RACE AND THE SHAPING OF TWENTIETH CENTURY ATLANTA

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Race And The Shaping Of Twentieth Century Atlanta

Author : Ronald H. Bayor
ISBN : 0807848980
Genre : History
File Size : 28.59 MB
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Offering the first comprehensive history of Atlanta race relations, Ronald Bayor discusses the impact of racial bias on physical and institutional development of the city from the end of the Civil War through the mayorship of Andrew Young in the 1980s. Bayor explores frequently ignored policy issues through the lens of race--including hospital care, highway placement and development, police and fire services, schools, and park use, as well as housing patterns and employment.
Category: History

Atlanta

Author : Larry Keating
ISBN : 9781439904497
Genre : Business & Economics
File Size : 88.9 MB
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Troubling stories about private interests over public development in Atlanta.
Category: Business & Economics

Veiled Visions

Author : David Fort Godshalk
ISBN : 9780807876848
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 50.42 MB
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In 1906 Atlanta, after a summer of inflammatory headlines and accusations of black-on-white sexual assaults, armed white mobs attacked African Americans, resulting in at least twenty-five black fatalities. Atlanta's black residents fought back and repeatedly defended their neighborhoods from white raids. Placing this four-day riot in a broader narrative of twentieth-century race relations in Atlanta, in the South, and in the United States, David Fort Godshalk examines the riot's origins and how memories of this cataclysmic event shaped black and white social and political life for decades to come. Nationally, the riot radicalized many civil rights leaders, encouraging W. E. B. Du Bois's confrontationist stance and diminishing the accommodationist voice of Booker T. Washington. In Atlanta, fears of continued disorder prompted white civic leaders to seek dialogue with black elites, establishing a rare biracial tradition that convinced mainstream northern whites that racial reconciliation was possible in the South without national intervention. Paired with black fears of renewed violence, however, this interracial cooperation exacerbated black social divisions and repeatedly undermined black social justice movements, leaving the city among the most segregated and socially stratified in the nation. Analyzing the interwoven struggles of men and women, blacks and whites, social outcasts and national powerbrokers, Godshalk illuminates the possibilities and limits of racial understanding and social change in twentieth-century America.
Category: Social Science

Race And Ethnicity In America

Author : Ronald H. Bayor
ISBN : 0231129408
Genre : History
File Size : 42.5 MB
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Provides a chronological history of immigration, race, and ethnicity in the United States from 1600 to 2000, covering such topics as migration, intergroup relations, identity formation, and nativism.
Category: History

Imagineering Atlanta

Author : Charles Rutheiser
ISBN : 1859841457
Genre : History
File Size : 31.56 MB
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Chronicles the city's efforts to create a sense of "traditional urbanity" and bolster the economy and culture of the city's core in the face of racialized topography in preparation for the Olympic games
Category: History

Roaring Metropolis

Author : Daniel Amsterdam
ISBN : 9780812292732
Genre : Business & Economics
File Size : 50.84 MB
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Debates about poverty and inequality in the United States frequently invoke the early twentieth century as a time when new social legislation helped moderate corporate power. But as historian Daniel Amsterdam shows, the relationship between business interests and the development of American government was hardly so simple. Roaring Metropolis reconstructs the ideas and activism of urban capitalists roughly a century ago. Far from antigovernment stalwarts, business leaders in cities across the country often advocated extensive government spending on an array of social programs. They championed public schooling, public health, the construction of libraries, museums, parks, and playgrounds, and decentralized cities filled with freestanding homes—a set of initiatives that they believed would foster political stability and economic growth during an era of explosive, often chaotic, urban expansion. The efforts of businessmen on this front had deep historical roots but bore the most fruit during the 1920s, an era often misconstrued as an antigovernment moment. As Daniel Amsterdam illustrates, public spending soared across urban America during the decade due in part to businessmen's political activism. With a focus on three different cities—Detroit, Philadelphia, and Atlanta—and a host of political groups—organized labor, machine politicians, African American and immigrant activists, middle-class women's groups, and the Ku Klux Klan—Roaring Metropolis traces businessmen's quest to build cities and nurture an urban citizenry friendly to capitalism and the will of urban capitalists.
Category: Business & Economics

Racial Beachhead

Author : Carol Lynn McKibben
ISBN : 9780804778442
Genre : History
File Size : 90.44 MB
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In 1917, Fort Ord was established in the tiny subdivision of Seaside, California. Over the course of the 20th century, it held great national and military importance—a major launching point for World War II operations, the first base in the military to undergo complete integration, the West Coast's most important training base for draftees in the Vietnam War, a site of important civil rights movements—until its closure in the 1990s. Alongside it, the city of Seaside took form. Racial Beachhead offers the story of this city, shaped over the decades by military policies of racial integration in the context of the ideals of the American civil rights movement. Middle class blacks, together with other military families—black, white, Hispanic, and Asian—created a local politics of inclusion that continues to serve as a reminder that integration can work to change ideas about race. Though Seaside's relationship with the military makes it unique, at the same time the story of Seaside is part and parcel of the story of 20th century American town life. Its story contributes to the growing history of cities of color—those minority-majority places that are increasingly the face of urban America.
Category: History

Beyond Atlanta

Author : Stephen G. N. Tuck
ISBN : 0820322652
Genre : History
File Size : 57.25 MB
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"Beyond Atlanta draws on interviews with almost two hundred people - black and white - who worked for, or actively resisted, the freedom movement. Among the topics Stephen Tuck covers are the absence of consistent support from the movement's national leadership and the frustration and innovation it alternately inspired at the local level. In addition, Tuck reveals friction along urban-rural and poor-prosperous lines about movement goals and tactics, and he highlights the often unheralded roles played by African American women, veterans, masons, unions, neighborhood clubs, and local NAACP branches."--BOOK JACKET.
Category: History

Benjamin Elijah Mays Schoolmaster Of The Movement

Author : Randal Maurice Jelks
ISBN : 9780807869871
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 74.56 MB
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In this first full-length biography of Benjamin Mays (1894-1984), Randal Maurice Jelks chronicles the life of the man Martin Luther King Jr. called his "spiritual and intellectual father." Dean of the Howard University School of Religion, president of Morehouse College, and mentor to influential black leaders, Mays had a profound impact on the education of the leadership of the black church and of a generation of activists, policymakers, and educators. Jelks argues that Mays's ability to connect the message of Christianity with the responsibility to challenge injustice prepared the black church for its pivotal role in the civil rights movement. From Mays's humble origins in Epworth, South Carolina, through his doctoral education, his work with institutions such as the National Urban League, the NAACP, and the national YMCA movement, and his significant career in academia, Jelks creates a rich portrait of the man, the teacher, and the scholar. Benjamin Elijah Mays, Schoolmaster of the Movement is a powerful portrayal of one man's faith, thought, and mentorship in bringing American apartheid to an end.
Category: Biography & Autobiography