POISONOUS PLANTS A CULTURAL AND SOCIAL HISTORY

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Poisonous Plants

Author : Robert Bevan-Jones
ISBN : 9781909686229
Genre : Nature
File Size : 57.54 MB
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The botanical history of Britain and North West Europe has a dark and a light side. Plants have been used as weapons to harm people, taken deliberately as addictive drugs and also employed as tools in witchcraft and used as magical amulets. Yet many of these same plants have been medicinally vital to numerous European communities; as the author notes, frequently the only difference between a benevolent medicine and a poison is dosage. In this book, which is richly illustrated with modern colour photographs and illustrations from herbals, Robert Bevan-Jones brings together a wealth of documentary and archaeo-botanical sources to discuss the cultural, social (and anti-social) role of the fifty most significant species of poisonous plants and fungi found in Britain, either as natives or as introductions. An introductory essay puts into context the development of British society's knowledge of toxic plants: the 'cultural botany' applied in Britain today has evolved over thousands of years, absorbing information from European texts and importing useful plants from Europe, such as the mandrake. The book's central A to Z section - from aconite to yew - then informs the reader about the history and uses of 43 species of poisonous plants, especially those that have a documented history of medicinal usage. Four important fungi species - death cap, liberty cap, fly agaric and ergot - also have separate essays. As well as the plants' histories and appearance, their chemical constituents receive coverage; these give them powerful and diverse properties, which demand our admiration and respect. The book aims to add to the knowledge offered by field identification guides, and help reduce the risk associated with accidental ingestion. Case histories are given in as much detail as possible and the information will hopefully help the reader understand the properties of plants they may encounter, either in an archaeological, botanical or horticultural context. Most of these plants can yet be found growing in woodlands, parks, botanical gardens, roadsides, waterways, churchyards and abbey sites. This is an essential book not only for botanists and historical ecologists, but also for anyone interested in the toxic plant traditions of Britain and Europe.
Category: Nature

Poisonous Plants

Author : Elizabeth A. Dauncey
ISBN : STANFORD:36105215362224
Genre : Family & Relationships
File Size : 36.62 MB
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This accessible guidebook is the result of a long-standing collaboration between the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and the Medical Toxicology Information Services at Guy's and St Thomas' Hospital, London. Helpful descriptions and more than 230 photographs will assist you in identifying 130 of the most poisonous plants likely to be encountered as pot plants, in flower beds and vegetable plots, and in more natural environments. The toxins contained in each plant (especially in plant parts that are attractive to children) and the likely symptoms should they be inadvertently touched or eaten are explained. Poisonous Plants provides crucial information for anyone caring for children, and for educators, medics, sellers of plants and flowers, gardeners and those responsible for plants in public places. It will enable you to assess the potential risks posed to children by toxic plants and provides ideas for designing and planting a safe environment.
Category: Family & Relationships

Duchess Of Northumberland S Little Book Of Poisons Potions And Aphrodisiacs

Author : The Duchess of Northumberland
ISBN : 9780752497259
Genre : Gardening
File Size : 26.48 MB
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From the creator of the world-famous Poison Garden at Alnwick Castle Combining the fascinating archive of the first Duchess of Northumberland with the expertise of Jane, the present Duchess and the creator of the famous Poison Garden at Alnwick Castle, this illustrated gift book tells the story of the poison found within the plants that grow wild across Britain's countryside and the medicinal potions that derive from them. Based on the information gleaned from the Poison Garden and the Household Books of the first Duchess of Northumberland, the reader will learn the secrets, past and present, of the poisonous and curative properties of these plants and the more unusual varieties that have been cultivated and planted for centuries. Beautifully illustrated, this is the ideal gift for those with an interest in the wild plants of Britain and for those with an interest in poison and potions.
Category: Gardening

The Cultural History Of Plants

Author : Sir Ghillean Prance
ISBN : 9781135958114
Genre : Gardening
File Size : 47.40 MB
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This valuable reference will be useful for both scholars and general readers. It is both botanical and cultural, describing the role of plant in social life, regional customs, the arts, natural and covers all aspects of plant cultivation and migration and covers all aspects of plant cultivation and migration. The text includes an explanation of plant names and a list of general references on the history of useful plants.
Category: Gardening

The Ancient Yew

Author : Robert Bevan-Jones
ISBN : 9781911188148
Genre : Science
File Size : 79.32 MB
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The gnarled, immutable yew tree is one of the most evocative sights in the British and Irish language, an evergreen impression of immortality, the tree that provides a living botanical link between our own landscapes and those of the distant past. This book tells the extraordinary story of the yew’s role in the landscape through the millennia, and makes a convincing case for the origins of many of the oldest trees, as markers of the holy places founded by Celtic saints in the early medieval ‘Dark Ages’. With wonderful photographic portraits of ancient yews and a gazetteer (with locations) of the oldest yew trees in Britain, the book brings together for the first time all the evidence about the dating, history, archaeology and cultural connections of the yew. Robert Bevan-Jones discusses its history, biology, the origins of its name, the yew berry and its toxicity, its distribution across Britain, means of dating examples, and their association with folklore, with churchyards, abbeys, springs, pre-Reformation wells and as landscape markers. This third edition has an updated introduction with new photographs and corrections to the main text.
Category: Science

