THE CREATION OF INEQUALITY HOW OUR PREHISTORIC ANCESTORS SET THE STAGE FOR MONARCHY SLAVERY AND EMPIRE

Download The Creation Of Inequality How Our Prehistoric Ancestors Set The Stage For Monarchy Slavery And Empire ebook PDF or Read Online books in PDF, EPUB, and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to THE CREATION OF INEQUALITY HOW OUR PREHISTORIC ANCESTORS SET THE STAGE FOR MONARCHY SLAVERY AND EMPIRE book pdf for free now.

The Creation Of Inequality

Author : Kent Flannery
ISBN : 9780674064973
Genre : History
File Size : 77.71 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 730
Read : 1219

Flannery and Marcus demonstrate that the rise of inequality was not simply the result of population increase, food surplus, or the accumulation of valuables but resulted from conscious manipulation of the unique social logic that lies at the core of every human group. Reversing the social logic can reverse inequality, they argue, without violence.
Category: History

The Creation Of Inequality

Author : Kent Flannery
ISBN : 0674064690
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 78.94 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 909
Read : 1177

Flannery and Marcus demonstrate that the rise of inequality was not simply the result of population increase, food surplus, or the accumulation of valuables but resulted from conscious manipulation of the unique social logic that lies at the core of every human group. Reversing the social logic can reverse inequality, they argue, without violence.
Category: Social Science

How Chiefs Come To Power

Author : Timothy K. Earle
ISBN : 0804728569
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 45.15 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 359
Read : 768

This book is basically about power-how people came to acquire it and the implications that contrasting paths to power had for the development of societies. Earle argues that chiefdoms, being a regional polity with governance over a population of a few thousand to tens of thousands of people, and with some social stratification, possessed the same fundamental dynamics as those of states, and that the origin of states is to be understood in the emergence and development of chiefdoms. His arguments are developed by three case studies-Denmark during the Neolithic and early Bronze Age (2300-1300) BC, the high Andes of Peru from the early chiefdoms through the Inka conquest (AD 500-1534), and Hawai'i from early settlement to its incorporation in the world economy (AD 800-1824). After summarizing the cultural history of the three societies over a thousand years, he considers the sources of chiefly power-the economy, military power and ideology-and how these sources were linked together.
Category: Social Science

Foundations Of Social Inequality

Author : T. Douglas Price
ISBN : 9781489912893
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 90.46 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 841
Read : 421

In this authoritative volume, leading researchers offer diverse theoretical perspectives and a wide-range of information on the beginnings and nature of social inequality in past human societies. Their illuminating work investigates the role of status differentiation in traditional archaeological debates and major societal transitions. This volume features numerous case studies from the Old and New World spanning foraging societies to agricultural groups and complex states. Diachronic in view and archaeological in focus, this book will be of significant interest to archaeologists, anthropologists, and students.
Category: Social Science

War And Peace And War

Author : Peter Turchin
ISBN : 1101126914
Genre : History
File Size : 63.82 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 403
Read : 524

Like Jared Diamond in Guns, Germs, and Steel, Peter Turchin in War and Peace and War uses his expertise in evolutionary biology to make a highly original argument about the rise and fall of empires. Turchin argues that the key to the formation of an empire is a society’s capacity for collective action. He demonstrates that high levels of cooperation are found where people have to band together to fight off a common enemy, and that this kind of cooperation led to the formation of the Roman and Russian empires, and the United States. But as empires grow, the rich get richer and the poor get poorer, conflict replaces cooperation, and dissolution inevitably follows. Eloquently argued and rich with historical examples, War and Peace and War offers a bold new theory about the course of world history.
Category: History

Understanding Early Civilizations

Author : Bruce G. Trigger
ISBN : 0521822459
Genre : History
File Size : 32.86 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 391
Read : 849

