THE NEW SUBURBAN HISTORY

Download The New Suburban History ebook PDF or Read Online books in PDF, EPUB, and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to THE NEW SUBURBAN HISTORY book pdf for free now.

The New Suburban History

Author : Thomas J. Sugrue
ISBN : 9780226456638
Genre : Architecture
File Size : 79.68 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 593
Read : 910

America has become a nation of suburbs. Confronting the popular image of suburbia as simply a refuge for affluent whites, The New Suburban History rejects the stereotypes of a conformist and conflict-free suburbia. The seemingly calm streets of suburbia were, in fact, battlegrounds over race, class, and politics. With this collection, Kevin Kruse and Thomas Sugrue argue that suburbia must be understood as a central factor in the modern American experience. Kruse and Sugrue here collect ten essays—augmented by their provocative introduction—that challenge our understanding of suburbia. Drawing from original research on suburbs across the country, the contributors recast important political and social issues in the context of suburbanization. Their essays reveal the role suburbs have played in the transformation of American liberalism and conservatism; the contentious politics of race, class, and ethnicity; and debates about the environment, land use, and taxation. The contributors move the history of African Americans, Latinos, Asians, and blue-collar workers from the margins to the mainstream of suburban history. From this broad perspective, these innovative historians explore the way suburbs affect—and are affected by—central cities, competing suburbs, and entire regions. The results, they show, are far-reaching: the emergence of a suburban America has reshaped national politics, fostered new social movements, and remade the American landscape. The New Suburban History offers nothing less than a new American history—one that claims the nation cannot be fully understood without a history of American suburbs at its very center.
Category: Architecture

New Suburban Stories

Author : Martin Dines
ISBN : 9781472510327
Genre : Literary Criticism
File Size : 25.74 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 722
Read : 1199

Exploringfiction, film and art from across the USA, South America, Asia, Europe and Australia, New Suburban Stories brings together new research from leadinginternational scholars to examine cultural representations of the suburbs, hometo a rapidly increasing proportion of the world's population. Focussing inparticular on works that challenge conventional attitudes to suburbia, the bookconsiders how suburban communities have taken control of their ownrepresentationto tell their own storiesin contemporary novels, poetry, autobiography, cinema, social media and publicart tell the story of how suburban.
Category: Literary Criticism

The New American Suburb

Author : Katrin B. Anacker
ISBN : 9781317023111
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 38.5 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 359
Read : 290

The majority of Americans live in suburbs and until about a decade or so ago, most suburbs had been assumed to be non-Hispanic White, affluent, and without problems. However, recent data have shown that there are changing trends among U.S. suburbs. This book provides timely analyses of current suburban issues by utilizing recently published data from the 2010 Census and American Community Survey to address key themes including suburban poverty; racial and ethnic change and suburban decline; suburban foreclosures; and suburban policy.
Category: Social Science

Case Studies In Interdisciplinary Research

Author : Allen F. Repko
ISBN : 9781452235981
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 20.71 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 171
Read : 321

Case Studies in Interdisciplinary Research successfully applies the model of the interdisciplinary research process outlined by author Allen F. Repko in Interdisciplinary Research, (SAGE ©2008) to a wide spectrum of challenging research questions. Self-contained case studies, written by leaders in interdisciplinary research, and utilizing best-practice techniques in conducting interdisciplinary research shows students how to apply the interdisciplinary research process to a variety of problems.
Category: Social Science

The History Of White People

Author : Nell Irvin Painter
ISBN : 039307949X
Genre : History
File Size : 52.55 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 268
Read : 306

A New York Times bestseller: “This terrific new book . . . [explores] the ‘notion of whiteness,’ an idea as dangerous as it is seductive.”—Boston Globe Telling perhaps the most important forgotten story in American history, eminent historian Nell Irvin Painter guides us through more than two thousand years of Western civilization, illuminating not only the invention of race but also the frequent praise of “whiteness” for economic, scientific, and political ends. A story filled with towering historical figures, The History of White People closes a huge gap in literature that has long focused on the non-white and forcefully reminds us that the concept of “race” is an all-too-human invention whose meaning, importance, and reality have changed as it has been driven by a long and rich history of events.
Category: History

Suburban Governance

Author : Pierre Hamel
ISBN : 9781442663572
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 63.77 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 649
Read : 956

North American gated communities, African squatter settlements, European housing estates, and Chinese urban villages all share one thing in common: they represent types of suburban space. As suburban growth becomes the dominant urban process of the twenty-first century, its governance poses an increasingly pressing set of global challenges. In Suburban Governance: A Global View, editors Pierre Hamel and Roger Keil have assembled a groundbreaking set of essays by leading urban scholars that assess how governance regulates the creation of the world’s suburban spaces and everyday life within them. With contributors from ten countries on five continents, this collection covers the full breadth of contemporary developments in suburban governance. Examining the classic North American model of suburbia, contemporary alternatives in Europe and Latin America, and the emerging suburbanisms of Africa and Asia, Suburban Governance offers a strong analytical introduction to a vital topic in contemporary urban studies.
Category: Political Science

