ROMES PRIDE TRUE MATES BOOK 6

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True Mates Rome S Pride

Author : Zena Wynn
ISBN : 9780997279122
Genre : Fiction
File Size : 86.26 MB
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Though she’s moved on with her life, Zuri Buhari has never forgiven Rome for choosing his career over her. So when a situation in her pride turns deadly, the last person she expects to come flying to the rescue is her long, lost mate. He promises to neutralize the threat, but when the danger has passed, will history repeat itself? Sheriff Rome Barrio’s been watching and waiting for an opportunity to claim the mate he left behind fifteen long years ago. When Zuri’s life is endangered, he drops everything and rushes to her side. Now that they’re together again, can he convince Zuri this time he wants forever?
Category: Fiction

True Mates Mary And The Bear

Author : Zena Wynn
ISBN : 9780997279139
Genre : Fiction
File Size : 53.37 MB
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Mary Elizabeth’s life is spiraling out of control. Her twin sister was killed in an automobile accident. Her bereaved brother-in-law has decided now is a good time to renew their college romance, and her healthy, domineering mother is demanding she move home and slave, ah, make that care for her. What’s a woman to do? Get the heck out of Dodge! She jumps on the promotion offered by her best friend, Kiesha Morgan, and moves to Refuge, NC. The last thing she wants or needs is a man. She’s got enough going on in her life. Hugh Mosely, owner of Refuge’s only eating establishment, as a favor to Alex Wolfe, good friend and alpha of the Raven Pack, agrees to rent the empty apartment above his diner to Mary Elizabeth and keep an eye on her. Hugh’s also a bear-shifter actively searching for a mate, a she-bear he can breed with and continue his nearly extinct species. Despite his nearly overwhelming, explosive attraction to Mary Elizabeth, he has no interest in human females. Unfortunately (or is that fortunately?) for them, the true mate bond doesn’t care about personal agendas. Watch as they both get caught up in the mating fever and try to fight their way out.
Category: Fiction

Romeo S Regret

Author : Liza Kay
ISBN : 9781487418069
Genre : Fiction
File Size : 58.40 MB
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Regret has always been Romeo's constant companion. Will he add to his own pain and let his chance for love slip through his fingers?
Category: Fiction

The Revelations Of St Birgitta Of Sweden Volume 3

Author : Denis Searby
ISBN : 9780195166279
Genre : Literary Collections
File Size : 83.70 MB
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St. Birgitta of Sweden (1303-1373, canonized 1391) was one of the most charismatic and influential female visionaries of the later Middle Ages. She received some 700 revelations, dealing with subjects ranging from meditations on the human condition, domestic affairs in Sweden, and ecclesiastical matters in Rome, to revelations in praise of the Incarnation and devotion to the Virgin. This is the third and penultimate volume of the translation of the Revelations of St. Birgitta of Sweden, comprising the last part of the central canon, Books VI and VII.
Category: Literary Collections

Romeo And Juliet

Author : William Shakespeare
ISBN : OCLC:944956365
Genre :
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Encyclopedia Of Ancient Literature Fact On File 2008

