RETHINKING EXPERTISE

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Rethinking Expertise

Author : Harry Collins
ISBN : 9780226113623
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 38.21 MB
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What does it mean to be an expert? In Rethinking Expertise, Harry Collins and Robert Evans offer a radical new perspective on the role of expertise in the practice of science and the public evaluation of technology. Collins and Evans present a Periodic Table of Expertises based on the idea of tacit knowledge—knowledge that we have but cannot explain. They then look at how some expertises are used to judge others, how laypeople judge between experts, and how credentials are used to evaluate them. Throughout, Collins and Evans ask an important question: how can the public make use of science and technology before there is consensus in the scientific community? This book has wide implications for public policy and for those who seek to understand science and benefit from it. “Starts to lay the groundwork for solving a critical problem—how to restore the force of technical scientific information in public controversies, without importing disguised political agendas.”—Nature “A rich and detailed ‘periodic table’ of expertise . . . full of case studies, anecdotes and intriguing experiments.”—Times Higher Education Supplement (UK)
Category: Social Science

Should The C4d Expert Survive Rethinking Expertise In Communication And Innovation

Author :
ISBN : OCLC:1053739576
Genre :
File Size : 66.41 MB
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ABSTRACT: The notion of expertise in communication for development (C4D) is a complicated matter. While C4D is ideally framed as inter-disciplinary, this comes into conflict with the need to define and maintain boundaries around C4D expertise within organisations and agencies. In this viewpoint these tensions are unpacked with reference to recent ethnographies of aid and development institutions, and expanded upon by a reflection on intersections between C4D and the rising interest in innovation for development. The viewpoint proposes "communication for innovation", or "communicative innovation" as an urgent new research agenda for C4D.
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Rethinking Journalism Again

Author : Chris Peters
ISBN : 9781317506416
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 62.73 MB
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It’s easy to make a rhetorical case for the value of journalism. Because, it is a necessary precondition for democracy; it speaks to the people and for the people; it informs citizens and enables them to make rational decisions; it functions as their watchdog on government and other powers that be. But does rehashing such familiar rationales bring journalism studies forward? Does it contribute to ongoing discussions surrounding journalism’s viability going forth? For all their seeming self-evidence, this book considers what bearing these old platitudes have in the new digital era. It asks whether such hopeful talk really reflects the concrete roles journalism now performs for people in their everyday lives. In essence, it poses questions that strike at the core of the idea of journalism itself. Is there a singular journalism that has one well-defined role in society? Is its public mandate as strong as we think? The internationally-renowned scholars comprising the collection address these recurring concerns that have long-defined the profession and which journalism faces even more acutely today. By discussing what journalism was, is, and (possibly) will be, this book highlights key contemporary areas of debate and tackles on-going anxieties about its future.
Category: Social Science

Citizens Experts And The Environment

Author : Frank Fischer
ISBN : 9780822380283
Genre : Science
File Size : 32.81 MB
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The tension between professional expertise and democratic governance has become increasingly significant in Western politics. Environmental politics in particular is a hotbed for citizens who actively challenge the imposition of expert theories that ignore forms of local knowledge that can help to relate technical facts to social values. Where information ideologues see the modern increase in information as capable of making everyone smarter, others see the emergence of a society divided between those with and those without knowledge. Suggesting realistic strategies to bridge this divide, Fischer calls for meaningful nonexpert involvement in policymaking and shows how the deliberations of ordinary citizens can help solve complex social and environmental problems by contributing local contextual knowledge to the professionals’ expertise. While incorporating theoretical critiques of positivism and methodology, he also offers hard evidence to demonstrate that the ordinary citizen is capable of a great deal more participation than is generally recognized. Popular epidemiology in the United States, the Danish consensus conference, and participatory resource mapping in India serve as examples of the type of inquiry he proposes, showing how the local knowledge of citizens is invaluable to policy formation. In his conclusion Fischer examines the implications of the approach for participatory democracy and the democratization of contemporary deliberative structures. This study will interest political scientists, public policy practitioners, sociologists, scientists, environmentalists, political activists, urban planners, and public administrators along with those interested in understanding the relationship between democracy and science in a modern technological society.
Category: Science

Inevitably Toxic

Author : Brinda Sarathy
ISBN : 9780822986232
Genre : Science
File Size : 76.70 MB
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Not a day goes by that humans aren’t exposed to toxins in our environment—be it at home, in the car, or workplace. But what about those toxic places and items that aren’t marked? Why are we warned about some toxic spaces' substances and not others? The essays in Inevitably Toxic consider the exposure of bodies in the United States, Canada and Japan to radiation, industrial waste, and pesticides. Research shows that appeals to uncertainty have led to social inaction even when evidence, e.g. the link between carbon emissions and global warming, stares us in the face. In some cases, influential scientists, engineers and doctors have deliberately "manufactured doubt" and uncertainty but as the essays in this collection show, there is often no deliberate deception. We tend to think that if we can’t see contamination and experts deem it safe, then we are okay. Yet, having knowledge about the uncertainty behind expert claims can awaken us from a false sense of security and alert us to decisions and practices that may in fact cause harm.
Category: Science

