RIGHTWARD BOUND

Download Rightward Bound ebook PDF or Read Online books in PDF, EPUB, and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to RIGHTWARD BOUND book pdf for free now.

Rightward Bound

Author : Bruce J. Schulman
ISBN : 0674027574
Genre : History
File Size : 53.89 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 164
Read : 1109

Often considered a lost decade, a pause between the liberal Sixties and Reaganâe(tm)s Eighties, the 1970s were indeed a watershed era when the forces of a conservative counter-revolution cohered. These years marked a significant moral and cultural turning point in which the conservative movement became the motive force driving politics for the ensuing three decades. Interpreting the movement as more than a backlash against the rampant liberalization of American culture, racial conflict, the Vietnam War, and Watergate, these provocative and innovative essays look below the surface, discovering the tectonic shifts that paved the way for Reaganâe(tm)s America. They reveal strains at the heart of the liberal coalition, resulting from struggles over jobs, taxes, and neighborhood reconstruction, while also investigating how the deindustrialization of northern cities, the rise of the suburbs, and the migration of people and capital to the Sunbelt helped conservatism gain momentum in the twentieth century. They demonstrate how the forces of the right coalesced in the 1970s and became, through the efforts of grassroots activists and political elites, a movement to reshape American values and policies. A penetrating and provocative portrait of a critical decade in American history, Rightward Bound illuminates the seeds of both the successes and the failures of the conservative revolution. It helps us understand how, despite conservatismâe(tm)s rise, persistent tensions remain today between its political power and the achievements of twentieth-century liberalism.
Category: History

Rightward Bound

Author : Bruce J. Schulman
ISBN : 0674027582
Genre : History
File Size : 75.98 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 996
Read : 975

Often considered a lost decade, a pause between the liberal Sixties and Reagan s Eighties, the 1970s were indeed a watershed era when the forces of a conservative counter-revolution cohered. A critical decade in American history, "Rightward Bound" illuminates the seeds of both the successes and the failures of the conservative revolution.
Category: History

Dark Money

Author : Jane Mayer
ISBN : 9780307947901
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 85.44 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 836
Read : 1169

Why is America living in an age of profound economic inequality? Why, despite the desperate need to address climate change, have even modest environmental efforts been defeated again and again? Why have protections for employees been decimated? Why do hedge-fund billionaires pay a far lower tax rate than middle-class workers? --Publisher.
Category: Political Science

Debating The American Conservative Movement

Author : Donald T. Critchlow
ISBN : 9780742548237
Genre : History
File Size : 36.85 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 660
Read : 1058

Debating the American Conservative Movement chronicles one of the most dramatic stories of modern American political history. The authors describe how a small band of conservatives in the immediate aftermath of the Second World War launched a revolution that shifted American politics to the right, challenged the New Deal order, transformed the Republican party into a voice of conservatism, and set the terms of debate in American politics as the country entered the new millennium. Historians Donald T. Critchlow and Nancy MacLean frame two opposing perspectives of how the history of conservatism in modern America can be understood, but readers are encouraged to reach their own conclusions through reading engaging primary documents.
Category: History

Uncertain Justice

Author : Laurence Tribe
ISBN : 9780805099133
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 46.10 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 101
Read : 837

With the Supreme Court more influential than ever, this eye-opening book tells the story of how the Roberts Court is shaking the foundation of our nation's laws From Citizens United to its momentous rulings regarding Obamacare and gay marriage, the Supreme Court under Chief Justice John Roberts has profoundly affected American life. Yet the court remains a mysterious institution, and the motivations of the nine men and women who serve for life are often obscure. Now, in Uncertain Justice, Laurence Tribe and Joshua Matz show the surprising extent to which the Roberts Court is revising the meaning of our Constitution. This essential book arrives at a make-or-break moment for the nation and the court. Political gridlock, cultural change, and technological progress mean that the court's decisions on key topics—including free speech, privacy, voting rights, and presidential power—could be uniquely durable. Acutely aware of their opportunity, the justices are rewriting critical aspects of constitutional law and redrawing the ground rules of American government. Tribe—one of the country's leading constitutional lawyers—and Matz dig deeply into the court's recent rulings, stepping beyond tired debates over judicial "activism" to draw out hidden meanings and silent battles. The undercurrents they reveal suggest a strikingly different vision for the future of our country, one that is sure to be hotly debated. Filled with original insights and compelling human stories, Uncertain Justice illuminates the most colorful story of all—how the Supreme Court and the Constitution frame the way we live.
Category: Political Science

