RISING TIDE THE GREAT MISSISSIPPI FLOOD OF 1927 AND HOW IT CHANGED AMERICA

Download Rising Tide The Great Mississippi Flood Of 1927 And How It Changed America ebook PDF or Read Online books in PDF, EPUB, and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to RISING TIDE THE GREAT MISSISSIPPI FLOOD OF 1927 AND HOW IT CHANGED AMERICA book pdf for free now.

Rising Tide

Author : John M. Barry
ISBN : 9781416563327
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 76.32 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 916
Read : 709

An American epic of science, politics, race, honor, high society, and the Mississippi River, Rising Tide tells the riveting and nearly forgotten story of the greatest natural disaster this country has ever known -- the Mississippi flood of 1927. The river inundated the homes of nearly one million people, helped elect Huey Long governor and made Herbert Hoover president, drove hundreds of thousands of blacks north, and transformed American society and politics forever. A New York Times Notable Book of the Year, winner of the Southern Book Critics Circle Award and the Lillian Smith Award.
Category: Social Science

Rising Tide

Author : John M. Barry
ISBN : UVA:X004092027
Genre : Science
File Size : 29.22 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 299
Read : 879

Provides an account of one of the greatest national disasters the United States has ever experienced and its consequences
Category: Science

Power Plays

Author : John M. Barry
ISBN : 157806404X
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 21.53 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 905
Read : 387

Barry, award-winning author of "
Category: Political Science

Roger Williams And The Creation Of The American Soul

Author : John M. Barry
ISBN : 9780143122883
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 61.77 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 611
Read : 865

A revelatory analysis of the 17th-century theologian's integral role in shaping early America's religion, political power and individual rights places his story against a backdrop of Puritanism and the English Civil War while providing coverage of such subjects as Edward Coke and the evolving debate on the separation of church and state. By the award-winning author of Rising Tide.
Category: Biography & Autobiography

The Great Influenza

Author : John M. Barry
ISBN : 1101200979
Genre : History
File Size : 73.40 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 571
Read : 256

The definitive account of the 1918 Flu Epidemic. "Monumental"-Chicago Tribune. At the height of WWI, history’s most lethal influenza virus erupted in an army camp in Kansas, moved east with American troops, then exploded, killing as many as 100 million people worldwide. It killed more people in twenty-four months than AIDS killed in twenty-four years, more in a year than the Black Death killed in a century. But this was not the Middle Ages, and 1918 marked the first collision of science and epidemic disease. Magisterial in its breadth of perspective and depth of research and now revised to reflect the growing danger of the avian flu, The Great Influenza is ultimately a tale of triumph amid tragedy, which provides us with a precise and sobering model as we confront the epidemics looming on our own horizon. John M. Barry has written a new afterword for this edition that brings us up to speed on the terrible threat of the avian flu and suggest ways in which we might head off another flu pandemic.
Category: History

Flood

Author : Kathleen Duey
ISBN : 9781481416443
Genre : Juvenile Fiction
File Size : 37.43 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 633
Read : 309

A rushing river with rapidly rising waters threatens the lives—and life savings—of two resourceful kids in this thrilling tale of historical fiction, part of the Survivors series. For years, Garret and Molly have dreamed of seeing more of the world than cotton fields and the dusty poverty of their Mississippi Delta farms. They’ve been stashing away hard-earned pennies and nickels in a tin-can bank, hidden deep in the bayou. Now rising flood waters threaten the hiding place of their money, and they set out on their homemade raft to retrieve it. But the raging Mississippi has other plans, and suddenly Garrett and Molly find themselves in a deadly battle with the dangerous currents and roiling rapids of their debris-strewn river—fighting not for their life savings, but for their lives.
Category: Juvenile Fiction

Deep N As It Come

Author : Pete Daniel
ISBN : 1557284016
Genre : History
File Size : 27.57 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 791
Read : 1183

The spring and summer of 1927, the Mississippi River and its tributaries flooded from Cairo, Illinois, to New Orleans, Louisiana, and the Gulf of Mexico, tearing through seven states, sometimes spreading out to nearly one hundred miles across. Pete Daniel's Deep'n as It Come, available again in a new format, chronicles the worst flood in the history of the South and re-creates, with extraordinary immediacy, the Mississippi River's devastating assault on property and lives. Daniel weaves his narrative with newspaper and firsthand accounts, interviews with survivors, official reports, and over 140 contemporary photographs. The story of the common refugee who suffered most from the effects of the flood emerges alongside the details of the massive rescue and relief operation - one of the largest ever mounted in the United States. The title, Deep'n as It Come, is a phrase from Cora Lee Campbell's earthy description of the approaching water, which, Daniel writes, "moved at a pace of some fourteen miles per day," and, in its movement and sound, "had the eeriness of a full eclipse of the sun, unsettling, chilling." "The contradictions of sorrow and humor,... death and salvation, despair and hope, calm and panic - all reveal the human dimension" in this compassionate and unforgettable portrait of common people confronting a great natural disaster.
Category: History

