SAPELO PEOPLE AND PLACE ON A GEORGIA SEA ISLAND

Download Sapelo People And Place On A Georgia Sea Island ebook PDF or Read Online books in PDF, EPUB, and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to SAPELO PEOPLE AND PLACE ON A GEORGIA SEA ISLAND book pdf for free now.

Sapelo

Author : Buddy Sullivan
ISBN : 0820350168
Genre : History
File Size : 51.66 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 592
Read : 721

"Sapelo will be a resource to both scholars and general readers wishing to know more about the island's history. The book uses both primary and secondary sources to paint a picture of the island's many dimensions and discrete periods (e.g. ecological, Native American, Spanish mission, antebellum plantation, African-American, and twentieth century)"--
Category: History

Early Days On The Georgia Tidewater A New Revised Edition

Author : Buddy Sullivan
ISBN : 1543930158
Genre : History
File Size : 54.68 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 748
Read : 944

Early Days on the Georgia Tidewater: A New Revised Edition represents a complete recasting of a book issued under the same title by the author in 1990, and reprinted five times since, each time with new material. Buddy Sullivan is a leading coastal Georgia historian and lecturer with 20 titles to his credit, including Sapelo: People and Place on a Georgia Sea Island (2017) and the ecologically-focused Environmental Influences on Life & Labor in McIntosh County, Georgia (2018). This new version of Early Days incorporates into a single narrative all of the material in the original version of the book, in addition to considerable new information based on the author's more recent historical research. Additionally, the new Early Days has been reformatted with improved chapter sequence and content to provide a smoother, more continuous, narrative flow. In essence, the revised edition is a completely new book that will be of improved utility to researchers, students, and the general reader. Early Days on the Georgia Tidewater is a comprehensive history of Sapelo Island, Darien and McIntosh County, Georgia. It covers the full scope of local history: early settlement by Guale Indians, Spanish missionaries and English colonists; the prosperous rice and cotton economy of the region during the antebellum plantation era--built on the labors of enslaved people; Civil War events, including the controversial burning of Darien; the timber industry, and associated international shipping activity that made Darien a leading center for the export of pine lumber; and the impact of millionaires, scientists and resident African Americans on the 20th century history of Sapelo Island. The revised edition of Early Days tells the story of the area's Geechee settlements of Sapelo, Harris Neck and Darien in the years from the end of the Civil War to the 20th century. The author's thematic approach to Early Days is that of establishing the important connection between the ecology of the area with its history. This recurring theme will be apparent throughout the book, particularly in the analysis of just how people utilized the environmental circumstances so unique to their region and adapted them to virtually every aspect of their lives and livelihood for 300 years. Early Days is thus a story of land use and how ecological conditions affected the economic development of the region. Of equal significance is the use people have made of the local tidal waterways and fresh-water river systems, another thematic approach that gives Early Days a distinctly maritime flavor.
Category: History

The Hoffman Reports

Author : Jeffrey Hoffman
ISBN : 9781387608188
Genre : Performing Arts
File Size : 89.12 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 546
Read : 711

From an idyllic, early 50's childhood in the Golden Isles of Georgia, to a long relaxing retirement on Sea Island, the author recalls people, places, events and historical details of interest to both visitors and current residents. More than 250 easy-reading articles have been selected from those previously published as ""The Hoffman Reports"" column in the local ""Weekend"" newspaper or as invited articles to the ""Brunswick News,"" ""Elegant Island Living"" and ""The Golden Isles Magazine.""
Category: Performing Arts

Early Days On The Georgia Tidewater

Author : Buddy Sullivan
ISBN : 1483593592
Genre :
File Size : 85.98 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 143
Read : 798