This book offers the first detailed comparative study of the seven best-documented early civilizations: ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, Shang China, the Aztecs and adjacent peoples in the Valley of Mexico, the Classic Maya, the Inka, and the Yoruba. Unlike previous studies, equal attention is paid to similarities and differences in their sociopolitical organization, economic systems, religion, and culture. Many of this study's findings are surprising and provocative. Agricultural systems, technologies, and economic behaviour turn out to have been far more diverse than was expected. These findings and many others challenge not only current understandings of early civilizations but also the theoretical foundations of modern archaeology and anthropology. The key to understanding early civilizations lies not in their historical connections but in what they can tell us about similarities and differences in human behaviour.
Category: History

The Comparative Archaeology Of Complex Societies

Author : Michael E. Smith
ISBN : 9781139502030
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 25.8 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 430
Read : 855

Part of a resurgence in the comparative study of ancient societies, this book presents a variety of methods and approaches to comparative analysis through the examination of wide-ranging case studies. Each chapter is a comparative study, and the diverse topics and regions covered in the book contribute to the growing understanding of variation and change in ancient complex societies. The authors explore themes ranging from urbanization and settlement patterns, to the political strategies of kings and chiefs, to the economic choices of individuals and households. The case studies cover an array of geographical settings, from the Andes to Southeast Asia. The authors are leading archaeologists whose research on early empires, states, and chiefdoms is at the cutting edge of scientific archaeology.
Category: Social Science

Captives

Author : Catherine M. Cameron
ISBN : 9780803295766
Genre : SOCIAL SCIENCE
File Size : 20.83 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 362
Read : 929

"In Captives: How Stolen People Changed the World archaeologist Catherine M. Cameron provides an eye-opening comparative study of the profound impact that captives of warfare and raiding have had on small-scale societies through time. Cameron provides a new point of orientation for archaeologists, anthropologists, historians, and other scholars by illuminating the impact that captive-taking and enslavement have had on cultural change, with important implications for understanding the past. Focusing primarily on indigenous societies in the Americas while extending the comparative reach to include Europe, Africa, and Island Southeast Asia, Cameron draws on ethnographic, ethnohistoric, historic, and archaeological data to examine the roles that captives played in small-scale societies. In such societies, captives represented an almost universal social category consisting predominantly of women and children and constituting 10 to 50 percent of the population in a given society. Cameron demonstrates how captives brought with them new technologies, design styles, foodways, religious practices, and more, all of which changed the captor culture. This book provides a framework that will enable archaeologists to understand the scale and nature of cultural transmission by captivesand it will also interest anthropologists, historians, and other scholars who study captive-taking and slavery. Cameron's exploration of the peculiar amnesia that surrounds memories of captive-taking and enslavement around the world also establishes a connection with unmistakable contemporary relevance"--
Category: SOCIAL SCIENCE

Ten Thousand Years Of Inequality

Author : Timothy A. Kohler
ISBN : 9780816537747
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 64.71 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 293
Read : 654

"Field-defining research that will set the standard for understanding inequality in archaeological contexts"--Provided by publisher.
Category: Social Science

Out Of Eden

Author : David P. Barash
ISBN : 9780190275501
Genre : Human behavior
File Size : 48.53 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 821
Read : 177

In this changing world of what is deemed socially and politically "correct," polygamy is perhaps the last great taboo. Over the course of the last thousand years, monogamy - at least in name - has been the default setting for coupledom and procreation. And yet, throughout history, there havebeen inklings that "one-man, one-woman" may not be the most natural state-of-being for humans. The recent Ashley Madison "cheaters website" hacking, coupled with the high divorce rate of the last half-century, provide more than enough evidence to convince even a hopeless romantic that monogamy, andthe institution of marriage which props it up, is doomed to be a bygone remnant of a more socially conservative past.Esteemed writer and evolutionary biologist David P. Barash tackles this uncomfortable finding: that humans are actually biologically and anthropologically more inclined toward polygamy. With years of research in the field to back up this argument, Barash presents hundreds of anecdotes from bothevolutionary biology and human history that guide the reader through the societal impacts of monogamy and polygamy - some expected (sexual behavior) and others unexpected (the most successful models of parenting). Despite this natural inclination of humanity, Barash is reassuring throughout thisfascinating read in his resolution that "biology is not destiny."
Category: Human behavior