The Great Basin

Author : Catherine S. Fowler
ISBN : 1930618956
Genre : History
File Size : 48.28 MB
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This book is about a place, the Great Basin of western North America, and about the lifeways of Native American people who lived there during the past 13,000 years. The authors highlight the ingenious solutions people devised to sustain themselves in a difficult environment. The Great Basin is a semiarid and often harsh land, but one with life-giving oases. As the weather fluctuated from year to year, and the climate from decade to decade or even from one millennium to the next, the availability of water, plants, and animals also fluctuated. Only people who learned the land intimately and could read the many signs of its changing moods were successful. The evidence of their success is often subtle and difficult to interpret from the few and fragile remains left behind for archaeologists to discover. These ancient fragments of food and baskets, hats and hunting decoys, traps and rock art and the lifeways they reflect are the subject of this well-illustrated book.
Category: History

Interdisciplinary Instruction

Author : Karlyn E. Wood
ISBN : 9781478629542
Genre : Education
File Size : 23.71 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
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The fifth edition of this practical guide to interdisciplinary instruction focuses on the thinking and reasoning skills mandated by the Common Core State Standards and the content-learning standards required by an increasing number of states. The author provides an easy-to-follow, step-by-step guide to designing, creating, and implementing unit and lesson plans for all learners. Both pre-service and in-service elementary and middle-school teachers will find Wood’s approach to be comprehensive, with a strong theoretical foundation. Using Wiggins and McTighe’s backward design process, Wood offers specific protocols for creating unit and lesson plans at the elementary and middle-school levels. By emphasizing differential instruction, constructivist educational philosophy, application of skills in meaningful context, and the art of engaging student interest, he demonstrates how diverse student populations can benefit from the interdisciplinary approach. Prospective teachers will learn to create interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary plans that promote problem solving, creativity, and social interaction. Examples abound, with an appendix of sample unit plan designs filled with ideas for lessons and activities.
Category: Education

Where The Land Meets The Sea

Author : Tom D. Dillehay
ISBN : 9781477311493
Genre : History
File Size : 45.23 MB
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Huaca Prieta—one the world's best-known, yet least understood, early maritime mound sites—and other Preceramic sites on the north coast of Peru bear witness to the beginnings of civilization in the Americas. Across more than fourteen millennia of human occupation, the coalescence of maritime, agricultural, and pastoral economies in the north coast settlements set in motion long-term biological and cultural transformations that led to increased social complexity and food production, and later the emergence of preindustrial states and urbanism. These developments make Huaca Prieta a site of global importance in world archaeology. This landmark volume presents the findings of a major archaeological investigation carried out at Huaca Prieta, the nearby mound Paredones, and several Preceramic domestic sites in the lower Chicama Valley between 2006 and 2013 by an interdisciplinary team of more than fifty international specialists. The book's contributors report on and analyze the extensive material records from the sites, including data on the architecture and spatial patterns; floral, faunal, and lithic remains; textiles; basketry; and more. Using this rich data, they build new models of the social, economic, and ontological practices of these early peoples, who appear to have favored cooperation and living in harmony with the environment over the accumulation of power and the development of ruling elites. This discovery adds a crucial new dimension to our understanding of emergent social complexity, cosmology, and religion in the Neolithic period.
Category: History

The Great Basin

Author : Donald Grayson
ISBN : 9780520267473
Genre : Nature
File Size : 64.7 MB
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"The Great Basin, centering on Nevada and including substantial parts of California, Oregon, and Utah, gets its name from the fact that none of its rivers or streams flow to the sea. This book synthesizes the past 25,000 years of the natural history of this vast region. It explores the extinct animals that lived in the Great Basin during the Ice Age and recounts the rise and fall of the massive Ice Age lakes that existed here. It explains why trees once grew 13' beneath what is now the surface of Lake Tahoe, explores the nearly two dozen Great Basin mountain ranges that once held substantial glaciers, and tells the remarkable story of how pinyon pine came to cover some 17,000,000 acres of the Great Basin in the relatively recent past.These discussions culminate with the impressive history of the prehistoric people of the Great Basin, a history that shows how human societies dealt with nearly 13,000 years of climate change on this often-challenging landscape"--Provided by publisher.
Category: Nature