Forgotten Time

Author : John C. Willis
ISBN : 0813919827
Genre : History
File Size : 75.93 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 970
Read : 287

Although it came to epitomize the Cotton South in the twentieth century, the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta emerged as a distinct entity in the decades following the Civil War. As other southerners confronted the need to rebuild, the Delta remained mostly wilderness in 1865. Elsewhere, planters struggled to maintain the perquisites of slaveholding and poor families tried desperately to escape the sharecropper's lot, yet Delta landlords offered generous terms to freed people willing to clear and cultivate backcountry acres subject to yellow fever and yearly flooding. By the turn of the century, two-thirds of the region's farmers were African Americans, whose holdings represented great political and economic strength. Most historical studies of the Delta have either lauded the achievements of its white planters or found its record number of lynchings representative of the worst aspects of the New South. By looking beyond white planters to the region as a whole, John C. Willis uncovers surprising evidence of African-American enterprise, the advantages of tenancy in an unstable cotton market, and the dominance of foreign-born merchants in the area, including many Chinese. Examining the lives of individuals--freedmen, planters, and merchants--Willis explores the reciprocal interests of former slaves and former slaveholders. He shows how, in a cruel irony replicated in other areas of the South, the backbreaking work that African Americans did to clear, settle, and farm the land away from the river made the land ultimately too valuable for them to retain. By the beginning of the twentieth century, the Delta began to devolve back into a stereotypical southern region with African Americans cast back into an impoverished, debt-ridden labor system. The Yazoo-Mississippi Delta has long been seen as a focal point for the study of Reconstruction, and Forgotten Time enters this historiographical tradition at the same time that it reverses many of its central assumptions.
Category: History

The Flood Year 1927

Author : Susan Scott Parrish
ISBN : 9781400884261
Genre : History
File Size : 59.6 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 293
Read : 946

The Great Mississippi Flood of 1927, which covered nearly thirty thousand square miles across seven states, was the most destructive river flood in U.S. history. Due to the speed of new media and the slow progress of the flood, this was the first environmental disaster to be experienced on a mass scale. As it moved from north to south down an environmentally and technologically altered valley, inundating plantations and displacing more than half a million people, the flood provoked an intense and lasting cultural response. The Flood Year 1927 draws from newspapers, radio broadcasts, political cartoons, vaudeville, blues songs, poetry, and fiction to show how this event took on public meanings. Americans at first seemed united in what Herbert Hoover called a "great relief machine," but deep rifts soon arose. Southerners, pointing to faulty federal levee design, decried the attack of Yankee water. The condition of African American evacuees in “concentration camps” prompted pundits like W.E.B. Du Bois and Ida B. Wells to warn of the return of slavery to Dixie. And environmentalists like Gifford Pinchot called the flood “the most colossal blunder in civilized history.” Susan Scott Parrish examines how these and other key figures—from entertainers Will Rogers, Miller & Lyles, and Bessie Smith to authors Sterling Brown, William Faulkner, and Richard Wright—shaped public awareness and collective memory of the event. The crises of this period that usually dominate historical accounts are war and financial collapse, but The Flood Year 1927 enables us to assess how mediated environmental disasters became central to modern consciousness.
Category: History

Carry Me Home

Author : Diane McWhorter
ISBN : 9780743226486
Genre : History
File Size : 71.78 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 953
Read : 981

Now with a new afterword, the Pulitzer Prize-winning dramatic account of the civil rights era’s climactic battle in Birmingham as the movement, led by Martin Luther King, Jr., brought down the institutions of segregation. "The Year of Birmingham," 1963, was a cataclysmic turning point in America’s long civil rights struggle. Child demonstrators faced down police dogs and fire hoses in huge nonviolent marches against segregation. Ku Klux Klansmen retaliated by bombing the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church, killing four young black girls. Diane McWhorter, daughter of a prominent Birmingham family, weaves together police and FBI records, archival documents, interviews with black activists and Klansmen, and personal memories into an extraordinary narrative of the personalities and events that brought about America’s second emancipation. In a new afterword—reporting last encounters with hero Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth and describing the current drastic anti-immigration laws in Alabama—the author demonstrates that Alabama remains a civil rights crucible.
Category: History