THE HOHOKAM MILLENNIUM A SCHOOL FOR ADVANCED RESEARCH POPULAR ARCHAEOLOGY BOOK

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The Hohokam Millennium

Author : Suzanne K. Fish
ISBN : STANFORD:36105132213138
Genre : History
File Size : 41.58 MB
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For a thousand years they flourished in the arid lands now part of Arizona. They built extensive waterworks, ballcourts, and pyramids, made beautiful pottery and jewelry, and engaged in wide-ranging trade networks. Then, slowly, their civilization faded and trans-muted into something no longer Hohokam. Are today's Tohono O'odham their heirs or their conquerors? The mystery and the beauty of Hohokam civilization are the subjects of the essays in this volume. Written by archaeologists who have led the effort to excavate, record, and preserve the remnants of this ancient culture, the chapters illuminate the way the Hohokam organized their households and their communities, their sophisticated pottery and textiles, their irrigation system, the huge ballcourts and pyramids they built, and much more.
Category: History

Mimbres Lives And Landscapes

Author : Margaret Cecile Nelson
ISBN : 1934691240
Genre : History
File Size : 28.49 MB
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The well-illustrated essays in this book offer the latest archaeological research on the ancient Mimbres to explain what we know and what questions still remain about men and women's lives, their sustenance, the changing nature of leadership, and the possible meanings of the dramatic pottery designs.
Category: History

Ancient Puebloan Southwest

Author : John Kantner
ISBN : 0521788803
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 83.84 MB
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Ancient Puebloan Southwest traces the evolution of Puebloan society in the American Southwest from the emergence of the Chaco and Mimbres traditions in the AD 1000s through the early decades of contact with the Spanish in the sixteenth century. The 2004 book focuses on the social and political changes that shaped Puebloan people over the centuries, emphasizing how factors internal to society impacted on cultural evolution, even in the face of the challenging environment that characterizes the American Southwest. The underlying argument is that while the physical environment both provides opportunities and sets limitations to social and political change, even more important evolutionary forces are the tensions between co-operation and competition for status and leadership. Although relying primarily on archaeological data, the book also includes oral histories, historical accounts, and ethnographic records as it introduces readers to the deep history of the Puebloan Southwest.
Category: Social Science

Hohokam Pottery

Author : Jan Barstad
ISBN : 1877856959
Genre : Crafts & Hobbies
File Size : 57.79 MB
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Explains the simple but beautiful work of Hohokam potters and provides glimpses of a flourishing prehistoric culture in the Southwest. More than 20 images accompany concise and informative text for the non-specialist.
Category: Crafts & Hobbies

The Peopling Of Bandelier

Author : Robert P. Powers
ISBN : UOM:39015061187939
Genre : History
File Size : 71.29 MB
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Few visitors to the stunning Frijoles Canyon at Bandelier National Monument realize that its depths embrace but a small part of the archaeological richness of the vast Pajarito Plateau west of Santa Fe, New Mexico. In this beautifully illustrated book, archaeologists, historians, ecologists, and Pueblo contributors tell a deep and sweeping story of the region. Beginning with its first Paleo-Indian residents, through its Ancestral Pueblo florescence in the 14th and 15th centuries, to its role in the birth of American archaeology and the nuclear age, and concluding with its enduring centrality in the lives of Keresan and Tewa Indian peoples today, the plateau remains a place where the mysterious interplay of human culture and magnificent landscapes is written in its mesas and canyons. A must read for anyone interested in Southwestern archaeology and Native peoples.
Category: History

Grave Injustice

Author : Kathleen Sue Fine-Dare
ISBN : 0803206275
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 56.85 MB
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Grave Injustice is the powerful story of the ongoing struggle of Native Americans to repatriate the objects and remains of their ancestors that were appropriated, collected, manipulated, sold, and displayed by Europeans and Americans. Anthropologist Kathleen S. Fine-Dare focuses on the history and culture of both the impetus to collect and the movement to repatriate Native American remains. Using a straightforward historical framework and illuminating case studies, Fine-Dare first examines the changing cultural reasons for the appropriation of Native American remains. She then traces the succession of incidents, laws, and changing public and Native attitudes that have shaped the repatriation movement since the late nineteenth century. Her discussion and examples make clear that the issue is a complex one, that few clear-cut heroes or villains make up the history of the repatriation movement, and that little consensus about policy or solutions exists within or beyond academic and Native communities. The concluding chapters of this history take up the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), which Fine-Dare considers as a legal and cultural document. This highly controversial federal law was the result of lobbying by American Indian and Native Hawaiian peoples to obtain federal support for the right to bring back to their communities the human remains and associated objects that are housed in federally funded institutions all over the United States. Grave Injustice is a balanced introduction to a longstanding and complicated problem that continues to mobilize and threatens to divide Native Americans and the scholars who work with and write about them.
Category: Social Science

