RACE AND RACISMS A CRITICAL APPROACH

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Race And Racisms

Author : Tanya Maria Golash-Boza
ISBN : 0190663782
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 68.39 MB
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Revised edition of the author's Race & racisms, [2015]
Category: Social Science

Race And Racisms

Author : Tanya Maria Golash-Boza
ISBN : 019992001X
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 72.55 MB
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Race and Racisms: A Critical Approach engages students in significant questions related to racial dynamics in the U.S. and around the world. Written in accessible, straightforward language, the book discusses and critically analyzes cutting-edge scholarship in the field. Organized into topics and concepts rather than discrete racial groups, the text addresses: * How and when the idea of race was created and developed * How structural racism has worked historically to reproduce inequality * How we have a society rampant with racial inequality, even though most people do not consider themselves to be racist * How race, class, and gender work together to create inequality and identities * How immigration policy in the United States has been racialized * How racial justice could be imagined and realized Centrally focused on racial dynamics, Race and Racisms also incorporates an intersectional perspective, discussing the intersections of racism, patriarchy, and capitalism.
Category: Social Science

Race And Racisms

Author : Tanya Maria Golash-Boza
ISBN : 019023850X
Genre : Equality
File Size : 77.29 MB
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Category: Equality

Ethnic Studies

Author : Philip Q. Yang
ISBN : 0791444805
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 73.93 MB
Format : PDF
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Defines the field of ethnic studies and explores its methodologies.
Category: Social Science

Fatal Invention

Author : Dorothy Roberts
ISBN : 9781595586919
Genre : Science
File Size : 30.98 MB
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An incisive, groundbreaking book that examines how a biological concept of race is a myth that promotes inequality in a supposedly “post-racial” era. Though the Human Genome Project proved that human beings are not naturally divided by race, the emerging fields of personalized medicine, reproductive technologies, genetic genealogy, and DNA databanks are attempting to resuscitate race as a biological category written in our genes. This groundbreaking book by legal scholar and social critic Dorothy Roberts examines how the myth of race as a biological concept—revived by purportedly cutting-edge science, race-specific drugs, genetic testing, and DNA databases—continues to undermine a just society and promote inequality in a supposedly “post-racial” era. Named one of the ten best black nonfiction books 2011 by AFRO.com, Fatal Invention offers a timely and “provocative analysis” (Nature) of race, science, and politics that “is consistently lucid . . . alarming but not alarmist, controversial but evidential, impassioned but rational” (Publishers Weekly, starred review). “Everyone concerned about social justice in America should read this powerful book.” —Anthony D. Romero, executive director, American Civil Liberties Union “A terribly important book on how the ‘fatal invention’ has terrifying effects in the post-genomic, ‘post-racial’ era.” —Eduardo Bonilla-Silva, professor of sociology, Duke University, and author of Racism Without Racists: Color-Blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in the United States “Fatal Invention is a triumph! Race has always been an ill-defined amalgam of medical and cultural bias, thinly overlaid with the trappings of contemporary scientific thought. And no one has peeled back the layers of assumption and deception as lucidly as Dorothy Roberts.” —Harriet A. Washington, author of and Deadly Monopolies: The Shocking Corporate Takeover of Life Itself
Category: Science

Forced Out And Fenced In

Author : Tanya Maria Golash-Boza
ISBN : 019063345X
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 77.2 MB
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"An anthology of essays by migration scholars telling fieldwork-based stories of those affected by U.S. immigration law enforcement"--
Category: Social Science

More Beautiful And More Terrible

Author : Imani Perry
ISBN : 9780814767368
Genre : Law
File Size : 70.91 MB
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For a nation that often optimistically claims to be post-racial, we are still mired in the practices of racial inequality that plays out in law, policy, and in our local communities. One of two explanations is often given for this persistent phenomenon: On the one hand, we might be hypocritical—saying one thing, and doing or believing another; on the other, it might have little to do with us individually but rather be inherent to the structure of American society. More Beautiful and More Terrible compels us to think beyond this insufficient dichotomy in order to see how racial inequality is perpetuated. Imani Perry asserts that the U.S. is in a new and distinct phase of racism that is “post-intentional”: neither based on the intentional discrimination of the past, nor drawing upon biological concepts of race. Drawing upon the insights and tools of critical race theory, social policy, law, sociology and cultural studies, she demonstrates how post-intentional racism works and maintains that it cannot be addressed solely through the kinds of structural solutions of the Left or the values arguments of the Right. Rather, the author identifies a place in the middle—a space of “righteous hope”—and articulates a notion of ethics and human agency that will allow us to expand and amplify that hope. To paraphrase James Baldwin, when talking about race, it is both more terrible than most think, but also more beautiful than most can imagine, with limitless and open-ended possibility. Perry leads readers down the path of imagining the possible and points to the way forward.
Category: Law

Getting Real About Race

Author : Stephanie M. McClure
ISBN : 9781506339320
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 81.84 MB
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Getting Real About Race is an edited collection of short essays that address the most common stereotypes and misconceptions about race held by students, and by many in the United States, in general.
Category: Social Science

Racism Without Racists

Author : Eduardo Bonilla-Silva
ISBN : 9781442276246
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 38.5 MB
Format : PDF
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Eduardo Bonilla-Silva’s acclaimed Racism without Racists is a provocative book that explodes the belief that America is now a color-blind society. The fifth edition includes a new chapter addressing what readers can do to confront racism, new material on the racial climate post-Obama, new coverage of the Black Lives Matter movement, and more.
Category: Social Science

Anthropology And The Racial Politics Of Culture

Author : Lee D. Baker
ISBN : 9780822392699
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 55.42 MB
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In the late nineteenth century, if ethnologists in the United States recognized African American culture, they often perceived it as something to be overcome and left behind. At the same time, they were committed to salvaging “disappearing” Native American culture by curating objects, narrating practices, and recording languages. In Anthropology and the Racial Politics of Culture, Lee D. Baker examines theories of race and culture developed by American anthropologists during the late nineteenth century and early twentieth. He investigates the role that ethnologists played in creating a racial politics of culture in which Indians had a culture worthy of preservation and exhibition while African Americans did not. Baker argues that the concept of culture developed by ethnologists to understand American Indian languages and customs in the nineteenth century formed the basis of the anthropological concept of race eventually used to confront “the Negro problem” in the twentieth century. As he explores the implications of anthropology’s different approaches to African Americans and Native Americans, and the field’s different but overlapping theories of race and culture, Baker delves into the careers of prominent anthropologists and ethnologists, including James Mooney Jr., Frederic W. Putnam, Daniel G. Brinton, and Franz Boas. His analysis takes into account not only scientific societies, journals, museums, and universities, but also the development of sociology in the United States, African American and Native American activists and intellectuals, philanthropy, the media, and government entities from the Bureau of Indian Affairs to the Supreme Court. In Anthropology and the Racial Politics of Culture, Baker tells how anthropology has both responded to and helped shape ideas about race and culture in the United States, and how its ideas have been appropriated (and misappropriated) to wildly different ends.
Category: Social Science