THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF REGIONAL INTERACTION RELIGION WARFARE AND EXCHANGE ACROSS THE AMERICAN SOUTHWEST AND BEYOND PROCEEDINGS OF THE SOUTHWEST SYMPOSIUM

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The Archaeology Of Regional Interaction

Author : Michelle Hegmon
ISBN : 9780870819049
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 53.60 MB
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A collection of scholarly essays examines why and how styles, materials, conflicts, and religious ideas spread across the prehistoric Southwest.
Category: Social Science

Hopi Oral Tradition And The Archaeology Of Identity

Author : Wesley Bernardini
ISBN : 9780816536412
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 51.29 MB
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As contemporary Native Americans assert the legacy of their ancestors, there is increasing debate among archaeologists over the methods and theories used to reconstruct prehistoric identity and the movement of social groups. This is especially problematic with respect to the emergence of southwestern tribes, which involved shifting populations and identities over the course of more than a thousand years. Wesley Bernardini now draws on an unconventional source, Hopi traditional knowledge, to show how hypotheses that are developed from oral tradition can stimulate new and productive ways to think about the archaeological record. Focusing on insights that oral tradition has to offer about general processes of prehistoric migration and identity formation, he describes how each Hopi clan acquired its particular identity from the experiences it accumulated on its unique migration pathway. This pattern of “serial migration” by small social groups often saw the formation of villages by clans that briefly came together and then moved off again independently, producing considerable social diversity both within and among villages. Using Anderson Mesa and Homol’ovi as case studies, Bernardini presents architectural and demographic data suggesting that the fourteenth century occupation of these regions was characterized by population flux and diversity consistent with the serial migration model. He offers an analysis of rock art motifs—focusing on those used as clan symbols—to evaluate the diversity of group identities, then presents a compositional analysis of Jeddito Yellow Ware pottery to evaluate the diversity of these groups’ eventual migration destinations. Evidence supporting serial migration greatly complicates existing notions of links between ancient and modern social groups, with important implications for the implementation of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act. Bernardini’s work clearly demonstrates that studies of cultural affiliation must take into account the fluid nature of population movements and identity in the prehistoric landscape. It takes a decisive step toward better understanding the major demographic change that occurred on the Colorado Plateau from 1275 to 1400 and presents a strategy for improving the reconstruction of cultural identity in the past.
Category: Social Science

Beyond Germs

Author : Catherine M. Cameron
ISBN : 9780816500246
Genre : History
File Size : 43.37 MB
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"Beyond Germs: Native Depopulation in North America" challenges the hypothesis that the massive depopulation of the New World was primarily caused by diseases brought by Europeans, which scholars used for decades to explain the decimation of the indigenous peoples of North America. Contributors expertly argue that blaming germs downplays the active role of Europeans in inciting wars, destroying livelihoods, and erasing identities.
Category: History

The Bioarchaeology Of Social Control

Author : Ryan P. Harrod
ISBN : 9783319595160
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 64.40 MB
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Taking a bioarchaeological approach, this book examines the Ancestral Pueblo culture living in the Four Corners region of the United States during the late Pueblo I through the end of the Pueblo III period (AD 850-1300). During this time, a vast system of pueblo villages spread throughout the region creating what has been called the Chaco Phenomenon, named after the large great houses in Chaco Canyon that are thought to have been centers of control. Through a bioarchaeological analysis of the human skeletal remains, this volume provides evidence that key individuals within the hierarchical social structure used a variety of methods of social control, including structural violence, to maintain their power over the interconnected communities.
Category: Social Science

The U S Mexico Transborder Region

Author : Carlos G. Vélez-Ibáñez
ISBN : 9780816535156
Genre : History
File Size : 20.76 MB
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The U.S.-Mexico Transborder Region presents advanced anthropological theorizing of culture in an important regional setting. Not a static entity, the transborder region is peopled by ever-changing groups who face the challenges of social inequality: political enforcement of privilege, economic subordination of indigenous communities, and organized resistance to domination. Contributors emphasize the dynamic “transborder” quality—conflicts, resistance, slanting, displacements, and persistence—in order to combine a critical perspective on unequal power relations with a questioning perspective on claims to bounded simplicity and perfection. At a time when understanding the U.S.-Mexico border is more important than ever, this volume offers a critical anthropological and historical approach to working in transborder regions.
Category: History