Tacit And Explicit Knowledge

Author : Harry Collins
ISBN : 9780226113821
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 68.47 MB
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Much of what humans know we cannot say. And much of what we do we cannot describe. For example, how do we know how to ride a bike when we can’t explain how we do it? Abilities like this were called “tacit knowledge” by physical chemist and philosopher Michael Polanyi, but here Harry Collins analyzes the term, and the behavior, in much greater detail, often departing from Polanyi’s treatment. In Tacit and Explicit Knowledge, Collins develops a common conceptual language to bridge the concept’s disparate domains by explaining explicit knowledge and classifying tacit knowledge. Collins then teases apart the three very different meanings, which, until now, all fell under the umbrella of Polanyi’s term: relational tacit knowledge (things we could describe in principle if someone put effort into describing them), somatic tacit knowledge (things our bodies can do but we cannot describe how, like balancing on a bike), and collective tacit knowledge (knowledge we draw that is the property of society, such as the rules for language). Thus, bicycle riding consists of some somatic tacit knowledge and some collective tacit knowledge, such as the knowledge that allows us to navigate in traffic. The intermixing of the three kinds of tacit knowledge has led to confusion in the past; Collins’s book will at last unravel the complexities of the idea. Tacit knowledge drives everything from language, science, education, and management to sport, bicycle riding, art, and our interaction with technology. In Collins’s able hands, it also functions at last as a framework for understanding human behavior in a range of disciplines.
Category: Social Science

Too Big To Know

Author : David Weinberger
ISBN : 3456852355
Genre :
File Size : 48.28 MB
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Zero Comments

Author : Geert Lovink
ISBN : 9783839408049
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 58.2 MB
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In diesem dritten Band seiner kritischen Studien zur Internetkultur hinterfragt Geert Lovink den jüngsten »Web 2.0«-Hype um Blogs, Wikis oder Netzgemeinschaften. Anstatt den »Bürger-Journalismus« zu idealisieren, untersucht der Autor den »nihilistischen Impuls« der Blogs, etablierte Bedeutungsstrukturen auszuhöhlen und - voller Stolz auf ihren Insider-Charakter - das Verlinken, Indexieren und Ranking zum Hauptantrieb zu erheben. Darüber hinaus behandelt das Buch die stille Globalisierung des Internets, in der nicht mehr der Westen, sondern Länder wie Indien, China und Brasilien sich zu einflussreichen Akteuren entwickeln. Ein weiterer Schwerpunkt ist die Revision des Theoriebestands: Geert Lovink aktualisiert überholte Konzepte wie die der Globalen Internet-Zeit, der Taktischen Medien oder der Krise der Medienkunst und widmet sich dem schwierigen Verhältnis zwischen Architektur und Netz. Das Buch schließt mit spekulativen Bemerkungen zu Modellen wie Organisierte Netzwerke, Freie Kooperation und Verteilte Ästhetik.
Category: Social Science

The Limits Of Expertise

Author : R. Key Dismukes
ISBN : 9781351886697
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 21.25 MB
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Why would highly skilled, well-trained pilots make errors that lead to accidents when they had safely completed many thousands of previous flights? The majority of all aviation accidents are attributed primarily to human error, but this is often misinterpreted as evidence of lack of skill, vigilance, or conscientiousness of the pilots. The Limits of Expertise is a fresh look at the causes of pilot error and aviation accidents, arguing that accidents can be understood only in the context of how the overall aviation system operates. The authors analyzed in great depth the 19 major U.S. airline accidents from 1991-2000 in which the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) found crew error to be a causal factor. Each accident is reviewed in a separate chapter that examines events and crew actions and explores the cognitive processes in play at each step. The approach is guided by extensive evidence from cognitive psychology that human skill and error are opposite sides of the same coin. The book examines the ways in which competing task demands, ambiguity and organizational pressures interact with cognitive processes to make all experts vulnerable to characteristic forms of error. The final chapter identifies themes cutting across the accidents, discusses the role of chance, criticizes simplistic concepts of causality of accidents, and suggests ways to reduce vulnerability to these catastrophes. The authors' complementary experience allowed a unique approach to the study: accident investigation with the NTSB, cognitive psychology research both in the lab and in the field, enormous first-hand experience of piloting, and application of aviation psychology in both civil and military operations. This combination allowed the authors to examine and explain the domain-specific aspects of aviation operations and to extend advances in basic research in cognition to complex issues of human performance in the real world. Although The Limits of Expertise is directed to aviation operations, the implications are clear for understanding the decision processes, skilled performance and errors of professionals in many domains, including medicine.
Category: Political Science

Rethinking The Mathematics Curriculum

Author : Celia Hoyles
ISBN : 9781135701062
Genre : Education
File Size : 82.86 MB
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At a time when political interest in mathematics education is at its highest, this book demonstrates that the issues are far from straightforward. A wide range of international contributors address such questions as: What is mathematics, and what is it for? What skills does mathematics education need to provide as technology advances? What are the implications for teacher education? What can we learn from past attempts to change the mathematics curriculum? Rethinking the Mathematics Curriculum offers stimulating discussions, showing much is to be learnt from the differences in culture, national expectations, and political restraints revealed in the book. This accessible book will be of particular interest to policy makers, curriculum developers, educators, researchers and employers as well as the general reader.
Category: Education