SCHOOLING THE FREED PEOPLE TEACHING LEARNING AND THE STRUGGLE FOR BLACK FREEDOM 1861 1876

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Schooling The Freed People

Author : Ronald E. Butchart
ISBN : 0807899348
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 30.58 MB
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Conventional wisdom holds that freedmen's education was largely the work of privileged, single white northern women motivated by evangelical beliefs and abolitionism. Backed by pathbreaking research, Ronald E. Butchart's Schooling the Freed People shatters this notion. The most comprehensive quantitative study of the origins of black education in freedom ever undertaken, this definitive book on freedmen's teachers in the South is an outstanding contribution to social history and our understanding of African American education.
Category: Social Science

Schooling The Freed People

Author : Ronald E. Butchart
ISBN : 9780807834206
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 86.90 MB
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Conventional Wisdom Holds that freedmen's education was largely the work of privileged, single white northern women motivated by evangelical beliefs and abolitionism. Schooling the Freed People shatters this notion entirely. For the most comprehensive study of the origins of black education in freedom ever undertaken, Ronald Butchart combed the archives of all of the freedmen's aid organizations as well as the archives of every southern state to compile a vast database of over 11,600 individuals who taught in southern black schools between 1861 and 1876. Based on this pathbreaking research, he reaches some surprising conclusions: one-third of the teachers were African Americans; black teachers taught longer than white teachers; half of the teachers were southerners; and even the northern teachers were more diverse than previously imagined. His evidence demonstrates that evangelicalism contributed much less than previously belived to white teachers' commitment to black students, that abolitionism was a relatively small factor in motivating the teachers, and that, on the whole, the teachers' ideas and aspirations about their work often ran counter to the aspirations of the freed people for Schooling. The crowning achievement of a veteran scholar, this is the definitive book on freedmen's teachers in the South as well as an outstanding contribution to social history and our understanding of African American education.
Category: Social Science

Northern Schools Southern Blacks And Reconstruction

Author : Ronald E. Butchart
ISBN : UOM:39015000343361
Genre : Education
File Size : 76.29 MB
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This work is a revisionist interpretation of the work of the secular and religious aid societies and the Freedmen's Bureau in educating free blacks.
Category: Education

The Black Officer Corps

Author : Isaac Hampton
ISBN : 9780415531894
Genre : History
File Size : 40.69 MB
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The U.S. Armed Forces started integrating its services in 1948, and with that push, more African Americans started rising through the ranks to become officers, although the number of black officers has always been much lower than African Americans' total percentage in the military. Astonishingly, the experiences of these unknown reformers have largely gone unexamined and unreported, until now. The Black Officer Corps traces segments of the African American officers' experience from 1946-1973. From generals who served in the Pentagon and Vietnam, to enlisted servicemen and officers' wives, Isaac Hampton has conducted over seventy-five oral history interviews with African American officers. Through their voices, this book illuminates what they dealt with on a day to day basis, including cultural differences, racist attitudes, unfair promotion standards, the civil rights movement, Black Power, and the experience of being in ROTC at Historically Black Colleges. Hampton provides a nuanced study of the people whose service reshaped race relations in the U.S. Armed Forces, ending with how the military attempted to control racism with the creation of the Defense Race Relations Institute of 1971. The Black Officer Corps gives us a much fuller picture of the experience of black officers, and a place to start asking further questions.
Category: History

The South As It Is

Author : John Richard Dennett
ISBN : 9780817356309
Genre : History
File Size : 75.85 MB
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The South As It Is is a prophetic account of the recently defeated South at the beginning of Reconstruction.
Category: History

I Acted From Principle

Author : William Marcellus McPheeters
ISBN : UOM:39015055854825
Genre : History
File Size : 83.45 MB
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St. Louis physician and Southern sympathizer, Dr. McPheeters' experience with Federal arrest and banishment, plus his day-by-day account of life in camp and with the local populace, gives an excellent picture of the impact of the Civil War in the Western Theater. His daily diary is the first known daily account by a Confederate medical officer. The journal appears here in its complete and original form, exactly as the doctor first wrote it, with the addition of editors' full annoation and vivid introduction to each section.
Category: History

Hmong America

Author : Chia Youyee Vang
ISBN : 9780252077593
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 26.81 MB
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An unprecedented inside view of the Hmong experience in America.
Category: Social Science

In The Crossfire

Author : John P. Spencer
ISBN : 9780812207668
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 84.77 MB
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As media reports declare crisis after crisis in public education, Americans find themselves hotly debating educational inequalities that seem to violate their nation's ideals. Why does success in school track so closely with race and socioeconomic status? How to end these apparent achievement gaps? In the Crossfire brings historical perspective to these debates by tracing the life and work of Marcus Foster, an African American educator who struggled to reform urban schools in the 1960s and early 1970s. As a teacher, principal, and superintendent—first in his native Philadelphia and eventually in Oakland, California—Foster made success stories of urban schools and children whom others had dismissed as hopeless, only to be assassinated in 1973 by the previously unknown Symbionese Liberation Army in a bizarre protest against an allegedly racist school system. Foster's story encapsulates larger social changes in the decades after World War II: the great black migration from South to North, the civil rights movement, the decline of American cities, and the ever-increasing emphasis on education as a ticket to success. Well before the accountability agenda of the No Child Left Behind Act or the rise of charter schools, Americans came into sharp conflict over urban educational failure, with some blaming the schools and others pointing to conditions in homes and neighborhoods. By focusing on an educator who worked in the trenches and had a reputation for bridging divisions, In the Crossfire sheds new light on the continuing ideological debates over race, poverty, and achievement. Foster charted a course between the extremes of demanding too little and expecting too much of schools as agents of opportunity in America. He called for accountability not only from educators but also from families, taxpayers, and political and economic institutions. His effort to mobilize multiple constituencies was a key to his success—and a lesson for educators and policymakers who would take aim at achievement gaps without addressing the full range of school and nonschool factors that create them.
Category: Biography & Autobiography

Educational Reconstruction

Author : Hilary Green
ISBN : 9780823270118
Genre : Education
File Size : 70.36 MB
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"Tracing the first two decades of state-funded African American schools, Educational Reconstruction addresses the ways in which black Richmonders, black Mobilians, and their white allies created, developed, and sustained a system of African American schools following the Civil War. Hilary Green proposes a new chronology in understanding postwar African American education, examining how urban African Americans demanded quality public schools from their new city and state partners. Revealing the significant gains made after the departure of the Freedmen's Bureau, this study reevaluates African American higher education in terms of developing a cadre of public school educator-activists and highlights the centrality of urban African American protest in shaping educational decisions and policies in their respective cities and states."
Category: Education