Living And Leaving

Author : Donna M. Glowacki
ISBN : 9780816502486
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 47.29 MB
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The Mesa Verde migrations in the thirteenth century were an integral part of a transformative period that forever changed the course of Pueblo history. For more than seven hundred years, Pueblo people lived in the Northern San Juan region of the U.S. Southwest. Yet by the end of the 1200s, tens of thousands of Pueblo people had left the region. Understanding how it happened and where they went are enduring questions central to Southwestern archaeology. Much of the focus on this topic has been directed at understanding the role of climate change, drought, violence, and population pressure. The role of social factors, particularly religious change and sociopolitical organization, are less well understood. Bringing together multiple lines of evidence, including settlement patterns, pottery exchange networks, and changes in ceremonial and civic architecture, this book takes a historical perspective that naturally forefronts the social factors underlying the depopulation of Mesa Verde. Author Donna M. Glowacki shows how “living and leaving” were experienced across the region and what role differing stressors and enablers had in causing emigration. The author’s analysis explains how different histories and contingencies—which were shaped by deeply rooted eastern and western identities, a broad-reaching Aztec-Chaco ideology, and the McElmo Intensification—converged, prompting everyone to leave the region. This book will be of interest to southwestern specialists and anyone interested in societal collapse, transformation, and resilience.
Category: Social Science

Contemporary Archaeologies Of The Southwest

Author : William Walker
ISBN : 9781457111563
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 28.46 MB
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Organized by the theme of place and place-making in the Southwest, Contemporary Archaeologies of the Southwest emphasizes the method and theory for the study of radical changes in religion, settlement patterns, and material culture associated with population migration, colonialism, and climate change during the last 1,000 years. Chapters address place-making in Chaco Canyon, recent trends in landscape archaeology, the formation of identities, landscape boundaries, and the movement associated with these aspects of place-making. They address how interaction of peoples with objects brings landscapes to life. Representing a diverse cross section of Southwestern archaeologists, the authors of this volume push the boundaries of archaeological method and theory, building a strong foundation for future Southwest studies. This book will be of interest to professional and academic archaeologists, as well as students working in the American Southwest.
Category: Social Science

These Thin Partitions

Author : Joshua Englehardt
ISBN : 9781607325420
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 84.95 MB
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These “Thin Partitions” explores the intellectual and methodological differences that separate two of the four subdisciplines within the field of anthropology: archaeology and cultural anthropology. Contributors examine the theoretical underpinnings of this separation and explore what can be gained by joining them, both in university departments and in field research. In case studies highlighting the benefits of interdisciplinary collaboration, contributors argue that anthropologists and archaeologists are simply not “speaking the same language” and that the division between fields undermines the field of anthropology as a whole. Scholars must bridge this gap and find ways to engage in interdisciplinary collaboration to promote the health of the anthropological discipline. By sharing data, methods, and ideas, archaeology and cultural anthropology can not only engage in more productive debates but also make research accessible to those outside academia. These “Thin Partitions” gets to the heart of a well-known problem in the field of anthropology and contributes to the ongoing debate by providing concrete examples of how interdisciplinary collaboration can enhance the outcomes of anthropological research. Contributors: Fredrik Fahlander, Lilia Fernández Souza, Kent Fowler, Donna Goldstein, Joseph R. Hellweg, Derek Johnson, Ashley Kistler, Vincent M. LaMotta, John Monaghan, William A. Parkinson, Paul Shankman, David Small
Category: Social Science

Pottery And Practice

Author : Suzanne L. Eckert
ISBN : 0826338348
Genre : Art
File Size : 79.10 MB
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Pottery and Practiceexamines decorated pottery and its production in prehispanic New Mexico's Lower Rio Puerco area through the lens of practice theory. Arguing that social relations can be interpreted from the mundane practice of everyday life, Eckert shows how the relationship between ethnicity, migration, and ritual practice combined to create a complexly patterned material culture among residents of two fourteenth-century Pueblo villages. Focusing specifically on the social boundaries that existed between immigrant and local Pueblo groups, she argues that tensions between these groups were articulated in potters' decisions of how to make and decorate their vessels. After providing the archaeological and temporal context of her study, Eckert defines communities of practice and communities of identity within Pottery Mound and Hummingbird Pueblo, and then examines these communities in light of migration and ritual practice.
Category: Art

Destruction

Author : Jan Driessen
ISBN : 9782875581242
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 63.20 MB
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Destruction remains a relatively unexplored and badly understood topic in archaeology and history. The term itself refers to some form and measurable degree of damage inflicted to an object, a system or a being, usually exceeding the stage during which repair is still possible but most often it is examined for its impact with destructive events interpreted in terms of a punctuated equilibrium, extraordinary features that represent the end of an archaeological culture or historical phase and the beginning of a new one. The three-day international workshop of which this volume presents the proceedings took place at Louvain-la-Neuve in Belgium, from November 24 to 26, 2011 and was organized by CEMA – Centre d'Étude des Mondes Antiques – one of the research centres within INCAL – Institut de Civilisations, Arts et Lettres. Our aim with organising this gathering was to seriously engage with destruction as a phenomenon and how it is perceived by archaeologists, historians and philologists of the ancient world. The volume is similarly structured to the workshop which it reflects, with first a series of more theoretical papers and then following a chronological and geographical order.
Category: Social Science