THE MINES HANDBOOK

Download The Mines Handbook ebook PDF or Read Online books in PDF, EPUB, and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to THE MINES HANDBOOK book pdf for free now.

The Mines Handbook

Author : Walter Garfield Neale
ISBN : NYPL:33433062729094
Genre : Mineral industries
File Size : 24.17 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 298
Read : 438

Category: Mineral industries

The Mines Handbook

Author : Walter Harvey Weed
ISBN : UOM:39015071229697
Genre : Mines and mineral resources
File Size : 88.81 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 910
Read : 607

Category: Mines and mineral resources

Mines Register

Author : Horace Jared Stevens
ISBN : UOM:39015067293707
Genre : Mineral industries
File Size : 49.67 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 948
Read : 1259

Category: Mineral industries

Mines Register

Author :
ISBN : LCCN:01030837
Genre : Mineral industries
File Size : 45.37 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 295
Read : 402

Category: Mineral industries

Northwest Mines Handbook

Author : Sidney Norman
ISBN : HARVARD:32044105551873
Genre : Mineral industries
File Size : 48.22 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 826
Read : 468

Category: Mineral industries

Project Management For Mining Handbook For Delivering Project Success Hickson Owe 2015

Author : SME Publishing
ISBN :
Genre : Technology & Engineering
File Size : 90.41 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 406
Read : 165

Objective of This Book The book has been written to help miners succeed in the exceedingly challenging world of project management. Mining projects are complex. The path to successful project completion is imbedded with situational uncertainties and strewn with obstacles. These pages offer practical solutions to remove the obstacles and provide sound insight to cope with the uncertainties. The goal is to bring the project management world into better focus, to place project managers in positions where they can anticipate rather than respond, and to lay out the project execution path in straightforward patterns with understandable success strategies that will achieve the desired outcome. More specifically, Project Management for Mining provides the originator of a mining idea or mineral opportunity with the necessary guidance to develop that idea or opportunity into a well-defined project that will successfully meet the corporation’s business objectives. This book presents a best practice process for steering development of the project through senior management approval and on-site execution. The intent is for this book to serve as a handy reference of proven techniques and winning approaches for effective project management within the mining industry, and to impart knowledge to all those who seek to manage mining project work, not just the project manager. The reason this book is titled Project Management for Mining rather than something like A Project Manager’s Manual is because it is a manifestation of the authors’ goal to create a go-to handbook that will be drawn from on a regular basis, rather than a little-used textbook lying on a dusty library shelf. The book identifies the roles, responsibilities, and accountabilities of the individuals involved in the development and execution of the project. It provides a skeleton for, and reference to, the various documents that compose the mining industry’s soundest practices, and it identifies the interrelationships between the parties and disciplines in a typical project. By following the procedures contained within this book, a mining organization can be assured that the project is properly characterized, project viability has been adequately challenged, the correct questions are being answered, and the appropriate process is being implemented. 3 Copyright © 2015 Society for Mining, Metallurgy & Exploration Inc. All rights reserved. 4 Chapter 1 Book Scope The book provides a standardized approach to the project management process for mining projects, regardless of magnitude or location. The practices described here address international and domestic projects, grassroots and brownfield, with capital costs ranging from a few million dollars to multibillions. Although the emphasis in this book and the examples drawn are mostly from metal mining, the intent is that the information herein will be similarly valuable to mining personnel serving the energy, industrial, and agricultural mineral worlds. The book clarifies what should be done regardless of who does it. Using the practices presented in this book, the project manager can control and coordinate the project activities. In addition to acting as a reference text for the participants involved in a project, the book also provides a basis for training project personnel in setting up and managing mining projects. Thus, this book serves as a one-stop guide to the project team with these questions: ■■ Why do it? ■■ Which path should be chosen? ■■ What has to be done? ■■ Where? ■■ When? ■■ In what sequence? ■■ How? ■■ By whom? The book is a tool for the project team to draw from when facing unfamiliar problems, and to provide project staff with a fuller understanding of how to achieve project effectiveness. When applied with creative thinking and good judgment, the procedures described herein are—together with experience, leadership, and dedicated people—the necessary ingredients for quality project performance. Target Audience The target audience of this book includes not only the project manager but also all those mining personnel with an interest in or responsibility for successful project execution, for example, ■■ Corporate leaders who have to approve the project; ■■ Project sponsors who have to keep stakeholders satisfied with project progress; ■■ Geologic discoverers, developers, and entrepreneurs who want “their baby” built; ■■ Project team members who have to execute the project; and ■■ Mine operators who have to take delivery of the completed project. While the prime target audience of this book consists of mining company project personnel (i.e., the Owner’s project management team), this book should also provide assistance to project management personnel from within the engineering, procurement, and construction management (EPCM) community who serve the minerals industry. This book can be a source of understanding for these EPCM organizations about what their client organization is typically seeking. Whenever knowledge within this book is applied, the guiding axiom is to keep it as simple as possible and do not overcomplicate the project. Keep the fun in the journey. Copyright © 2015 Society for Mining, Metallurgy & Exploration Inc. All rights reserved. Introduction 5 Definition of a Project A project is a time-limited, goal-directed undertaking that requires a combination of human, mechanical, technical, and financial resources brought together in a temporary organization to achieve a specified purpose. A project has a single set of objectives that takes the status quo and changes it into something better. When these goals are reached, the project is complete. The ultimate goal is to bring economic benefit to the corporation, that is, to reduce cost, expand production, add revenue, and/or extend property life. Mining projects are mostly unique and fall outside of the normal course of business routine or operational services. To successfully achieve project completion, a series of nonrecurring but connected events have to be properly managed within a finite and well-defined life span. In other words, to create a successful outcome for a project, a definite path with a defined strategy has to be organized within a formal framework. For most mining corporations, this formal framework means a development program under an assigned leader, backed by an approved Authorization for Expenditure (AFE), and accompanied by supporting documents, a feasibility study, and a Project Execution Plan (PEP). The defined life span has an identifiable start point, a fixed boundary, and an equally identifiable end point. What Is Project Management? Project management is the process by which a team of people successfully guide a project using the elements of planning, analyzing, directing, monitoring, problem solving, and communicating. They take an idea from the opportunity stage through development to the achievement of specific, established corporate objectives within set cost, schedule, and quality constraints. Figure 1.1 illustrates, in a flowchart format, how these various project management activities all tie together. The preceding paragraph defines project management within the North American and U.K. cultural contexts, in which the two authors have been nurtured. As Crawford, Pollack, and England (2007) point out in their examination of global project management standards and terminologies, there are variations in the understanding of the term project management even though it is an extremely common, profession-specific term. The influence of various cultures places different emphases on the practice of project management within the countries of the world, along with different bases of knowledge and diverse understandings by practitioners. So while it is recognized that there are subtle variants within the global community about what project management should entail, the authors have found that there are far more similarities than differences. Hence this book should be capable of usefully serving the mining community both within and beyond the American shores. Purpose of Project Management Project management is not a complex process. There are four basic steps to a successful project outcome: 1. Develop a definitive project scope and a project-specific execution plan. 2. Use qualified management personnel. 3. Create the project control mechanisms up-front (documents, tools, and procedures). 4. Control engineering, construction, and start-up activities during project execution. Copyright © 2015 Society for Mining, Metallurgy & Exploration Inc. All rights reserved.
Category: Technology & Engineering

