SUBURBAN WARRIORS

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Suburban Warriors

Author : Lisa McGirr
ISBN : 0691096112
Genre : History
File Size : 56.80 MB
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A study of American conservatism revisits the early and mid-1960s to trace the roots of the conservative revival that eventually changed the American political landscape.
Category: History

Suburban Warriors The Origins Of The New American Right

Author : Lisa McGirr
ISBN : 9781400843633
Genre : History
File Size : 44.74 MB
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In the early 1960s, American conservatives seemed to have fallen on hard times. McCarthyism was on the run, and movements on the political left were grabbing headlines. The media lampooned John Birchers's accusations that Dwight Eisenhower was a communist puppet. Mainstream America snickered at warnings by California Congressman James B. Utt that "barefooted Africans" were training in Georgia to help the United Nations take over the country. Yet, in Utt's home district of Orange County, thousands of middle-class suburbanites proceeded to organize a powerful conservative movement that would land Ronald Reagan in the White House and redefine the spectrum of acceptable politics into the next century. Suburban Warriors introduces us to these people: women hosting coffee klatches for Barry Goldwater in their tract houses; members of anticommunist reading groups organizing against sex education; pro-life Democrats gradually drawn into conservative circles; and new arrivals finding work in defense companies and a sense of community in Orange County's mushrooming evangelical churches. We learn what motivated them and how they interpreted their political activity. Lisa McGirr shows that their movement was not one of marginal people suffering from status anxiety, but rather one formed by successful entrepreneurial types with modern lifestyles and bright futures. She describes how these suburban pioneers created new political and social philosophies anchored in a fusion of Christian fundamentalism, xenophobic nationalism, and western libertarianism. While introducing these rank-and-file activists, McGirr chronicles Orange County's rise from "nut country" to political vanguard. Through this history, she traces the evolution of the New Right from a virulent anticommunist, anti-establishment fringe to a broad national movement nourished by evangelical Protestantism. Her original contribution to the social history of politics broadens--and often upsets--our understanding of the deep and tenacious roots of popular conservatism in America.
Category: History

The Right Wing The Good The Bad And The Crazy

Author : Charles Phillip Rider
ISBN : 9781483630915
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 56.56 MB
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The book The Right Wing: the Good, the Bad, and the Crazy discusses the political right in the United States from Prohibition through recent speculation concerning the presidential campaign of 2016. A chapter is devoted to each U.S. President from Franklin Delano Roosevelt to George W. Bush. Many references are contained in the book concerning right wing personalities such as Robert Welch, Joe McCarthy, Barry Goldwater, Rush Limbaugh, Darrel Issa and others. Right wing organizations such as the John Birch Society, Fox News, and the Tea Party are analyzed. The Afterword section contains the authors solution to issues such as gun control, the U.S. Debt, the need for additional federal revenues, and the lack of medium and large U.S. corporations tax support of the U.S. government. Controversial issues such as sex education, immigration, and the present large gap between wealthy and middle class income are discussed in the book. The influence of the religious right in politics is analyzed. The author, Charles Rider, analyzes some of the above issues from an attorneys perspective. The book contains facts not generally known by readers such as Senator McCarthy, the communist witch hunter, subpoenaed many witnesses and forced them to testify in front of the Senate Permanent Sub Committee on Investigations. None of the witnesses ever went to jail or prison for communist activity. McCarthys committee records of witnesses testimony and background disappeared from the FBI files and the National Archives. During the Afghan War, Secretary of Defense, Donald Rumsfeld created a monetary reward program for information as to names of terrorists. Leaflets were distributed that the U.S. Government would pay up to $15,000 for names of terrorists. People turned in their enemies and sometimes goat herders and store clerks ended up in Guantanamo.
Category: Political Science

The Public And Its Possibilities

Author : John D. Fairfield
ISBN : 9781439902127
Genre : History
File Size : 32.32 MB
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In his compelling reinterpretation of American history, The Public and Its Possibilities, John Fairfieldargues that our unrealized civic aspirations provide the essential counterpoint to an excessive focus on private interests. Inspired by the revolutionary generation, nineteenth-century Americans struggled to build an economy and a culture to complement their republican institutions. But over the course of the twentieth century, a corporate economy and consumer culture undercut civic values, conflating consumer and citizen. Fairfield places the city at the center of American experience, describing how a resilient demand for an urban participatory democracy has bumped up against the fog of war, the allure of the marketplace, and persistent prejudices of race, class, and gender. In chronicling and synthesizing centuries of U.S. history—including the struggles of the antislavery, labor, women’s rights movements—Fairfield explores the ebb and flow of civic participation, activism, and democracy. He revisits what the public has done for civic activism, and the possibility of taking a greater role. In this age where there has been a move towards greater participation in America's public life from its citizens, Fairfield’s book—written in an accessible, jargon-free style and addressed to general readers—is especially topical.
Category: History

Christian Reconstruction

Author : Michael J. McVicar
ISBN : 9781469622750
Genre : Religion
File Size : 75.16 MB
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This is the first critical history of Christian Reconstruction and its founder and champion, theologian and activist Rousas John Rushdoony (1916–2001). Drawing on exclusive access to Rushdoony's personal papers and extensive correspondence, Michael J. McVicar demonstrates the considerable role Reconstructionism played in the development of the radical Christian Right and an American theocratic agenda. As a religious movement, Reconstructionism aims at nothing less than "reconstructing" individuals through a form of Christian governance that, if implemented in the lives of U.S. citizens, would fundamentally alter the shape of American society. McVicar examines Rushdoony's career and traces Reconstructionism as it grew from a grassroots, populist movement in the 1960s to its height of popularity in the 1970s and 1980s. He reveals the movement's galvanizing role in the development of political conspiracy theories and survivalism, libertarianism and antistatism, and educational reform and homeschooling. The book demonstrates how these issues have retained and in many cases gained potency for conservative Christians to the present day, despite the decline of the movement itself beginning in the 1990s. McVicar contends that Christian Reconstruction has contributed significantly to how certain forms of religiosity have become central, and now familiar, aspects of an often controversial conservative revolution in America.
Category: Religion