Crabgrass Crucible

Author : Christopher C. Sellers
ISBN : 9780807869901
Genre : History
File Size : 67.65 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 646
Read : 795

Although suburb-building created major environmental problems, Christopher Sellers demonstrates that the environmental movement originated within suburbs--not just in response to unchecked urban sprawl. Drawn to the countryside as early as the late nineteenth century, new suburbanites turned to taming the wildness of their surroundings. They cultivated a fondness for the natural world around them, and in the decades that followed, they became sensitized to potential threats. Sellers shows how the philosophy, science, and emotions that catalyzed the environmental movement sprang directly from suburbanites' lives and their ideas about nature, as well as the unique ecology of the neighborhoods in which they dwelt. Sellers focuses on the spreading edges of New York and Los Angeles over the middle of the twentieth century to create an intimate portrait of what it was like to live amid suburban nature. As suburbanites learned about their land, became aware of pollution, and saw the forests shrinking around them, the vulnerability of both their bodies and their homes became apparent. Worries crossed lines of class and race and necessitated new ways of thinking and acting, Sellers argues, concluding that suburb-dwellers, through the knowledge and politics they forged, deserve much of the credit for inventing modern environmentalism.
Category: History

White Flight

Author : Kevin M. Kruse
ISBN : 9781400848973
Genre : History
File Size : 29.48 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 602
Read : 260

During the civil rights era, Atlanta thought of itself as "The City Too Busy to Hate," a rare place in the South where the races lived and thrived together. Over the course of the 1960s and 1970s, however, so many whites fled the city for the suburbs that Atlanta earned a new nickname: "The City Too Busy Moving to Hate." In this reappraisal of racial politics in modern America, Kevin Kruse explains the causes and consequences of "white flight" in Atlanta and elsewhere. Seeking to understand segregationists on their own terms, White Flight moves past simple stereotypes to explore the meaning of white resistance. In the end, Kruse finds that segregationist resistance, which failed to stop the civil rights movement, nevertheless managed to preserve the world of segregation and even perfect it in subtler and stronger forms. Challenging the conventional wisdom that white flight meant nothing more than a literal movement of whites to the suburbs, this book argues that it represented a more important transformation in the political ideology of those involved. In a provocative revision of postwar American history, Kruse demonstrates that traditional elements of modern conservatism, such as hostility to the federal government and faith in free enterprise, underwent important transformations during the postwar struggle over segregation. Likewise, white resistance gave birth to several new conservative causes, like the tax revolt, tuition vouchers, and privatization of public services. Tracing the journey of southern conservatives from white supremacy to white suburbia, Kruse locates the origins of modern American politics. Some images inside the book are unavailable due to digital copyright restrictions.
Category: History

Creative Margins

Author : Alison L. Bain
ISBN : 9781442666832
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 80.27 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 133
Read : 836

Suburbs can be incubators of creativity: innovative and complex, but all too often underappreciated. In Creative Margins, Alison L. Bain documents the unique role of Canadian artists and cultural workers in suburban place-formation and dismantles mischaracterizations of suburbs as cultural wastelands. Creative Margins interweaves stories of the challenges and opportunities presented by the creation of culture in suburbs, focusing on Etobicoke and Mississauga outside Toronto, and Surrey and North Vancouver outside Vancouver. The book investigates whether the creative process unfolds differently for suburban and urban cultural workers, as well as how this process is affected by the presence or absence of cultural infrastructure and planning initiatives. Bain shows how suburban culture can enhance a city-region’s vitality and sustainability. This book firmly debunks the myth of culture as a solely urban phenomenon and demonstrates the social and economic merits of investing in suburban art and culture.
Category: Social Science

Popular Culture In The Age Of White Flight

Author : Eric Avila
ISBN : 9780520248113
Genre : History
File Size : 21.23 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 429
Read : 669

"In Popular Culture in the Age of White Flight, Eric Avila offers a unique argument about the restructuring of urban space in the two decades following World War II and the role played by new suburban spaces in dramatically transforming the political culture of the United States. Avila's work helps us see how and why the postwar suburb produced the political culture of 'balanced budget conservatism' that is now the dominant force in politics, how the eclipse of the New Deal since the 1970s represents not only a change of views but also an alteration of spaces."—George Lipsitz, author of The Possessive Investment in Whiteness
Category: History