THE ART OF SHAPING THE METROPOLIS

Download The Art Of Shaping The Metropolis ebook PDF or Read Online books in PDF, EPUB, and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to THE ART OF SHAPING THE METROPOLIS book pdf for free now.

The Art Of Shaping The Metropolis

Author : Pedro Ortiz
ISBN : 9780071817974
Genre : Architecture
File Size : 62.64 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 459
Read : 801

A proven approach for addressing explosive metropolitan growth in an integrated and holistic manner “The book provides a basis for the contemplation of the old network paradigm of the megalopolis into the informational meshwork of the mega- or metacity of the future. The handbook’s review of the networked past is invaluable, while its projection of these networks into future plans raises very many important questions for planners, urban designers, architects, and concerned citizens alike.” –From the Foreword by Professor Grahame Shane, Columbia University For the first time, half the global population is living in urban areas—and that number is growing exponentially. Written by noted urban planner Pedro Ortiz, who served as director of the groundbreaking Madrid Metropolitan-Regional Plan, The Art of Shaping the Metropolis presents an innovative, agile solution for managing urban growth that enhances economic activity, environmental stability, and quality of life. Based on the findings from Madrid and other cities, this timely guide offers a methodical system for addressing the crucial issues facing governments, professionals, the private and public sectors, developers, stakeholders, and inhabitants of twenty-first-century metropolises. The book details new rubrics to identify the process of growth and its evolution, new tools to monitor and gauge them, and new methods to synthesize them into a professional praxis that will be sustainable for the long term. Ortiz demonstrates how metropolises can be organized for a future that preserves the historic nucleus of the city and the environment, while providing for the necessary sustainable expansion of transportation, housing, and social and productive facilities. Coverage includes: The dialogues of the metropolis The challenge The inheritance Balanced urban development—fabric and form The chess on a tripod (CiTi) method to build the model Madrid as testing ground Practical considerations in implementing a metropolitan plan Translating the model elsewhere
Category: Architecture

The Connected City

Author : Zachary P. Neal
ISBN : 9781136236662
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 35.60 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 994
Read : 771

The Connected City explores how thinking about networks helps make sense of modern cities: what they are, how they work, and where they are headed. Cities and urban life can be examined as networks, and these urban networks can be examined at many different levels. The book focuses on three levels of urban networks: micro, meso, and macro. These levels build upon one another, and require distinctive analytical approaches that make it possible to consider different types of questions. At one extreme, micro-urban networks focus on the networks that exist within cities, like the social relationships among neighbors that generate a sense of community and belonging. At the opposite extreme, macro-urban networks focus on networks between cities, like the web of nonstop airline flights that make face-to-face business meetings possible. This book contains three major sections organized by the level of analysis and scale of network. Throughout these sections, when a new methodological concept is introduced, a separate ‘method note’ provides a brief and accessible introduction to the practical issues of using networks in research. What makes this book unique is that it synthesizes the insights and tools of the multiple scales of urban networks, and integrates the theory and method of network analysis.
Category: Social Science

Shaping London

Author : Terry Farrell
ISBN : UCSD:31822036371219
Genre : Architecture
File Size : 79.48 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 339
Read : 1228

Sir Terry Farrell takes us on a journey around London, beyond the contribution of individual buildings, to the city - creating a larger, more exciting frame in which to view the city.
Category: Architecture

Nature S Metropolis Chicago And The Great West

Author : William Cronon
ISBN : 9780393072457
Genre : History
File Size : 24.78 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 208
Read : 416

A Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and Winner of the Bancroft Prize. "No one has written a better book about a city…Nature's Metropolis is elegant testimony to the proposition that economic, urban, environmental, and business history can be as graceful, powerful, and fascinating as a novel." —Kenneth T. Jackson, Boston Globe In this groundbreaking work, William Cronon gives us an environmental perspective on the history of nineteenth-century America. By exploring the ecological and economic changes that made Chicago America's most dynamic city and the Great West its hinterland, Mr. Cronon opens a new window onto our national past. This is the story of city and country becoming ever more tightly bound in a system so powerful that it reshaped the American landscape and transformed American culture. The world that emerged is our own. Winner of the Chicago Tribune Heartland Prize
Category: History

Repairing The American Metropolis

Author : Douglas S. Kelbaugh
ISBN : 9780295997513
Genre : Architecture
File Size : 21.62 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 991
Read : 170

Repairing the American Metropolis is based on Douglas Kelbaugh�s Common Place: Toward Neighborhood and Regional Design, first published in 1997. It is more timely and significant than ever, with new text, charts, and images on architecture, sprawl, and New Urbanism, a movement that he helped pioneer. Theory and policies have been revised, refined, updated, and developed as compelling ways to plan and design the built environment. This is an indispensable book for architects, urban designers and planners, landscape architects, architecture and urban planning students and scholars, government officials, developers, environmentalists, and citizens interested in understanding and shaping the American metropolis.
Category: Architecture

Makeshift Metropolis

Author : Witold Rybczynski
ISBN : 1416561293
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 72.30 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 834
Read : 1058