Author : James Wyatt Cook
ISBN :
Genre : Literary Criticism
File Size : 68.24 MB
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It has oft en struck me that, when Ecclesiastes off ers the opinion in the Hebrew Bible that there is no end to books and that much study is wearisome for the fl esh, the author must have been trying to compile an encyclopedia of ancient literature. As far back into the mists of history as one can peer, there are at least allusions to prior books or to earlier poets. As soon as people perceived that they could invent systems of symbols to represent words, syllables, phonemes, or variations in pitch, they started to do it. Almost everywhere in the old world and in some places in the new, people invented such systems as long as 5,000 years ago— the Chinese perhaps as long as 7,000 years ago. Th ough at Ā rst they probably employed writing systems to keep rec ords for purposes of taxation, inventory, and the like, they soon began to employ such systems to record their national or tribal stories—their myths, their genealogies, and their histories. Many of the stories that entered the record early and that still remain in it have to do with famous men and women—oft en rulers or military leaders, but sometimes artists and poets— who achieved divine or quasi- divine status. Not much later, artists began, like Sappho, to sing songs of themselves. Most of the earliest surviving works are in verse, and much was originally set to music. Th at fact alone suggests a prewriting tradition of re citing aloud and singing the stories that have survived. So does the widespread appearance of similar stories explaining cosmology. One notes, for example, that the Roman sky god, Uranus, had a precisely functional and linguistically cognate counterpart in the ancient South Indian sky god, Varuna. Th eir stories spring from a lost but clearly common oral source. Examples of such sources are to be found in the Nart Sagas. Th ese contain stories that have survived the ages in oral form and only recently been recorded in writing. Th ere are, of course, major diff erences between then and now. Modern readers think of literature as occupying the same territory as belles lettres— novels, poems, short stories, and artsy memoirs. For the ancients, the literary arena was much broader. Geography, physics, court cases, mathematics, the praise of athletes, history, cookbooks, philosophy, and war songs as well as drama and intensely emotional lyrics all were lumped under the rubric of literature. So were explanations of how the universe got started and books on farming and beekeeping. For a modern writer, trying to bring a sense of such matters to a general audience composed principally of high school and college students and teachers, the problem becomes one of selection. Th is work deals mainly with primary texts. Although teaching young people to write research papers requires that they have recourse to journals and scholarly commentary, the result of such papers is “commentary on commentary”—a useful phrase coined by Richard Brown of the Newberry Library. Th is book, instead, is meant to acquaint learners with what they may expect to Ā nd in broadly literary, ancient texts and to give the same learners an introductory overview about the people who wrote the works and the traditions in which those writers developed. For readers wishing to pursue an interest into the secondary literature concerning it, I have tried to include references in the bibliographies at the end of each entry to the most recent scholarly translations into En glish. When no En glish translation is available, I have selected a Spanish, Italian, or French translation on the theory that, in polyglot contemporary America, many readers may have one of those Eu ro pe an languages as a Ā rst or second tongue. Such scholarly editions of the primary texts almost always survey the most useful secondary literature, and the Internet is also a fruitful source of supplemental bibliography. Beyond that, however, for those readers whose interests do lead them into the thicket of critical discussion concerning the languages and literatures of the ancient world, at the end of this encyclopedia, I have provided a bibliography in two sections. Th e Ā rst section lists important secondary works addressing the literatures covered in this encyclopedia. Th e second section lists and lightly annotates indispensable bibliographic resources for conducting both apprentice and advanced scholarship in most of the languages and literatures discussed in these pages. In the entries themselves, I have tried to give a fair sample of as many ancient literary traditions as I could get a handle on in the time available to write this book. As a starting point, I have included a generous sample of Greek and Roman letters from their beginnings well into the Christian era. I have tried both to cover and to go signiĀ cantly beyond the classical canon suggested by scholars such as Harold Bloom. Nonetheless, signiĀ cant coverage is devoted to all the writers and works commonly encountered in high school and college classes, such as Ā e Iliad, Ā e Odyssey, Ā e Aeneid, the works of the great Greek dramatists, and more. Note that some famous works have been translated under more than one title. To make this book as accessible as possible to students, I have always tried to choose the title most familiar to modern readers—which in some cases is an En glish- language title and in some is the original- language title or transliteration. With respect to the ancient texts of Hindu India, I have tried to hit the high spots. Indian letters contain an inexhaustible trove of treasure. Th e full and unexpurgated text of the Maha bharata—India’s national epic—is only now becoming fully available in En glish for the Ā rst time. Bringing