Author Buddy Sullivan's "Early Days on the Georgia Tidewater: A New Revised Edition" represents a complete recasting of a book issued under the same title in 1990, and reprinted five times. Sullivan is a prominent coastal Georgia historian and lecturer with nineteen titles to his credit. This new edition of "Early Days" incorporates all the material in the original version, in addition to considerable new information based on the author’s recent research. Additionally, the new "Early Days" has been reformatted to reflect improved chapter sequence and content to provide a smoother, more continuous narrative flow than that of the original edition. In essence, the revised edition is a completely new book that will be of improved utility to researchers, students, and the general reader. "Early Days on the Georgia Tidewater" is a comprehensive history of Sapelo Island, Darien and McIntosh County, Georgia, as well as a general overview of the history of coastal Georgia, focusing on Glynn, Liberty and Bryan counties, Savannah, and St. Simons and St. Catherines islands. It covers the full scope of coastal history: Guale Indians, Spanish missionaries, and early settlement by English colonists; the rice and cotton economy during the plantation era built upon the labors of enslaved peop≤ Civil War events, including the controversial burning of Darien; the timber industry, and the associated shipping activity that made Darien a leading center for the export of pine lumber for forty years; the emerging commercial oyster and shrimping fisheries; and the impact of millionaires, scientists and resident African Americans on the 20th century history of the region, especially Sapelo Island. Significantly, the new edition of "Early Days" relates the story of the area’s African American communities, particularly the developing Geechee settlements at Sapelo, Harris Neck and Darien in the years from the end of the Civil War through the 20th century. The author’s thematic approach is that of establishing the important connection between the ecology of the area with its history. This recurring theme will be apparent throughout the book in an analysis of just how people utilized the environmental circumstances unique to their region and adapted them to virtually every aspect of their lives and livelihood for 300 years. "Early Days" is thus essentially a story of land use and landscape: soils, tides, salt marshes, river hydrology, weather, and how these conditions impacted the agricultural, commercial and social development of the region. Of equal significance is the use people have made of the tidal waterways and fresh-water river systems, giving the new edition a distinctly maritime flavor. "Early Days on the Georgia Tidewater" is documented through source notes and an expanded index, and includes photographs of places and people, and localized maps that provide the geographical context necessary for an understanding of the economic, maritime and cultural dynamics of the coast.
Category:

Sapelo Island

Author : Buddy Sullivan
ISBN : 9781439627693
Genre : Photography
File Size : 36.16 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 740
Read : 912

The barrier islands of the south Atlantic coastline have for years held a deep attraction for all who have come into contact with them. Few, however, can compare with the mystique of Sapelo Island, Georgia. This unique semitropical paradise evokes a time long forgotten, when antebellum cotton plantations dominated her landscape, all worked by hundreds of black slaves, the descendants of whom have lived in quiet solitude on the island for generations. For more than 50 years of the twentieth century, two millionaires held sway on Sapelo, and it is their story, interwoven with that of the island’s residents, that unfolds within the pages of this book. Almost 200 photographs provide testimony to the dynamic forces and energies implanted upon Sapelo by two men, Howard E. Coffin, a Detroit automotive pioneer, and Richard J. Reynolds Jr., heir to a huge North Carolina tobacco fortune. Beginning with a photographic essay about Sapelo’s antebellum plantation owner, Thomas Spalding, Sapelo Island moves into the primary focus of the story, the years from 1912 to 1964, an era of grandeur that has left a rich photographic legacy.
Category: Photography

Slave Songs Of The Georgia Sea Islands

Author :
ISBN : 0820323896
Genre : Music
File Size : 74.18 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 352
Read : 761

A valuable collection of folk music and lore from the Gullah culture, Slave Songs of the Georgia Sea Islands preserves the rich traditions of slave descendants on the barrier islands of Georgia by interweaving their music with descriptions of their language, religious and social customs, and material culture. Collected over a period of nearly twenty-five years by Lydia Parrish, the sixty folk songs and attendant lore included in this book are evidence of antebellum traditions kept alive in the relatively isolated coastal regions of Georgia. Over the years, Parrish won the confidence of many of the African-American singers, not only collecting their songs but also discovering other elements of traditional culture that formed the context of those songs. When it was first published in 1942, Slave Songs of the Georgia Sea Islands contained much material that had not previously appeared in print. The songs are grouped in categories, including African survival songs; shout songs; ring-play, dance, and fiddle songs; and religious and work songs. In additions to the lyrics and melodies, Slave Songs includes Lydia Parrish's explanatory notes, character sketches of her informants, anecdotes, and a striking portfolio of photographs. Reproduced in its original oversized format, Slave Songs of the Georgia Sea Islands will inform and delight students and scholars of African-American culture and folklore as well as folk music enthusiasts.
Category: Music

Witness To Reconstruction

Author : Kathleen Diffley
ISBN : 1617030260
Genre : Literary Criticism
File Size : 29.40 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 634
Read : 978

In the wake of the Civil War, Constance Fenimore Woolson became one of the first northern observers to linger in the defeated states from Virginia to Florida. Born in New Hampshire in 1840 and raised in Ohio, she was the grandniece of James Fenimore Cooper and was gaining success as a writer when she departed in 1873 for St. Augustine. During the next six years, she made her way across the South and reported what she saw, first in illustrated travel accounts and then in the poetry, stories, and serialized novels that brought unsettled social relations to the pages of Harper's Monthly, the Atlantic, Scribner's Monthly, Appletons' Journal, and the Galaxy. In the midst of Reconstruction and in print for years to come, Woolson revealed the sharp edges of loss, the sharper summons of opportunity, and the entanglements of northern misperceptions a decade before the waves of well-heeled tourists arrived during the 1880s. This volume's sixteen essays are intent on illuminating, through her example, the neglected world of Reconstruction's backwaters in literary developments that were politically charged and genuinely unpredictable. Drawing upon the postcolonial and transnational perspectives of New Southern Studies, as well as the cultural history, intellectual genealogy, and feminist priorities that lend urgency to the portraits of the global South, this collection investigates the mysterious, ravaged territory of a defeated nation as curious northern readers first saw it.
Category: Literary Criticism

