique patterns of speech, and even risqu� experimentation with gender and sexuality, captivated the country's youth in the 1940s. The Power of the Zoot is the first book to give national consideration to this famous phenomenon. Providing a new history of youth culture based on rare, in-depth interviews with former zoot-suiters, Luis Alvarez explores race, region, and the politics of culture in urban America during World War II. He argues that Mexican American and African American youths, along with many nisei and white youths, used popular culture to oppose accepted modes of youthful behavior, the dominance of white middle-class norms, and expectations from within their own communities.
Category: Design

Wild Tongues

Author : Rita Urquijo-Ruiz
ISBN : 9780292723849
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 78.10 MB
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Tracing the configuration of the slapstick, destitute Peladita/Peladito and the Pachuca/Pachuco (depicted in flashy zoot suits) from 1928 to 2004, Wild Tongues is an ambitious, extensive examination of social order in Mexican and Chicana/o cultural productions in literature, theater, film, music, and performance art. From the use of the Peladita and the Peladito as stock characters who criticized various aspects of the Mexican government in the 1920s and 1930s to contemporary performance art by María Elena Gaitán and Dan Guerrero, which yields a feminist and queer-studies interpretation, Rita Urquijo-Ruiz emphasizes the transnational capitalism at play in these comic voices. Her study encompasses both sides of the border, including the use of the Pachuca and the Pachuco as anti-establishment, marginal figures in the United States. The result is a historically grounded, interdisciplinary approach that reimagines the limitations of nation-centered thinking and reading. Beginning with Daniel Venegas’s 1928 novel, Las aventuras de don Chipote o Cuando los pericos mamen, Rita Urquijo-Ruiz’s Wild Tongues demonstrates early uses of the Peladito to call attention to the brutal physical demands placed on the undocumented Mexican laborer. It explores Teatro de Carpa (tent theater) in-depth as well, bringing to light the experience of Mexican Peladita Amelia Wilhelmy, whose “La Willy” was famous for portraying a cross-dressing male soldier who criticizes the failed Revolution. In numerous other explorations such as these, the political, economic, and social power of creativity continually takes center stage.
Category: Social Science

The Struggle In Black And Brown

Author : Brian D. Behnken
ISBN : 9780803262713
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 31.24 MB
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It might seem that African Americans and Mexican Americans would have common cause in matters of civil rights. This volume, which considers relations between blacks and browns during the civil rights era, carefully examines the complex and multifaceted realities that complicate such assumptionsãand that revise our view of both the civil rights struggle and black-brown relations in recent history. Unique in its focus, innovative in its methods, and broad in its approach to various locales and time periods, the book provides key perspectives to understanding the development of Americaês ethnic and sociopolitical landscape. These essays focus chiefly on the Southwest, where Mexican Americans and African Americans have had a long history of civil rights activism. Among the cases the authors take up are the unification of black and Chicano civil rights and labor groups in California; divisions between Mexican Americans and African Americans generated by the War on Poverty; and cultural connections established by black and Chicano musicians during the period. Together these cases present the first truly nuanced picture of the conflict and cooperation, goodwill and animosity, unity and disunity that played a critical role in the history of both black-brown relations and the battle for civil rights. Their insights are especially timely, as black-brown relations occupy an increasingly important role in the nationês public life.
Category: Social Science

Raza S Migra No

Author : Jimmy Patiño
ISBN : 9781469635576
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 46.22 MB
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As immigration from Mexico to the United States grew through the 1970s and 1980s, the Border Patrol, police, and other state agents exerted increasing violence against ethnic Mexicans in San Diego's volatile border region. In response, many San Diego activists rallied around the leadership of the small-scale print shop owner Herman Baca in the Chicano movement to empower Mexican Americans through Chicano self-determination. The combination of increasing repression and Chicano activism gradually produced a new conception of ethnic and racial community that included both established Mexican Americans and new Mexican immigrants. Here, Jimmy Patino narrates the rise of this Chicano/Mexicano consciousness and the dawning awareness that Mexican Americans and Mexicans would have to work together to fight border enforcement policies that subjected Latinos of all statuses to legal violence. By placing the Chicano and Latino civil rights struggle on explicitly transnational terrain, Patino fundamentally reorients the understanding of the Chicano movement. Ultimately, Patino tells the story of how Chicano/Mexicano politics articulated an "abolitionist" position on immigration--going beyond the agreed upon assumptions shared by liberals and conservatives alike that deportations are inherent to any solutions to the still burgeoning immigration debate.
Category: Social Science