In this new work, prizewinning author, professor, and Slate architecture critic Witold Rybczynski returns to the territory he knows best: writing about the way people live, just as he did in the acclaimed bestsellers Home and A Clearing in the Distance. In Makeshift Metropolis, Rybczynski has drawn upon a lifetime of observing cities to craft a concise and insightful book that is at once an intellectual history and a masterful critique. Makeshift Metropolis describes how current ideas about urban planning evolved from the movements that defined the twentieth century, such as City Beautiful, the Garden City, and the seminal ideas of Frank Lloyd Wright and Jane Jacobs. If the twentieth century was the age of planning, we now find ourselves in the age of the market, Rybczynski argues, where entrepreneurial developers are shaping the twenty-first-century city with mixed-use developments, downtown living, heterogeneity, density, and liveliness. He introduces readers to projects like Brooklyn Bridge Park, the Yards in Washington, D.C., and, further afield, to the new city of Modi’in, Israel—sites that, in this age of resource scarcity, economic turmoil, and changing human demands, challenge our notion of the city. Erudite and immensely engaging, Makeshift Metropolis is an affirmation of Rybczynski’s role as one of our most original thinkers on the way we live today.
Category: Social Science

The World In 2050

Author : Laurence C. Smith
ISBN : 9781101443521
Genre : Science
File Size : 47.63 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 504
Read : 1217

A vivid forecast of our planet in the year 2050 by a rising star in geoscience, distilling cutting-edge research into four global forces: demographic trends, natural resource demand, climate change, and globalization. The world's population is exploding, wild species are vanishing, our environment is degrading, and the costs of resources from oil to water are going nowhere but up. So what kind of world are we leaving for our children and grandchildren? Geoscientist and Guggenheim fellow Laurence Smith draws on the latest global modeling research to construct a sweeping thought experiment on what our world will be like in 2050. The result is both good news and bad: Eight nations of the Arctic Rim (including the United States) will become increasingly prosperous, powerful, and politically stable, while those closer to the equator will face water shortages, aging populations, and crowded megacities sapped by the rising costs of energy and coastal flooding. The World in 2050 combines the lessons of geography and history with state-of-the-art model projections and analytical data-everything from climate dynamics and resource stocks to age distributions and economic growth projections. But Smith offers more than a compendium of statistics and studies- he spent fifteen months traveling the Arctic Rim, collecting stories and insights that resonate throughout the book. It is an approach much like Jared Diamond took in Guns, Germs, and Steel and Collapse, a work of geoscientific investigation rich in the appreciation of human diversity. Packed with stunning photographs, original maps, and informative tables, this is the most authoritative, balanced, and compelling account available of the world of challenges and opportunities that we will leave for our children.
Category: Science

Labyrinth

Author : Louise Coysh
ISBN : 9781908970169
Genre : Art
File Size : 84.52 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 304
Read : 227

London's underground railways are an expression of the spread and diversity of the most international of capitals. Indeed, for many Londoners, the subterranean network is the very essence of the city, its arteries carrying the pulse of urban life from the heart of the metropolis out to its farthest extremities and beyond. How to capture that breadth in one work of art? How to celebrate a single system while also reflecting the millions of lives that it transports every day? That was the challenge facing Turner Prize-winning artist Mark Wallinger. His response was to create a vast, permanent work of public art across the entire network, layered with rich cultural and historical references. In each of the Underground's 270 stations, he placed a uniquely designed labyrinth, an ancient symbol representing spiritual and imaginative voyages akin to the countless circuitous journeys made on the Tube. Designed by the award-winning studio Rose, Labyrinth: A Journey Through London's Underground by Mark Wallinger is a compelling record of this extraordinary project. But more than that, it is also a vivid celebration of the London Underground and of London itself. Striking photographs of all the labyrinths in situ reveal the diverse face and fabric of the network and its users, while fascinating 'I-never-knew-that' facts about each station and their surrounds bring surprising perspectives to the daily commute. Transport historian Christian Wolmar tells the story of the emergence and development of London's subterranean rail network and the important role it has played in shaping the metropolis and those who live in it. Novelist Will Self responds to Wallinger's piece with a personal reflection that takes us into the depths of memory and through the disorientating effects of urban life; while writer and academic Marina Warner, in conversation with the artist, explores the historical and mythological significance of the labyrinth and places the project in the context of Wallinger's practice. Much more than a document of the creation of a work of art, this book is also a unique portrait of a system that keeps London going, the very lifeblood upon which it depends and thrives.
Category: Art

Magnetic Los Angeles

Author : Greg Hise
ISBN : 0801862558
Genre : Architecture
File Size : 81.65 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 650
Read : 917

"Published in cooperation with the Center for American Places, Harrisonburg, Virginia"--P. [iii].
Category: Architecture

Science And The City

Author : Laurie Winkless
ISBN : 9781472913227
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 62.79 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 548
Read : 408

Cities are a big deal. More people now live in them than don't, and with a growing world population, the urban jungle is only going to get busier in the coming decades. But how often do we stop to think about what makes our cities work? Cities are built using some of the most creative and revolutionary science and engineering ideas – from steel structures that scrape the sky to glass cables that help us communicate at the speed of light – but most of us are too busy to notice. Science and the City is your guidebook to that hidden world, helping you to uncover some of the remarkable technologies that keep the world's great metropolises moving. Laurie Winkless takes us around cities in six continents to find out how they're dealing with the challenges of feeding, housing, powering and connecting more people than ever before. In this book, you'll meet urban pioneers from history, along with today's experts in everything from roads to time, and you will uncover the vital role science has played in shaping the city around you. But more than that, by exploring cutting-edge research from labs across the world, you'll build your own vision of the megacity of tomorrow, based on science fact rather than science fiction. Science and the City is the perfect read for anyone curious about the world they live in.
Category: Political Science