Making Gullah

Author : Melissa L. Cooper
ISBN : 9781469632698
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 81.27 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 925
Read : 1117

During the 1920s and 1930s, anthropologists and folklorists became obsessed with uncovering connections between African Americans and their African roots. At the same time, popular print media and artistic productions tapped the new appeal of black folk life, highlighting African-styled voodoo as an essential element of black folk culture. A number of researchers converged on one site in particular, Sapelo Island, Georgia, to seek support for their theories about "African survivals," bringing with them a curious mix of both influences. The legacy of that body of research is the area's contemporary identification as a Gullah community. This wide-ranging history upends a long tradition of scrutinizing the Low Country blacks of Sapelo Island by refocusing the observational lens on those who studied them. Cooper uses a wide variety of sources to unmask the connections between the rise of the social sciences, the voodoo craze during the interwar years, the black studies movement, and black land loss and land struggles in coastal black communities in the Low Country. What emerges is a fascinating examination of Gullah people's heritage, and how it was reimagined and transformed to serve vastly divergent ends over the decades.
Category: Social Science

Sacral Grooves Limbo Gateways

Author : Keith Cartwright
ISBN : 9780820342139
Genre : Literary Criticism
File Size : 38.8 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 616
Read : 960

“We're seeing people that we didn't know exist,” the director of FEMA acknowledged in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. Sacral Grooves, Limbo Gateways offers a corrective to some of America's institutionalized invisibilities by delving into the submerged networks of ritual performance, writing, intercultural history, and migration that have linked the coastal U.S. South with the Caribbean and the wider Atlantic world. This interdisciplinary study slips beneath the bar of rigid national and literary periods, embarking upon deeper—more rhythmic and embodied—signatures of time. It swings low through ecologies and symbolic orders of creolized space. And it reappraises pluralistic modes of knowledge, kinship, and authority that have sustained vital forms of agency (such as jazz) amid abysses of racialized trauma. Drawing from Haitian Vodou and New Orleanian Voudou and from Cuban and South Floridian Santería, as well as from Afro-Baptist (Caribbean, Geechee, and Bahamian) models of encounters with otherness, this book reemplaces deep-southern texts within the counterclockwise ring-stepping of a long Afro-Atlantic modernity. Turning to an orphan girl's West African initiation tale to follow a remarkably traveled body of feminine rites and writing (in works by Paule Marshall, Zora Neale Hurston, Lydia Cabrera, William Faulkner, James Weldon Johnson, and LeAnne Howe, among others), Cartwright argues that only in holistic form, emergent from gulfs of cross-cultural witness, can literary and humanistic authority find legitimacy. Without such grounding, he contends, our educational institutions blind and even poison students, bringing them to “swallow lye,” like the grandson of Phoenix Jackson in Eudora Welty's “A Worn Path.” Here, literary study may open pathways to alternative medicines—fetched by tenacious avatars like Phoenix (or an orphan Kumba or a shell-shaking Turtle)—to remedy the lies our partial histories have made us swallow.
Category: Literary Criticism

First Fruits Of Freedom

Author : Janette Thomas Greenwood
ISBN : 0807895784
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 29.14 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 461
Read : 1112

A moving narrative that offers a rare glimpse into the lives of African American men, women, and children on the cusp of freedom, First Fruits of Freedom chronicles one of the first collective migrations of blacks from the South to the North during and after the Civil War. Janette Thomas Greenwood relates the history of a network forged between Worcester County, Massachusetts, and eastern North Carolina as a result of Worcester regiments taking control of northeastern North Carolina during the war. White soldiers from Worcester, a hotbed of abolitionism, protected refugee slaves, set up schools for them, and led them north at war's end. White patrons and a supportive black community helped many migrants fulfill their aspirations for complete emancipation and facilitated the arrival of additional family members and friends. Migrants established a small black community in Worcester with a distinctive southern flavor. But even in the North, white sympathy did not continue after the Civil War. Despite their many efforts, black Worcesterites were generally disappointed in their hopes for full-fledged citizenship, reflecting the larger national trajectory of Reconstruction and its aftermath.
Category: Social Science