Traces Of Fremont

Author :
ISBN : UOM:39076002879158
Genre : Art
File Size : 77.32 MB
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Fremont is a culture (ca. 300-1300 A.D.) first defined by archaeologist Noel Morss in 1928 based on characteristics unique to the area. Intially thought to be a simple socio-political system, recent reassessments of the Fremont assume a more complex society. This volume places Fremont rock art studies in this contemporary context. Author Steven Simms offers an innovative model of Fremont society, politics, and world-view using the principles of analogy and current archaeological evidence. Simms takes readers on a trip back in time by describing what a typical Fremont "hamlet" or residential area might have looked like a thousand years ago, including the inhabitants' daily activities. Francois Gohier's captivating photographs of Fremont art and artifacts offer an engaging complement to Simms's text, aiding us in our understanding of the lives of these ancient people. Simms's book is excellent! I really like his take on Fremont, I like the narrative descriptions of various Fremont settlements, and I like his treatment of rock art--balanced and scholarly without losing the interest and excitement of that astonishing Fremont medium. --Stephen H. Lekson, professor of anthropology and curator, University of Colorado Museum of Natural History
Category: Art

Archaeology In America An Encyclopedia 4 Volumes

Author : Linda S. Cordell
ISBN : 9780313021893
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 59.74 MB
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The greatness of America is right under our feet. The American past—the people, battles, industry and homes—can be found not only in libraries and museums, but also in hundreds of archaeological sites that scientists investigate with great care. These sites are not in distant lands, accessible only by research scientists, but nearby—almost every locale possesses a parcel of land worthy of archaeological exploration. Archaeology in America is the first resource that provides students, researchers, and anyone interested in their local history with a survey of the most important archaeological discoveries in North America. Leading scholars, most with an intimate knowledge of the area, have written in-depth essays on over 300 of the most important archaeological sites that explain the importance of the site, the history of the people who left the artifacts, and the nature of the ongoing research. Archaeology in America divides it coverage into 8 regions: the Arctic and Subarctic, the Great Basin and Plateau, the Great Plains and Rocky Mountains, the Midwest, the Northeast, the Southeast, the Southwest, and the West Coast. Each entry provides readers with an accessible overview of the archaeological site as well as books and articles for further research.
Category: Social Science

Ancient Puebloan Southwest

Author : John Kantner
ISBN : 0521788803
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 72.93 MB
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Ancient Puebloan Southwest traces the evolution of Puebloan society in the American Southwest from the emergence of the Chaco and Mimbres traditions in the AD 1000s through the early decades of contact with the Spanish in the sixteenth century. The 2004 book focuses on the social and political changes that shaped Puebloan people over the centuries, emphasizing how factors internal to society impacted on cultural evolution, even in the face of the challenging environment that characterizes the American Southwest. The underlying argument is that while the physical environment both provides opportunities and sets limitations to social and political change, even more important evolutionary forces are the tensions between co-operation and competition for status and leadership. Although relying primarily on archaeological data, the book also includes oral histories, historical accounts, and ethnographic records as it introduces readers to the deep history of the Puebloan Southwest.
Category: Social Science

Anasazi America

Author : David E. Stuart
ISBN : 9780826354792
Genre : History
File Size : 88.70 MB
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At the height of their power in the late eleventh century, the Chaco Anasazi dominated a territory in the American Southwest larger than any European principality of the time. Developed over the course of centuries and thriving for over two hundred years, the Chacoans’ society collapsed dramatically in the twelfth century in a mere forty years. David E. Stuart incorporates extensive new research findings through groundbreaking archaeology to explore the rise and fall of the Chaco Anasazi and how it parallels patterns throughout modern societies in this new edition. Adding new research findings on caloric flows in prehistoric times and investigating the evolutionary dynamics induced by these forces as well as exploring the consequences of an increasingly detached central Chacoan decision-making structure, Stuart argues that Chaco’s failure was a failure to adapt to the consequences of rapid growth—including problems with the misuse of farmland, malnutrition, loss of community, and inability to deal with climatic catastrophe. Have modern societies learned from the experience and fate of the Chaco Anasazi, or are we risking a similar cultural collapse?
Category: History

The Oxford Handbook Of Wetland Archaeology

Author : Francesco Menotti
ISBN : 9780199573493
Genre : Science
File Size : 86.36 MB
Format : PDF
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The Oxford Handbook of Wetland Archaeology is the most comprehensive survey of world wetland archaeology ever published and sets out and covers the key issues and debates in the theory and practice of wetland archaeology, which has played a crucial role in studies of our past. Due to the high quantity of well-preserved organic materials found in humid environments, the study of wetlands has allowed archaeologists to reconstruct people's everyday lives ingreat detail. Through concise essays written by over fifty of the world's leading scholars in the field, it describes the scientific and archaeological principles, methodologies, and spectacular results of past and present archaeological investigations of wetland environments.
Category: Science