Neo Liberal Ideology

Author : Rachel S Turner
ISBN : 9780748688685
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 79.57 MB
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An original account of neo-liberalism's intellectual foundations, development and conceptual configuration as an ideology. Newly available in paperback.
Category: Political Science

Suburban Governance

Author : Pierre Hamel
ISBN : 9781442663572
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 88.78 MB
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North American gated communities, African squatter settlements, European housing estates, and Chinese urban villages all share one thing in common: they represent types of suburban space. As suburban growth becomes the dominant urban process of the twenty-first century, its governance poses an increasingly pressing set of global challenges. In Suburban Governance: A Global View, editors Pierre Hamel and Roger Keil have assembled a groundbreaking set of essays by leading urban scholars that assess how governance regulates the creation of the world’s suburban spaces and everyday life within them. With contributors from ten countries on five continents, this collection covers the full breadth of contemporary developments in suburban governance. Examining the classic North American model of suburbia, contemporary alternatives in Europe and Latin America, and the emerging suburbanisms of Africa and Asia, Suburban Governance offers a strong analytical introduction to a vital topic in contemporary urban studies.
Category: Political Science

Suburban Sprawl

Author : Matthew J. Lindstrom
ISBN : 0742525813
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 37.42 MB
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This book provides a comprehensive, multi-disciplinary analysis of suburban sprawl development and smart growth alternatives within the contexts of culture, ecology, and politics. It offers a mix of theoretical inquiry, historical analysis, policy critique, and case studies. In addition, each chapter is coupled with featured interviews with leading activists and policymakers working on sprawl issues. Visit our website for sample chapters!
Category: Political Science

Classroom Wars

Author : Natalia Mehlman Petrzela
ISBN : 9780199358472
Genre : History
File Size : 88.86 MB
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The schoolhouse has long been a crucible in the construction and contestation of the political concept of "family values." Through Spanish-bilingual and sex education, moderates and conservatives in California came to define the family as a politicized and racialized site in the late 1960s and 1970s. Sex education became a vital arena in the culture wars as cultural conservatives imagined the family as imperiled by morally lax progressives and liberals who advocated for these programs attempted to manage the onslaught of sexual explicitness in broader culture. Many moderates, however, doubted the propriety of addressing such sensitive issues outside the home. Bilingual education, meanwhile, was condemned as a symbol of wasteful federal spending on ethically questionable curricula and an intrusion on local prerogative. Spanish-language bilingual-bicultural programs may seem less relevant to the politics of family, but many Latino parents and students attempted to assert their authority, against great resistance, in impassioned demands to incorporate their cultural and linguistic heritage into the classroom. Both types of educational programs, in their successful implementation and in the reaction they inspired, highlight the rightward turn and enduring progressivism in postwar American political culture. In Classroom Wars, Natalia Mehlman Petrzela charts how a state and a citizenry deeply committed to public education as an engine of civic and moral education navigated the massive changes brought about by the 1960s, including the sexual revolution, school desegregation, and a dramatic increase in Latino immigration. She traces the mounting tensions over educational progressivism, cultural and moral decay, and fiscal improvidence, using sources ranging from policy documents to student newspapers, from course evaluations to oral histories. Petrzela reveals how a growing number of Americans fused values about family, personal, and civic morality, which galvanized a powerful politics that engaged many Californians and, ultimately, many Americans. In doing so, they blurred the distinction between public and private and inspired some of the fiercest classroom wars in American history. Taking readers from the cultures of Orange County mega-churches to Berkeley coffeehouses, Natalia Mehlman Petrzela's history of these classroom controversies sheds light on the bitterness of the battles over diversity we continue to wage today and their influence on schools and society nationwide.
Category: History

Law And Order

Author : Michael W. Flamm
ISBN : 9780231509725
Genre : History
File Size : 24.75 MB
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Law and Order offers a valuable new study of the political and social history of the 1960s. It presents a sophisticated account of how the issues of street crime and civil unrest enhanced the popularity of conservatives, eroded the credibility of liberals, and transformed the landscape of American politics. Ultimately, the legacy of law and order was a political world in which the grand ambitions of the Great Society gave way to grim expectations. In the mid-1960s, amid a pervasive sense that American society was coming apart at the seams, a new issue known as law and order emerged at the forefront of national politics. First introduced by Barry Goldwater in his ill-fated run for president in 1964, it eventually punished Lyndon Johnson and the Democrats and propelled Richard Nixon and the Republicans to the White House in 1968. In this thought-provoking study, Michael Flamm examines how conservatives successfully blamed liberals for the rapid rise in street crime and then skillfully used law and order to link the understandable fears of white voters to growing unease about changing moral values, the civil rights movement, urban disorder, and antiwar protests. Flamm documents how conservatives constructed a persuasive message that argued that the civil rights movement had contributed to racial unrest and the Great Society had rewarded rather than punished the perpetrators of violence. The president should, conservatives also contended, promote respect for law and order and contempt for those who violated it, regardless of cause. Liberals, Flamm argues, were by contrast unable to craft a compelling message for anxious voters. Instead, liberals either ignored the crime crisis, claimed that law and order was a racist ruse, or maintained that social programs would solve the "root causes" of civil disorder, which by 1968 seemed increasingly unlikely and contributed to a loss of faith in the ability of the government to do what it was above all sworn to do-protect personal security and private property.
Category: History