African Mines Handbook

Author :
ISBN : STANFORD:36105121596766
Genre : Mineral industries
File Size : 21.12 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 361
Read : 927

Category: Mineral industries

East Asia And The Global Economy

Author : Stephen G. Bunker
ISBN : 0801885930
Genre : Business & Economics
File Size : 61.15 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 421
Read : 421

After World War II, Japan reinvented itself as a shipbuilding powerhouse and began its rapid ascent in the global economy. Its expansion strategy integrated raw material procurement, the redesign of global transportation infrastructure, and domestic industrialization. In this authoritative and engaging study, Stephen G. Bunker and Paul S. Ciccantell identify the key factors in Japan’s economic growth and the effects this growth had on the reorganization of significant sectors of the global economy. Bunker and Ciccantell discuss what drove Japan’s economic expansion, how Japan globalized the work economy to support it, and why this spectacular growth came to a dramatic halt in the 1990s. Drawing on studies of ore mining, steel making, corporate sector reorganization, and port/rail development, they provide valuable insight into technical processes as well as specific patterns of corporate investment. East Asia and the Global Economy introduces a theory of "new historical materialism" that explains the success of Japan and other world industrial powers. Here, the authors assert that the pattern of Japan’s ascent is essential for understanding China’s recent path of economic growth and dominance and anticipating what the future may hold.
Category: Business & Economics