SPINDLE WHORLS

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Spindle Whorls

Author : Lindy Crewe
ISBN : IND:30000055856516
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 80.3 MB
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Category: Social Science

Susan Point

Author : Grant Arnold
ISBN : 1911164260
Genre : Art
File Size : 20.96 MB
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Susan Point: Spindle Whorl surveys the works of Coast Salish artist Susan Point that employ the spindle whorl. "Coast Salish" refers to a disparate group of Indigenous peoples settled in the Pacific Northwest. In the US they reside in Washington State and in Oregon, while in Canada they reside in British Columbia. The "spindle whorl" refers to a carved, circular plate attached to the end of a wooden spindle that acts to lend weight during the wool spinning process. In Coast Salish tradition spindle whorls are carved with powerful, symmetrical designs which blur and merge as the spindle turns. In Point's work, the spindle whorl is frequently used to make two-dimensional work, such as paper screen prints, in addition to being used with the traditional three-dimensional mediums of glass, wood carving, rawhide drums and wool. Due to her mixed-media use of the spindle whorl, Point is widely credited with introducing the tool into modern art. Point's work is discussed in the context of Canadian modern art in a Foreword by Kathleen Bartels, Director of the Vancouver Art Gallery. The project is overseen by editors Grant Arnold and Ian Thom. Arnold is currently Curator of British Columbian Art at the Vancouver Art Gallery, where, over the past 30 years, he has organized more than 60 exhibitions of historical, modern and contemporary art from British Columbia. Thom is a Senior Curator at the Vancouver Art Gallery. In 2009 he was awarded the Order of Canada for his work in advocating for Indigenous artists.
Category: Art

Science And Civilisation In China Volume 5 Chemistry And Chemical Technology Part 9 Textile Technology Spinning And Reeling

Author : Joseph Needham
ISBN : 0521320216
Genre : Science
File Size : 46.11 MB
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This study, the first of two parts, gives a comprehensive account of Chinese textiles and textile technology and deals with the evolution of bast fibre spinning and silk-reeling in the history of China. These operations are the basic techniques in the production of yarn and thread, pre-requisite to weaving, and any study of Chinese textile technology must start with the raw material obtained from fibre plants such as hemp, ramie, jute, cotton, etc, and silk reeled off from cocoons of the domestic silkworm. The time-span covered runs from the neolithic to the nineteenth century. Archaeological and pictoral evidence, the bulk of it hitherto unpublished in the West, is brought together with Chinese textual sources (which are extensively translated and interpreted) to illustrate Chinese achievements in this field. Professor Kuhn's study reveals the way in which Chinese textile-technological inventiveness has influenced textile production in other regions of the world and in medieval Europe. It explains how textile technology reached its high point between the tenth and thirteenth centuries and attempts to indicate the reasons for its subsequent relative decline. The development of the textile industry in Europe was a key factor in the rise of capitalism. In the case of China after Sung times, textile technology and the organisation of textile labour may help indicate why such a development did not take place in China.
Category: Science

A Central Asian Village At The Dawn Of Civilization

Author : Fredrik Hiebert
ISBN : 1931707502
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 63.39 MB
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This integration of earlier and new scholarship reconceptualizes the origins of civilization, challenging the received view that the ancient Near East spawned the spread of civilization outward from Mesopotamia to all other neighboring cultures. Central Asia is here shown to have been a major player in the development of cities. Skillfully documenting the different phases of both Soviet and earlier Western external analyses along with recent excavation results, this new interpretation reveals Central Asia's role in the socioeconomic and political processes linked to both the Iranian Plateau and the Indus Valley, showing how it contributed substantively to the origins of urbanism in the Old World. Hiebert's research at Anau and his focus on the Chalcolithic levels provide an essential starting point for understanding both the nature of village life and the historical trajectories that resulted in Bronze Age urbanism.
Category: Social Science

Prehistoric Textiles

Author : E. J. W. Barber
ISBN : 069100224X
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 55.58 MB
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This pioneering work revises our notions of the origins and early development of textiles in Europe and the Near East. Using innovative linguistic techniques, along with methods from palaeobiology and other fields, it shows that spinning and pattern weaving began far earlier than has been supposed. Prehistoric Textiles made an unsurpassed leap in the social and cultural understanding of textiles in humankind's early history. Cloth making was an industry that consumed more time and effort, and was more culturally significant to prehistoric cultures, than anyone assumed before the book's publication. The textile industry is in fact older than pottery--and perhaps even older than agriculture and stockbreeding. It probably consumed far more hours of labor per year, in temperate climates, than did pottery and food production put together. And this work was done primarily by women. Up until the Industrial Revolution, and into this century in many peasant societies, women spent every available moment spinning, weaving, and sewing. The author, Elizabeth Wayland Barber, demonstrates command of an almost unbelievably disparate array of disciplines--from historical linguistics to archaeology and paleobiology, from art history to the practical art of weaving. Her passionate interest in the subject matter leaps out on every page. Barber, a professor of linguistics and archaeology, developed expert sewing and weaving skills as a small girl under her mother's tutelage. One could say she had been born and raised to write this book. Because modern textiles are almost entirely made by machines, we have difficulty appreciating how time-consuming and important the premodern textile industry was. This book opens our eyes to this crucial area of prehistoric human culture.
Category: Social Science

Dress In Anglo Saxon England

Author : Gale R. Owen-Crocker
ISBN : 1843830817
Genre : Design
File Size : 30.4 MB
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An encyclopaedic study of English dress from the fifth to the eleventh centuries, drawing evidence from archaeology, text and art.
Category: Design

Creativity In The Bronze Age

Author : Lise Bender Jørgensen
ISBN : 9781108421362
Genre : Art
File Size : 29.37 MB
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This book explores the nature of creativity in the European Bronze Age through developments in pottery, textiles, and metalwork.
Category: Art

The Ancient Andean Village

Author : Kevin J. Vaughn
ISBN : 0816527067
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 67.39 MB
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Although ancient civilizations in the Andes are rich in historyÑwith expansive empires, skilled artisans, and vast temple centersÑthe history of the Andean foothills on the south coast of present-day Peru is only now being unveiled. Nasca, a prehispanic society that flourished there from AD 1 to 750, is best known for its polychrome pottery, its enigmatic geoglyphs (the "Nasca Lines"), and its ceremonial center, Cahuachi, which was the seat of power in early Nasca. However, despite the fact that archaeologists have studied Nasca civilization for more than a century, until now they have not pieced together the daily lives of Nasca residents. With this book, Kevin Vaughn offers the first portrait of village life in this ancient Andean society. Vaughn is interested in how societies develop and change, in particular their subsistence and political economies, interactions between elites and commoners, and the ritual activities of everyday life. By focusing on one village, Marcaya, he not only illuminates the lives and relationships of its people but he also contributes to an understanding of the more general roles played by villages in the growth of increasingly complex societies in the Andes. By examining agency in local affairs, he is able for the first time to explore the nature of power in Nasca and how it may have changed over time. By studying village and household activities, Vaughn argues, we can begin to appreciate from the ground up such essential activities as production, consumption, and the ideologies revealed by ritualsÑand thereby gain fresh insights into ancient civilizations.
Category: Social Science