THE LAST CIVILIZED PLACE SIJILMASA AND ITS SAHARAN DESTINY

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The Last Civilized Place

Author : Ronald A. Messier
ISBN : 9780292766655
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 46.73 MB
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Set along the Sahara's edge, Sijilmasa was an African El Dorado, a legendary city of gold. But unlike El Dorado, Sijilmasa was a real city, the pivot in the gold trade between ancient Ghana and the Mediterranean world. Following its emergence as an independent city-state controlling a monopoly on gold during its first 250 years, Sijilmasa was incorporated into empire—Almoravid, Almohad, and onward—leading to the "last civilized place" becoming the cradle of today's Moroccan dynasty, the Alaouites. Sijilmasa's millennium of greatness ebbed with periods of war, renewal, and abandonment. Today, its ruins lie adjacent to and under the modern town of Rissani, bypassed by time. The Moroccan-American Project at Sijilmasa draws on archaeology, historical texts, field reconnaissance, oral tradition, and legend to weave the story of how this fabled city mastered its fate. The authors' deep local knowledge and interpretation of the written and ecological record allow them to describe how people and place molded four distinct periods in the city's history. Messier and Miller compare models of Islamic cities to what they found on the ground to understand how Sijilmasa functioned as a city. Continuities and discontinuities between Sijilmasa and the contemporary landscape sharpen questions regarding the nature of human life on the rim of the desert. What, they ask, allows places like Sijilmasa to rise to greatness? What causes them to fall away and disappear into the desert sands?
Category: Social Science

Counting Islam

Author : Tarek Masoud
ISBN : 9781139991865
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 82.67 MB
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Why does Islam seem to dominate Egyptian politics, especially when the country's endemic poverty and deep economic inequality would seem to render it promising terrain for a politics of radical redistribution rather than one of religious conservativism? This book argues that the answer lies not in the political unsophistication of voters, the subordination of economic interests to spiritual ones, or the ineptitude of secular and leftist politicians, but in organizational and social factors that shape the opportunities of parties in authoritarian and democratizing systems to reach potential voters. Tracing the performance of Islamists and their rivals in Egyptian elections over the course of almost forty years, this book not only explains why Islamists win elections, but illuminates the possibilities for the emergence in Egypt of the kind of political pluralism that is at the heart of what we expect from democracy.
Category: Political Science

Sustainable Diplomacy

Author : D. Wellman
ISBN : 9781403980977
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 44.32 MB
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Drawing on a variety of disciplines, Sustainable Diplomacy is a highly constructive work. Set in the context of modern Moroccan-Spanish relations, this text is a direct critique of realism as it is practiced in modern diplomacy. Proposing a new eco-centric approach to relations between nation-states and bioregions, Wellman presents the case for Ecological Realism, an undergirding philosophy for conducting a diplomacy which values the role of popular religions, ecological histories, and the consumption and waste patterns of national populations. Sustainable Diplomacy is thus a means of building relations not only between elites but also between people on the ground, as they together face the real possibility of global ecological destruction.
Category: Political Science

Empires Of Medieval West Africa

Author : David C. Conrad
ISBN : 9781438103198
Genre : Juvenile Nonfiction
File Size : 33.40 MB
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Drawing on a rich oral tradition, numerous trips to the region, and the latest scholarship available on this important but little-studied era, scholar and author David Conrad explores the people, places, and ideas that made up this trio of empires. Connections to life today include the continuing impact of Islam and tribal groups in Africa, and the influence of the medieval traditions on modern music and cuisine.
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Africans

Author : John Iliffe
ISBN : 0521484227
Genre : History
File Size : 67.77 MB
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This history of Africa from the origins of mankind to the South African general election of 1994 refocuses African history on the peopling of an environmentally hostile continent. The social, economic and political institutions of the African continent were designed to ensure survival and maximize numbers, but in the context of medical progress and other twentieth-century innovations these institutions have bred the most rapid population growth the world has ever seen. The history of the continent is thus a single story binding living Africans to the earliest human ancestors.
Category: History

Life Among The Anthros And Other Essays

Author : Clifford Geertz
ISBN : 1400834546
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 67.14 MB
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Clifford Geertz (1926-2006) was perhaps the most influential anthropologist of our time, but his influence extended far beyond his field to encompass all facets of contemporary life. Nowhere were his gifts for directness, humor, and steady revelation more evident than in the pages of the New York Review of Books, where for nearly four decades he shared his acute vision of the world in all its peculiarity. This book brings together the finest of Geertz's review essays from the New York Review along with a representative selection of later pieces written at the height of his powers, some that first appeared in periodicals such as Dissent, others never before published. This collection exemplifies Geertz's extraordinary range of concerns, beginning with his first essay for the Review in 1967, in which he reviews, with muffled hilarity, the anthropologist Bronislaw Malinowski. This book includes Geertz's unflinching meditations on Western academia's encounters with the non-Western world, and on the shifting and clashing places of societies in the world generally. Geertz writes eloquently and arrestingly about such major figures as Gandhi, Foucault, and Genet, and on topics as varied as Islam, globalization, feminism, and the failings of nationalism. Life among the Anthros and Other Essays demonstrates Geertz's uncommon wisdom and consistently keen and hopeful humor, confirming his status as one of our most important and enduring public intellectuals.
Category: Social Science

