THE LAST CIVILIZED PLACE SIJILMASA AND ITS SAHARAN DESTINY

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The Last Civilized Place

Author : Ronald A. Messier
ISBN : 9780292766655
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 69.72 MB
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Set along the Sahara's edge, Sijilmasa was an African El Dorado, a legendary city of gold. But unlike El Dorado, Sijilmasa was a real city, the pivot in the gold trade between ancient Ghana and the Mediterranean world. Following its emergence as an independent city-state controlling a monopoly on gold during its first 250 years, Sijilmasa was incorporated into empire—Almoravid, Almohad, and onward—leading to the "last civilized place" becoming the cradle of today's Moroccan dynasty, the Alaouites. Sijilmasa's millennium of greatness ebbed with periods of war, renewal, and abandonment. Today, its ruins lie adjacent to and under the modern town of Rissani, bypassed by time. The Moroccan-American Project at Sijilmasa draws on archaeology, historical texts, field reconnaissance, oral tradition, and legend to weave the story of how this fabled city mastered its fate. The authors' deep local knowledge and interpretation of the written and ecological record allow them to describe how people and place molded four distinct periods in the city's history. Messier and Miller compare models of Islamic cities to what they found on the ground to understand how Sijilmasa functioned as a city. Continuities and discontinuities between Sijilmasa and the contemporary landscape sharpen questions regarding the nature of human life on the rim of the desert. What, they ask, allows places like Sijilmasa to rise to greatness? What causes them to fall away and disappear into the desert sands?
Category: Social Science

Counting Islam

Author : Tarek Masoud
ISBN : 9781139991865
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 37.68 MB
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Why does Islam seem to dominate Egyptian politics, especially when the country's endemic poverty and deep economic inequality would seem to render it promising terrain for a politics of radical redistribution rather than one of religious conservativism? This book argues that the answer lies not in the political unsophistication of voters, the subordination of economic interests to spiritual ones, or the ineptitude of secular and leftist politicians, but in organizational and social factors that shape the opportunities of parties in authoritarian and democratizing systems to reach potential voters. Tracing the performance of Islamists and their rivals in Egyptian elections over the course of almost forty years, this book not only explains why Islamists win elections, but illuminates the possibilities for the emergence in Egypt of the kind of political pluralism that is at the heart of what we expect from democracy.
Category: Political Science

Empires Of Medieval West Africa

Author : David C. Conrad
ISBN : 9781604131642
Genre : Juvenile Nonfiction
File Size : 53.87 MB
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Explores empires of medieval west Africa.
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

The Berber Identity Movement And The Challenge To North African States

Author : Bruce Maddy-Weitzman
ISBN : 9780292745056
Genre : History
File Size : 62.76 MB
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Like many indigenous groups that have endured centuries of subordination, the Berber/Amazigh peoples of North Africa are demanding linguistic and cultural recognition and the redressing of injustices. Indeed, the movement seeks nothing less than a refashioning of the identity of North African states, a rewriting of their history, and a fundamental change in the basis of collective life. In so doing, it poses a challenge to the existing political and sociocultural orders in Morocco and Algeria, while serving as an important counterpoint to the oppositionist Islamist current. This is the first book-length study to analyze the rise of the modern ethnocultural Berber/Amazigh movement in North Africa and the Berber diaspora. Bruce Maddy-Weitzman begins by tracing North African history from the perspective of its indigenous Berber inhabitants and their interactions with more powerful societies, from Hellenic and Roman times, through a millennium of Islam, to the era of Western colonialism. He then concentrates on the marginalization and eventual reemergence of the Berber question in independent Algeria and Morocco, against a background of the growing crisis of regime legitimacy in each country. His investigation illuminates many issues, including the fashioning of official national narratives and policies aimed at subordinating Berbers in an Arab nationalist and Islamic-centered universe; the emergence of a counter-movement promoting an expansive Berber "imagining" that emphasizes the rights of minority groups and indigenous peoples; and the international aspects of modern Berberism.
Category: History

The Almoravids And The Meanings Of Jihad

Author : Ronald A. Messier
ISBN : 9780313385902
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 57.3 MB
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This book offers a scholarly, highly readable account of the 11th-12th century rulers of Morocco and Muslim Spain who offered a full range of meanings of jihad and challenged Ibn Khaldun's paradigm for the rise and fall of regimes. • Contains sketches of three principle characters (Ibn Yasin, Zaynab, and El Cid) as well as the Koranic inscription and the plan of the Sijilmasa mosque • Includes maps showing various places in North Africa and Southern Spain discussed in the text • Photographs of structures, archaeological sites, and coins that are mentioned in the narrative • A two-section bibliography contains both medieval Arabic sources and modern sources • The glossary defines place names, tribes, tribal confederations, titles, and technical Islamic terms
Category: Political Science

1492

Author : Felipe Fernández-Armesto
ISBN : 9781408809501
Genre : Civilization, Medieval
File Size : 20.93 MB
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A vivid new book from an established and bestselling historian.
Category: Civilization, Medieval

Lost Tribes And Promised Lands

Author : Ronald Sanders
ISBN : 1626542767
Genre : History
File Size : 36.24 MB
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THE COMPLETE ORIGINAL EDITION An utterly revelatory work. Unprecedented in scope, detail, and ambition. In "Lost Tribes and Promised Lands," celebrated historian and cultural critic Ronald Sanders offers a compelling and ideology-shattering history of racial prejudice and myth as shaped by political, religious, and economic forces from the 14th Century to the present day. Written with clear-eyed vigor, Sanders draws on a broad history of art, psychology, politics, and religion to inform his striking and soundly-reasoned assertions. "Lost Tribes and Promised Lands" nimbly zig-zags through space and time, doggedly chipping away at the myopic history of discovery and righteous conquest that has been reiterated for decades by the same ideological forces responsible for centuries of mythological prejudice and racial strife. Placing 14th Century Spanish intolerance (specifically anti-Semitism) as the origins of American racism toward African and Native Americans, Sanders elegantly weaves complex threads of colonial economics, religious exceptionalism, and xenophobia into a heady and often-infuriating thesis on the history of racism. Finally back in print in a complete and cost-accessible edition (when the book was out of print, demand for this important work was so intense that used copies sold for thousands of dollars). Find out why "Lost Tribes and Promised Lands" is a gripping and hegemony-exploding treatise on the history of race in the New World.
Category: History