Portsmouth Naval Prison

Author : Katy Kramer
ISBN : 9781467116671
Genre : History
File Size : 66.69 MB
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The Portsmouth Naval Prison, now vacant, sits at the far end of the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard on Seavey Island on the Maine and New Hampshire border. For over a century, "the Castle" or "the Rock," with its deceptively appealing exterior, has kept both visitors and New Hampshire residents in its thrall. Since its opening in 1908 to its decommissioning in 1974 and into the present day, myth and lore have surrounded this iconic building. For the 66 years it functioned, any prisoner who escaped was brought back dead or alive--or so it has been said. Only adding to the prison's mystique is its history of reform; particularly successful were the wartime restoration and rehabilitation programs. Although the prison's fearsome reputation is cemented in Darryl Ponicsan's The Last Detail, Portsmouth was a forerunner in many ways. Routine inside often reflected the latest advancements in the field. Yet, designed or deserved, the prison's legacy remains an intriguing mix of dread and redemption.
Category: History

Portsmouth Harbor S Military And Naval Heritage

Author : Nelson H. Lawry
ISBN : 9781439632079
Genre : History
File Size : 90.10 MB
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Including more than two hundred vintage photographs and illustrations, Portsmouth Harbor’s Military and Naval Heritage chronicles the history of the Piscataqua River’s naval shipyard and harbor defenses. Long before it became home to one of the U.S. Navy’s first federal shipyards, the harbor at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, and Kittery, Maine, was protected by gun batteries, mainly at Fort Point, New Castle, New Hampshire. By the end of World War II, modern concrete batteries mounting guns of ever longer range had been constructed at this and three other forts straddling the river’s mouth. These fortifications reflected the increasingly important role of the shipyard, dedicated after 1917 to building submarines that contributed significantly to the World War II victory.
Category: History

The Big House

Author : Stephen D. Cox
ISBN : 9780300154955
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 53.29 MB
Format : PDF
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""The Big House" is America's idea of the prison - a huge, tough, ostentatiously oppressive pile of rock, bristling with rules and punishments, overwhelming in size and the intent to intimidate. Stephen Cox tells the story of the American prison - its politics, its sex, its violence, its inability to control itself - and its idealization in American popular culture. This book investigates both the popular images of prison and the realities behind them : problems of control and discipline, mainenance and reform, power and sexuality. It conveys an awareness of the limits of human and institutional power, and of the symbolic and iconic qualities the "Big House" has attained in America's understanding of itself"--Jacket.
Category: Social Science

Carceral Fantasies

Author : Alison Griffiths
ISBN : 9780231541565
Genre : Performing Arts
File Size : 71.23 MB
Format : PDF
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A groundbreaking contribution to the study of non-theatrical film exhibition, Carceral Fantasies tells the little-known story of how cinema found a home in the U.S. penitentiary system and how the prison emerged as a setting and narrative trope in modern cinema. Focusing on films shown in prisons before 1935, the book explores the unique experience of viewing cinema while incarcerated and the complex cultural roots of cinematic renderings of prison life. Considering a diverse mix of cinematic genres, from early actualities and reenactments of notorious executions to reformist exposés of the 1920s, Carceral Fantasies illuminates how filmic representations of the penal system enacted ideas about modernity, gender, and the public, providing a surprising account of how incarceration shaped the social experience of cinema.
Category: Performing Arts

