STONE ARTIFACTS OF TEXAS INDIANS

Download Stone Artifacts Of Texas Indians ebook PDF or Read Online books in PDF, EPUB, and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to STONE ARTIFACTS OF TEXAS INDIANS book pdf for free now.

Stone Artifacts Of Texas Indians

Author : Ellen Sue Turner
ISBN : 1589794656
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 77.19 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 969
Read : 389

Useful for academic and recreational archaeologists alike, this book identifies and describes over 200 projectile points and stone tools used by prehistoric Native American Indians in Texas. This third edition boasts twice as many illustrations—all drawn from actual specimens—and still includes charts, geographic distribution maps and reliable age-dating information. The authors also demonstrate how factors such as environment, locale and type of artifact combine to produce a portrait of theses ancient cultures.
Category: Social Science

A Field Guide To Stone Artifacts Of Texas Indians

Author : Ellen Sue Turner
ISBN : 9781461718178
Genre : History
File Size : 53.85 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 993
Read : 582

A Field Guide to Stone Artifacts of Texas Indians identifies and describes more than 200 dart and arrow projectile points and stone tools used by prehistoric Native Americans in Texas.
Category: History

The Texas Indians

Author : David La Vere
ISBN : 1585443018
Genre : History
File Size : 70.63 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 994
Read : 932

During an excavation in the 1950s, the bones of a prehistoric woman were discovered in Midland County, Texas. Archaeologists dubbed the woman “Midland Minnie.” Some believed her age to be between 20,000 and 37,000 years, making her remains the oldest ever found in the Western Hemisphere. While the accuracy of this date remains disputed, the find, along with countless others, demonstrates the wealth of human history that is buried beneath Texas soil. By the time the Europeans arrived in Texas in 1528, Native Texans included the mound-building Caddos of East Texas; Karankawas and Atakapas who fished the Texas coast; town-dwelling Jumanos along the Rio Grande; hunting-gathering Coahuiltecans in South Texas; and corn-growing Wichitas in the Panhandle. All of these native peoples had developed structures, traditions, governments, religions, and economies enabling them to take advantage of the land’s many resources. The arrival of Europeans brought horses, metal tools and weapons, new diseases and new ideas, all of which began to reshape the lives of Texas Indians. Over time, Texas became a home to horse-mounted, buffalo-hunting Apaches, Comanches, and Kiowas and a refuge for Puebloan Tiguas, Alabama-Coushattas, Kickapoos and many others. These groups traded, shared ideas, fought and made peace with one another as well as peoples outside of Texas. This book tells the story of all of these groups, their societies and cultures, and how they changed over the years. Author David La Vere offers a complete chronological and cultural history of Texas Indians from 12,000 years ago to the present day. He presents a unique view of their cultural history before and after European arrival, examining their interactions—both peaceful and violent—with Europeans, Mexicans, Texans, and Americans. This book is the first full examination of the history of Texas Indians in over forty years and will appeal to all of those with an interest in Native Americans and the history of Texas.
Category: History

Texas Indian Trails

Author : Daniel J. Gelo
ISBN : 9781461625698
Genre : Travel
File Size : 69.59 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 366
Read : 923

Connect the past with the present in Texas Indian Trails and appreciated this state's rich heritage by visiting the landmarks and campsites used by the Indians of Texas. This guidebook allows Texas natives and visitors to experience the Texas landscape as the Indians once knew it. Through local history and folklore, Texans will grow a new appreciation for their rich heritage, and visitors can learn to know Texas as the natives do.
Category: Travel

Learn About Texas Indians

Author : Georg Zappler
ISBN : 0292716842
Genre : Juvenile Nonfiction
File Size : 84.48 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 595
Read : 159

Topics range from the mammoth- and bison-hunting Paleo-Indians of over 11,000 years ago to the various nomadic and agricultural groups encountered by sixteenth-century Spanish explorers.
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

The Native Americans Of The Texas Edwards Plateau 1582 1799

Author : Maria F. Wade
ISBN : 0292791569
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 26.38 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 555
Read : 514

The region that now encompasses Central Texas and northern Coahuila, Mexico, was once inhabited by numerous Native hunter-gather groups whose identities and lifeways we are only now learning through archaeological discoveries and painstaking research into Spanish and French colonial records. From these key sources, Maria F. Wade has compiled this first comprehensive ethnohistory of the Native groups that inhabited the Texas Edwards Plateau and surrounding areas during most of the Spanish colonial era. Much of the book deals with events that took place late in the seventeenth century, when Native groups and Europeans began to have their first sustained contact in the region. Wade identifies twenty-one Native groups, including the Jumano, who inhabited the Edwards Plateau at that time. She offers evidence that the groups had sophisticated social and cultural mechanisms, including extensive information networks, ladino cultural brokers, broad-based coalitions, and individuals with dual-ethnic status. She also tracks the eastern movement of Spanish colonizers into the Edwards Plateau region, explores the relationships among Native groups and between those groups and European colonizers, and develops a timeline that places isolated events and singular individuals within broad historical processes.
Category: Social Science

The Prehistory Of Texas

Author : Timothy K. Perttula
ISBN : 9781603446495
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 61.86 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 244
Read : 168

Paleoindians first arrived in Texas more than eleven thousand years ago, although relatively few sites of such early peoples have been discovered. Texas has a substantial post-Paleoindian record, however, and there are more than fifty thousand prehistoric archaeological sites identified across the state. This comprehensive volume explores in detail the varied experience of native peoples who lived on this land in prehistoric times. Chapters on each of the regions offer cutting-edge research, the culmination of years of work by dozens of the most knowledgeable experts. Based on the archaeological record, the discussion of the earliest inhabitants includes a reclassification of all known Paleoindian projectile point types and establishes a chronology for the various occupations. The archaeological data from across the state of Texas also allow authors to trace technological changes over time, the development of intensive fishing and shellfish collecting, funerary customs and the belief systems they represented, long-term changes in settlement mobility and character, landscape use, and the eventual development of agricultural societies. The studies bring the prehistory of Texas Indians all the way up through the Late Prehistoric period (ca. a.d. 700–1600). The extensively illustrated chapters are broadly cultural-historical in nature but stay strongly focused on important current research problems. Taken together, they present careful and exhaustive considerations of the full archaeological (and paleoenvironmental) record of Texas.
Category: Social Science

The Archaeology Of The Caddo

Author : Timothy K. Perttula
ISBN : 9780803240469
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 88.26 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 997
Read : 565

This landmark volume provides the most comprehensive overview to date of the prehistory and archaeology of the Caddo peoples. The Caddos lived in the Southeastern Woodlands for more than 900 years beginning around A.D. 800–900, before being forced to relocate to Oklahoma in 1859. They left behind a spectacular archaeological record, including the famous Spiro Mound site in Oklahoma as well as many other mound centers, plazas, farmsteads, villages, and cemeteries. The Archaeology of the Caddo examines new advances in studying the history of the Caddo peoples, including ceramic analysis, reconstructions of settlement and regional histories of different Caddo communities, Geographic Information Systems and geophysical landscape studies at several spatial scales, the cosmological significance of mound and structure placements, and better ways to understand mortuary practices. Findings from major sites and drainages such as the Crenshaw site, mounds in the Arkansas River basin, Spiro Mound, the Oak Hill Village site, the George C. Davis site, the Willow Chute Bayou Locality, the Hughes site, Big Cypress Creek basin, and the McClelland and Joe Clark sites are also summarized and interpreted. This volume reintroduces the Caddos’ heritage, creativity, and political and religious complexity.
Category: Social Science