that work to fruition will require 16 volumes, each almost 4 inches thick. Beyond Hindu writings, I have also included entries about Buddhist and Jain scriptures. Scholarship in ancient Chinese studies has blossomed in the last two de cades. Archaeological digs at Ma Wang Dui and elsewhere have unearthed the earliest known versions of classic Chinese Confucian and Taoist texts. As a result, wonderful translations of many ancient Chinese texts are now available for the Ā rst time, and more appear each year. As I said in the preface, this is the golden era of ancient Chinese studies, and of course a good deal of literary cross- pollination occurred between China and India—especially with respect to Buddhist texts. Japa nese literature starts late. Th e Japa nese borrowed Chinese characters and adapted them to represent the Japa nese tongue. Th e earliest surviving work of Japa nese literature is the Kojiki (Record of Ancient Matters), which appeared in 712 c.e. Elsewhere, particularly in South America and Mesoamerica about the time of Socrates and Plato in Greece, writing was also fl ourishing. Th ough much of what was written has yet to be deciphered fully, it seems that the rec ords of kings and gods and matters of astronomy and cosmology occupied the thoughts of Zapotec and Mayan writers viii Encyclopedia of Ancient Literature just as such matters interested the ancient Sumerians and Babylonians. Th e ancestors of Incan culture also devised a method for keeping track of all sorts of numerical matters—including tax records—with a system of knotted strings. Whether they also adapted this system to represent language is unclear, but an entry on quipu is included, just in case. Although documents representing Western Hemi sphere traditions exist, the ones we know well date to shortly before the period of Eu ro pe an contact. Technically, one could deĀ ne ancient as describing the moment that a language ceases living exclusively in the mouths of its speakers and achieves symbolic repre sen ta tion. Such an operational deĀ nition, however, is an impracticable basis for a one- volume reference work, so I have largely ignored the literature of languages whose written repre sen ta tion begins much later than the fall of the Western Roman Empire. Th e literature of sub- Saharan Africa represents a similar case. Th ese literatures are covered in two companion volumes published by Facts On File, Encyclopedia of Medieval Literature and Encyclopedia of Re nais sance Literature. Egypt, of course, developed its hieroglyphic system of writing very early. I have chosen to represent the literature of Egypt with a description of Ā e Egyptian Book of the Dead. A discussion of the Hebrew Bible, of representative Apochrypha, and of the Dead Sea Scrolls represents my principal forays into just as such matters interested the ancient Sumerians and Babylonians. Th e ancestors of Incan culture also devised a method for keeping track of all sorts of numerical matters—including tax records—with a system of knotted strings. Whether they also adapted this system to represent language is unclear, but an entry on quipu is included, just in case. Although documents representing Western Hemi sphere traditions exist, the ones we know well date to shortly before the period of Eu ro pe an contact. Technically, one could deĀ ne ancient as describing the moment that a language ceases living exclusively in the mouths of its speakers and achieves symbolic repre sen ta tion. Such an operational deĀ nition, however, is an impracticable basis for a one- volume reference work, so I have largely ignored the literature of languages whose written repre sen ta tion begins much later than the fall of the Western Roman Empire. Th e literature of sub- Saharan Africa represents a similar case. Th ese literatures are covered in two companion volumes published by Facts On File, Encyclopedia of Medieval Literature and Encyclopedia of Re nais sance Literature. Egypt, of course, developed its hieroglyphic system of writing very early. I have chosen to represent the literature of Egypt with a description of Ā e Egyptian Book of the Dead. A discussion of the Hebrew Bible, of representative Apochrypha, and of the Dead Sea Scrolls represents my principal forays into ancient writing in Hebrew. In addition to brief biographies of writers and sometimes- lengthy overviews of representative works, I have tried to provide useful deĀ nitions of literary terms. Readers may trace crossreferences of interest by pursuing the words in sma l l c a pit a l l et t er s to other alphabetically listed entries where those terms occur and, by following the guide thus provided, may achieve a more comprehensive view of subjects of par tic ular interest. I have also tried to present topical entries, such as the one deĀ ning patristic exegesis and others dealing with Greek stage conventions and like matters, to assist those readers who are trying to grasp the points of view of ancient writers. Many of the works that deal with the origins of the universe and human beings and books that explore ethical matters occupy the status of Scripture in their cultures. Some of the books are so revered that their adherents consider them to have been without authors and to have existed from eternity. Others assert the divine inspiration of human authors. Despite my occasional moments of panic when it seemed unlikely that I could actually read enough about the aspects of these subjects that were unfamiliar to me, I hope that readers will perceive how much I have enjoyed bringing them these articles and synopses. I have had the opportunity both to return to texts more than half forgotten and to peruse new ones that I might never have read otherwise. Mostly, it has been great fun. —J. W. C. Albion, Michigan February 10, 2007
Category: Literary Criticism