Whips To Walls

Author : Rodney Watterson
ISBN : 9781612514468
Genre : History
File Size : 62.79 MB
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During World War I, the United States Navy conducted at the Portsmouth, NH Naval Prison what many penal scholars consider the most ambitious experiment in the history of progressive prison reform. Cell doors remained opened, prisoners governed themselves and thousands of rehabilitated prisoners were returned to the fleet. This humanitarian experiment at Portsmouth prison stood in stark contrast to the inhumane flogging of prisoners that had dominated naval discipline until 1850. The Navy’s journey between these two extremes in naval discipline included the development of a much needed naval prison system. When congress abolished flogging in 1850, the Navy was left with few punishment options. Flogging had been a harsh, but very effective and efficient discipline tool. Various conditions of confinement appeared to be the most logical substitute for flogging, but the Navy had few cells ashore and confinement onboard a nineteenth century man-of-war sailing vessel was impractical. Onboard space was limited and all hands were needed to sail and fight the ship. Subsequent naval directives that merely suggested punishments for various offenses led to inconsistent interpretation and application of punishments throughout the fleet. At the same time, courts-martial prisoners were sporadically confined in various marine barracks, navy yard jails, naval station guard houses, prison ships and state prisons. The Navy’s discipline system was in disarray. A naval prison system was needed to consolidate and provide for consistent treatment of prisoners. The Navy’s efforts to gain congressional approval for a prison in the 1870s were unsuccessful. In the late 1880s, the Navy took matters into its own hands and established a prison system centered on makeshift prisons at the Boston and Mare Island Navy Yards. An ever-increasing need for cells, primarily driven by high desertion rates, eventually resulted in the construction of the Navy’s first real prison at Portsmouth, which opened in 1908. A consolidation of naval prisons in 1914 left Portsmouth as the dominant centerpiece of the naval prison system. At this point Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels and Assistant Secretary of the Navy Franklin Delano Roosevelt chose the most celebrated prison reformer of his era, Thomas Mott Osborne, to assume command of the Portsmouth prison. His reforms at Portsmouth went well until Vice Adm. William S. Sims and others became convinced that too many trouble makers were being returned to the fleet. Under mounting pressure from senior naval officers, FDR personally led an on-site investigation of conditions at Portsmouth prison, which included charges of gross mismanagement and rampant homosexual activity. Although exonerated by FDR’s team, Osborne resigned from the Navy shortly after the investigation. Osborne’s reform initiatives were quickly reversed as the Navy returned to a harsher punishment system more inclined toward deterrence than humanitarian considerations and prisoner comforts.
Category: History

Portsmouth

Author : Russell M. Lawson
ISBN : 0738524271
Genre : History
File Size : 71.83 MB
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PRIMARY COVERAGE AREA: Portsmouth, Dover, Greenland
Category: History

Frank Tannenbaum

Author : Matthew G. Yeager
ISBN : 9781317313397
Genre : Law
File Size : 49.60 MB
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Frank Tannenbaum and the Making of a Convict Criminologist is a historical biography about Columbia University professor Frank Tannenbaum and his contribution to American criminology. Tannenbaum was a major figure in criminology in the early twentieth century, and is known for his contributions to labeling theory, particularly his conception of the "dramatization of evil" presented in his 1938 book, Crime and Community. Tannenbaum served a year on Blackwell’s Island in New York City for labor disturbances in 1914 and subsequently became a prison reformer, writing about his experiences with the American penal system and serving as the official reporter for the Wickersham Commission’s study on Penal Institutions, Probation, and Parole in 1931. This book explores his unique early career, and his influence on convict criminology, drawing on his personal papers housed at the Butler Library at Columbia University.
Category: Law

Guts And Glory

Author : Lawrence H. Suid
ISBN : 9780813158082
Genre : History
File Size : 87.55 MB
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Guts and Glory: The Making of the American Military Image in Film is the definitive study of the symbiotic relationship between the film industry and the United States armed services. Since the first edition was published nearly two decades ago, the nation has experienced several wars, both on the battlefield and in movie theatres and living rooms at home. Now, author Lawrence Suid has extensively revised and expanded his classic history of the mutual exploitation of the film industry and the military, exploring how Hollywood has reflected and effected changes in America's image of its armed services. He offers in-depth looks at such classic films as Wings, Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo, The Longest Day, Patton, Top Gun, An Officer and a Gentleman, and Saving Private Ryan, as well as the controversial war movies The Green Berets, M*A*S*H, the Deer Hunter, Apocalypse Now, Platoon, Full Metal Jacket, and Born on the Fourth of July.
Category: History

A Brief History Of Oral Sex

Author : David DePierre
ISBN : 9781476630274
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 81.29 MB
Format : PDF
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The ancient Greeks and Romans considered it degrading to both parties yet depicted it prolifically in art and literature. The Early Christian Church called it “the worst evil,” punishable by seven years of penance and fasting (murder was one year). Nearly all of the 13 original American colonies had laws against it—except Georgia. A Victorian handbook for young brides advised how to “dampen his desire to kiss in forbidden territory.” Attitudes about oral sex have varied through the centuries and across cultures—a death sentence in some nations, a religious practice in others. This book explores its history as well as its impact on world events.
Category: Social Science