Mecca Of Revolution

Author : Jeffrey James Byrne
ISBN : 9780199899142
Genre : Algeria
File Size : 63.13 MB
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Amid the burgeoning literature on the connections between the global north and the global south, Mecca of Revolution is a pure example of post-colonial, or "south-south," international history. Through an examination of Algeria's interactions with the wider world, from the beginning of its warof independence to the fall of its first post-colonial regime, the Third Worldist perspective on the twentieth century comes into view. Hitherto dominant historical paradigms such as the Cold War are situated in the larger context of decolonization and the re-inclusion of the large majority ofhumanity in international affairs. At the same time, groundbreaking research in the archives of Algeria and a half-dozen other countries enable Mecca of Revolution to advance beyond the focus on discourse analysis that has typified previous studies of Third World internationalism. It demystifiesterms like Non-Alignment, Afro-Asianism, and Bandung, and sheds new light on the relationships between the emergent elites of Africa, the Middle East, Asian, and Latin America. As one of the most prominent sites of post-colonial socialist experimentation and an epicenter of transnational guerrilla activity, Algeria was at the heart of efforts to transform global political and economic structures. Yet, the book also shows how Third Worldism evolved from a subversivetransnational phenomenon into a mode of elite cooperation that reinforced the authority of the post-colonial state. In so doing, the Third World movement played a key role in the construction of the totalizing international order of the late-twentieth century. Ultimately, Mecca of Revolution showsthe "post-colonial world" is all of our world.
Category: Algeria

The Almoravids And The Meanings Of Jihad

Author : Ronald A. Messier
ISBN : 9780313385902
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 49.32 MB
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This book offers a scholarly, highly readable account of the 11th-12th century rulers of Morocco and Muslim Spain who offered a full range of meanings of jihad and challenged Ibn Khaldun's paradigm for the rise and fall of regimes. • Contains sketches of three principle characters (Ibn Yasin, Zaynab, and El Cid) as well as the Koranic inscription and the plan of the Sijilmasa mosque • Includes maps showing various places in North Africa and Southern Spain discussed in the text • Photographs of structures, archaeological sites, and coins that are mentioned in the narrative • A two-section bibliography contains both medieval Arabic sources and modern sources • The glossary defines place names, tribes, tribal confederations, titles, and technical Islamic terms
Category: Political Science

Africa Under Colonial Domination 1880 1935

Author : A. Adu Boahen
ISBN : 0520067029
Genre : History
File Size : 85.20 MB
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Explores how the different peoples of Africa view their civilizations and shows the historical relationships between the various parts of the continent, historical connections with other continents, and Africa's contribution to the development of human civilization.
Category: History

Encyclopedia Of African History

Author : Kevin Shillington
ISBN : UOM:39015060117283
Genre : History
File Size : 77.28 MB
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Covering the entire continent from Morocco, Libya, and Egypt in the north to the Cape of Good Hope in the south, and the surrounding islands from Cape Verde in the west to Madagascar, Mauritius, and Seychelles in the east, theEncyclopedia of African Historyis a new A-Z reference resource on the history of the entire African continent. With entries ranging from the earliest evolution of human beings in Africa to the beginning of the twenty-first century, this comprehensive three volume Encyclopedia is the first reference of this scale and scope. In nearly 1,100 entries, theEncyclopedianot only examines the well-established topics in African history but also looks at the social, economic, linguistic, anthropological, and political subjects that are being re-evaluated or newly opened for historical analysis by recent research and publication. All entries are at least 1,000 words in length and range from factual narrative entries to thematic and analytical discussions, and combinations ofall these. Longer entries range from 3,000 to 5,000 words in length and analyze broader topics such as regional general surveys and wide historical themes including the African Diaspora and Africa in World History. TheEncyclopedia of African Historyis an easily accessible resource that provides an introduction to virtually all aspects of African history from the New Kingdom of Ancient Egypt to Nigeria's Fourth Republic. As the only reference resource with the latest in African history scholarship, this Encyclopedia is essential for those who are involved in teaching, researching, or studying Africa and its history. Also includes 99 maps.
Category: History