Building Red America

Author : Thomas B. Edsall
ISBN : 9780465018161
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 88.78 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 379
Read : 466

This is a masterful-and disturbing-work of political journalism that challenges all of us to wake up and take heed
Category: Political Science

To Serve God And Wal Mart

Author : Bethany Moreton
ISBN : 9780674054295
Genre : Business & Economics
File Size : 34.13 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 494
Read : 1313

This extraordinary biography of Wal-Mart's world shows how a Christian pro-business movement grew from the bottom up as well as the top down, bolstering an economic vision that sanctifies corporate globalization.
Category: Business & Economics

Wives Mothers The Red Menace

Author : Mary Brennan
ISBN : 9781457109904
Genre : History
File Size : 87.77 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 459
Read : 762

In Wives, Mothers, and the Red Menace, Mary Brennan examines conservative women's anti-communist activism in the years immediately after World War II. Brennan details the actions and experiences of prominent anti-communists Jean Kerr McCarthy, Margaret Chase Smith, Freda Utley, Doloris Thauwald Bridges, Elizabeth Churchill Brown, and Phyllis Stewart Schlafly. She describes the Cold War context in which these women functioned and the ways in which women saw communism as a very real danger to domestic security and American families. Millions of women, Brennan notes, expanded their notions of household responsibilities to include the crusade against communism. From writing letters and hosting teas to publishing books and running for political office, they campaigned against communism and, incidentally, discovered the power they had to effect change through activism. Brennan reveals how the willingness of these deeply conservative women to leave the domestic sphere and engage publicly in politics evinces the depth of America's postwar fear of communism. She further argues that these conservative, anti-communist women pushed the boundaries of traditional gender roles and challenged assumptions about women as political players by entering political life to publicly promote their ideals. Wives, Mothers, and the Red Menace offers a fascinating analysis of gender and politics at a critical point in American history. Brennan's work will instigate discussions among historians, political scientists, and scholars of women's studies.
Category: History

From The Center To The Edge

Author : William C. Berman
ISBN : 9780585382999
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 47.50 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 343
Read : 1155

From the Center to the Edge is the first historical interpretation of the politics and public policies of the Clinton administration. Eminent political historian William C. Berman describes in penetrating detail the origins, evolution, and transformation of Clinton's programs for change as well as the reasons for its various successes and failures. Berman sheds new light on both domestic matters—such as welfare reform, deficit reduction, and the impeachment process—and key foreign policy issues, including American relations with Russia and China, and the conflicts in Bosnia and Kosovo. From the Center to the Edge provides a balanced but critical perspective of the Clinton administration, and is strongly recommended for anyone interested in presidential politics and recent American history.
Category: Political Science

Kitchen Table Politics

Author : Stacie Taranto
ISBN : 9780812293852
Genre : History
File Size : 36.83 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 143
Read : 630

Most histories of modern American politics tell a similar story: that the Sunbelt, with its business friendly environment, right-to-work laws, and fierce spirit of frontier individualism, provided the seedbed for popular conservatism. Stacie Taranto challenges this narrative by positioning New York State as a central battleground. In 1970, under the governorship of Republican Nelson Rockefeller, New York became one of the first states to legalize abortion. By 1980, however, conservative, antifeminist Republicans with broad suburban appeal—symbolized by figures such as Ronald Reagan—had usurped power from these so-called Rockefeller Republicans. What happened during the intervening decade? In Kitchen Table Politics, Taranto investigates the role that middle-class, mostly Catholic women played both in the development of conservatism in New York State and in the national shift toward a conservative politics of "family values." Far from Albany, a short train ride away from the feminist activity in New York City, white, Catholic homemakers on Long Island and in surrounding suburban counties saw the legalization of abortion in the state in 1970 as a threat to their hard-won version of the American dream. Borrowing tactics from church groups and parent-teacher associations, these women created the New York State Right to Life Party and organized against several feminist initiatives, including defeating an effort to add an Equal Rights Amendment to the state constitution in 1975. These self-described "average housewives," Taranto argues, were more than just conservative shock troops; instead, they were inventing a new, politically viable conservatism centered on the heterosexual traditional nuclear family that the GOP's right wing used to broaden its electoral base. Figures such as activist Phyllis Schafly, New York senator Al D'Amato, and presidential hopeful Ronald Reagan viewed the Right to Life Party's activism as offering a viable model to defeat feminist initiatives and win family values votes nationwide. Taranto gathers archival evidence and oral histories to piece together the story of these homemakers, whose grassroots organizing would shape the course of modern American conservatism.
Category: History