Exploring The Hohokam

Author : George J. Gumerman
ISBN : STANFORD:36105035231120
Genre : History
File Size : 39.51 MB
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Papers of a seminar held during Feb. 1988 at the Amerind Foundation, Dragoon, Ariz., and sponsored by the Bureau of Reclamation.
Category: History

The Oxford Handbook Of North American Archaeology

Author : Timothy Pauketat
ISBN : 9780190241094
Genre : History
File Size : 61.69 MB
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This volume explores 15,000 years of indigenous human history on the North American continent, drawing on the latest archaeological theories, time-honored methodologies, and rich datasets. From the Arctic south to the Mexican border and east to the Atlantic Ocean, all of the major cultural developments are covered in 53 chapters, with certain periods, places, and historical problems receiving special focus by the volume's authors. Questions like who first peopled the continent, what did it mean to have been a hunter-gatherer in the Great Basin versus the California coast, how significant were cultural exchanges between Native North Americans and Mesoamericans, and why do major historical changes seem to correspond to shifts in religion, politics, demography, and economy are brought into focus. The practice of archaeology itself is discussed as contributors wrestle with modern-day concerns with the implications of doing archaeology and its relevance for understanding ourselves today. In the end, the chapters in this book show us that the principal questions answered about human history through the archaeology of North America are central to any larger understanding of the relationships between people, cultural identities, landscapes, and the living of everyday life.
Category: History

The Oxford Handbook Of Zooarchaeology

Author : Umberto Albarella
ISBN : 9780199686476
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 57.3 MB
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Animals have played a fundamental role in shaping human history and the study of their remains from archaeological sites--zooarchaeology--has gradually been emerging as a powerful discipline and crucible for forging an understanding of our past. The Oxford Handbook of Zooarchaeology offers a cutting-edge compendium of zooarchaeology the world over that transcends environmental, economic, and social approaches, seeking instead to provide a holistic view of the roles played by animals in past human cultures. Incisive chapters written by leading scholars in the field incorporate case studies from across five continents, from Iceland to New Zealand and from Japan to Egypt and Ecuador, providing a sense of the dynamism of the discipline, the many approaches and methods adopted by different schools and traditions, and an idea of the huge range of interactions that have occurred between people and animals throughout the world and its history. Adaptations of human-animal relationships in environments as varied as the Arctic, temperate forests, deserts, the tropics, and the sea are discussed, while studies of hunter-gatherers, farmers, herders, fishermen, and even traders and urban dwellers highlight the importance that animals have had in all forms of human societies. With an introduction that clearly contextualizes the current practice of zooarchaeology in relation to both its history and the challenges and opportunities that can be expected for the future, and a methodological glossary illuminating the way in which zooarchaeologists approach the study of their material, this Handbook will be invaluable not only for specialists in the field, but for anybody who has an interest in our past and the role that animals have played in forging it.
Category: Social Science

Satellite Remote Sensing For Archaeology

Author : Sarah H. Parcak
ISBN : 9781134060450
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 68.37 MB
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This handbook is the first comprehensive overview of the field of satellite remote sensing for archaeology and how it can be applied to ongoing archaeological fieldwork projects across the globe. It provides a survey of the history and development of the field, connecting satellite remote sensing in archaeology to broader developments in remote sensing, archaeological method and theory, cultural resource management, and environmental studies. With a focus on practical uses of satellite remote sensing, Sarah H. Parcak evaluates satellite imagery types and remote sensing analysis techniques specific to the discovery, preservation, and management of archaeological sites. Case studies from Asia, Central America, and the Middle East are explored, including Xi’an, China; Angkor Wat, Cambodia and Egypt’s floodplains. In-field surveying techniques particular to satellite remote sensing are emphasized, providing strategies for recording ancient features on the ground observed from space. The book also discusses broader issues relating to archaeological remote sensing ethics, looting prevention, and archaeological site preservation. New sensing research is included and illustrated with the inclusion of over 160 satellite images of ancient sites. With a companion website (www.routledge.com/textbooks/9780415448789) with further resources and colour images, Satellite Remote Sensing for Archaeology will provide anyone interested in scientific applications to uncovering past archaeological landscapes a foundation for future research and study.
Category: Social Science