Land Of A Thousand Dances

Author : David Reyes
ISBN : UOM:39015080834826
Genre : Music
File Size : 20.21 MB
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"It's fascinating to read this alternative history of pop music, asLand of a Thousand Dancesoffers a wealth of anecdotes, interviews, and facts that have never been so meticulously documented. The book helps fill one of the biggest gaps in the rock timeline, ensuring that rock 'n' roll's Chicano roots will not be forgotten."--A. V. Club "Authors [David] Reyes and [Tom] Waldman give a flavorful overview of the ever-changing East L.A. scene. . . . They note that barrio culture, which so richly intertwines American and Mexican traditions, has given rise to groups who move through many different types of music with ease, as well as the type of fans who can appreciate them all."--Raza Report "[Land of a Thousand Dances]is written with insight and intelligence and I highly recommend it."--Mark Guerro, member of Mark & the Escorts, Tango, and Radio Aztlan "The first edition of this definitive history of California Chicano rock pioneers, published in 1998, highlighted such early groups as Ritchie Valens, Cannibal & the Headhunters, and Thee Midniters as well as punk leaders the Plugz, culminating with the musically eclectic Los Lobos. In this revised and expanded edition, authors Reyes, a Chicano music historian and archivist, and Waldman(Not Much Left: The Fate of Liberalism in America)include material about newer artists such as Quetzal and Lysa Flores. In the ten years since the book was first published, California's Spanish-speaking population has dramatically increased, and there is growing interest in Mexican rock and all the other Mexican musical genres. This book should appeal to any fan of Latino rock who wants to know about its roots and development."--Library Journal For this edition, the authors have written a new introduction.
Category: Music

Transnational Crossroads

Author : Camilla Fojas
ISBN : 9780803240889
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 31.40 MB
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The twentieth century was a time of unprecedented migration and interaction for Asian, Latin American, and Pacific Islander cultures in the Americas and the American Pacific. Some of these ethnic groups already had historic ties, but technology, migration, and globalization during the twentieth century brought them into even closer contact. Transnational Crossroads explores and triangulates for the first time the interactions and contacts among these three cultural groups that were brought together by the expanding American empire from 1867 to 1950. Through a comparative framework, this volume weaves together narratives of U.S. and Spanish empire, globalization, resistance, and identity, as well as social, labor, and political movements. Contributors examine multiethnic celebrities and key figures, migratory paths, cultural productions, and social and political formations among these three groups. Engaging multiple disciplines and methodologies, these studies of Asian American, Latin American, and Pacific Islander cultural interactions explode traditional notions of ethnic studies and introduce new approaches to transnational and comparative studies of the Americas and the American Pacific.
Category: Social Science

The Game Must Go On

Author : John Klima
ISBN : 9781250064790
Genre : History
File Size : 69.48 MB
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Baseball and the struggle to keep the game going at home during the war; the pivotal role played by President Roosevelt; and the divergent career paths of Detroit Tigers slugger Hank Greenberg and St. Louis Browns outfielder Pete Gray. Greenberg was the top slugger in the game when he joined the Army in 1941 and did not return to the majors until mid-1945. He represented the star player gone to war - players such as Joe DiMaggio, Ted Williams, Bob Feller, Warren Spahn and other legends who sacrificed large parts of their careers for the war effort. Many other lesser-known but courageous ballplayers saw combat on land, sea and air - in fighting against the Germans and the Japanese. Taking their place were replacement players who didn't belong in the majors in the first place, but whose resolve to see the game go on helped push the country to victory. Pete Gray was the most extreme replacement player of them all - a one-armed outfielder who played the 1945 season with the Browns. He overcame the odds to fulfill his dream and in doing so became a shining example of baseball on the home front. Together, everyone pulled together for victory, and Greenberg and Gray played each other in the last pennant race of World War II, because as FDR said before he died...The Game Must Go On.
Category: History

Abrazando El Esp Ritu

Author : Dr. Ana Elizabeth Rosas
ISBN : 9780520958654
Genre : History
File Size : 26.56 MB
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Structured to meet employers’ needs for low-wage farm workers, the well-known Bracero Program recruited thousands of Mexicans to perform physical labor in the United States between 1942 and 1964 in exchange for remittances sent back to Mexico. As partners and family members were dispersed across national borders, interpersonal relationships were transformed. The prolonged absences of Mexican workers, mostly men, forced women and children at home to inhabit new roles, create new identities, and cope with long-distance communication from fathers, brothers, and sons. Drawing on an extraordinary range of sources, Ana Elizabeth Rosas uncovers a previously hidden history of transnational family life. Intimate and personal experiences are revealed to show how Mexican immigrants and their families were not passive victims but instead found ways to embrace the spirit (abrazando el espíritu) of making and implementing difficult decisions concerning their family situations—creating new forms of affection, gender roles, and economic survival strategies with long-term consequences.
Category: History

Spaces Of Conflict Sounds Of Solidarity

Author : Gaye Theresa Johnson
ISBN : 9780520275287
Genre : History
File Size : 70.92 MB
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In Spaces of Conflict, Sounds of Solidarity, Gaye Theresa Johnson examines interracial anti-racist alliances, divisions among aggrieved minority communities, and the cultural expressions and spatial politics that emerge from the mutual struggles of Blacks and Chicanos in Los Angeles from the 1940s to the present. Johnson argues that struggles waged in response to institutional and social repression have created both moments and movements in which Blacks and Chicanos have unmasked power imbalances, sought recognition, and forged solidarities by embracing the strategies, cultures, and politics of each others' experiences. At the center of this study is the theory of spatial entitlement: the spatial strategies and vernaculars utilized by working class youth to resist the demarcations of race and class that emerged in the postwar era. In this important new book, Johnson reveals how racial alliances and antagonisms between Blacks and Chicanos in L.A. had spatial as well as racial dimensions.
Category: History