50 Poisonous Questions

Author : Tanya Lloyd Kyi
ISBN : 1554512816
Genre : Juvenile Nonfiction
File Size : 62.54 MB
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Presents facts about poisons found in plants and animals and those which are man-made, including how poisons can both harm and help humans.
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

A Poison Stronger Than Love

Author : Anastasia M. Shkilnyk
ISBN : 0300033257
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 75.94 MB
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This book documents the human costs of massive and extraordinarily rapid change in a people’s way of life. When well-intentioned bureaucrats relocated the Grassy Narrows band to a new reserve in 1963, the results were the unraveling of the tribe’s social fabric and a sharp deterioration in their personal morale - dramatically reflected in Shkilnyk’s statistics on violent death, illness, and family breakdown. The book explores the origins and causes of the suffering in the community life and describes the devastating impacts of mercury contamination on the health and livelihood of the Indian people.
Category: Social Science

The Origins Of Human Diet And Medicine

Author : Timothy Johns
ISBN : 0816516871
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 62.55 MB
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People have always been attracted to foods rich in calories, fat, and protein; yet the biblical admonition that meat be eaten "with bitter herbs" suggests that unpalatable plants play an important role in our diet. So-called primitive peoples show a surprisingly sophisticated understanding of how their bodies interact with plant chemicals, which may allow us to rediscover the origins of diet by retracing the paths of biology and culture. The domestication of the potato serves as the focus of Timothy Johns's interdisciplinary study, which forges a bold synthesis of ethnobotany and chemical ecology. The Aymara of highland Bolivia have long used varieties of potato containing potentially toxic levels of glycoalkaloids, and Johns proposes that such plants can be eaten without harm owing to human genetic modification and cultural manipulation. Drawing on additional fieldwork in Africa, he considers the evolution of the human use of plants, the ways in which humans obtain foods from among the myriad poisonous and unpalatable plants in the environment, and the consequences of this history for understanding the basis of the human diet. A natural corollary to his investigation is the origin of medicine, since the properties of plants that make them unpalatable and toxic are the same properties that make them useful pharmacologically. As our species has adapted to the use of plants, plants have become an essential part of our internal ecology. Recovering the ancient wisdom regarding our interaction with the environment preserves a fundamental part of our human heritage.
Category: Social Science

Toxic Histories

Author : David Arnold
ISBN : 9781316495506
Genre : Technology & Engineering
File Size : 46.51 MB
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Toxic Histories combines social, scientific, medical and environmental history to demonstrate the critical importance of poison and pollution to colonial governance, scientific authority and public anxiety in India between the 1830s and 1950s. Against the background of India's 'poison culture' and periodic 'poison panics', David Arnold considers why many familiar substances came to be regarded under colonialism as dangerous poisons. As well as the criminal uses of poison, Toxic Histories shows how European and Indian scientists were instrumental in creating a distinctive system of forensic toxicology and medical jurisprudence designed for Indian needs and conditions, and how local, as well as universal, poison knowledge could serve constructive scientific and medical purposes. Arnold reflects on how the 'fear of a poisoned world' spilt over into concerns about contamination and pollution, giving ideas of toxicity a wider social and political significance that has continued into India's postcolonial era.
Category: Technology & Engineering

The Hamlet Fire

Author : Bryant Simon
ISBN : 9781620972397
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 66.82 MB
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"Captivating and brilliantly conceived. . . [The Hamlet Fire] will provide readers with insights into our current national politics." —The Washington Post A "gifted writer" (Chicago Tribune) uses a long forgotten factory fire in small-town North Carolina to show how cut-rate food and labor have become the new American norm For decades, the small, quiet town of Hamlet, North Carolina, thrived thanks to the railroad. But by the 1970s, it had become a postindustrial backwater, a magnet for businesses searching for cheap labor with little or almost no official oversight. One of these businesses was Imperial Food Products. The company paid its workers a dollar above the minimum wage to stand in pools of freezing water for hours on end, scraping gobs of fat off frozen chicken breasts before they got dipped in batter and fried into golden brown nuggets and tenders. If a worker complained about the heat or the cold or missed a shift to take care of their children or went to the bathroom too often they were fired. But they kept coming back to work because Hamlet was a place where jobs were scarce. Then, on the morning of September 3, 1991, the day after Labor Day, this factory that had never been inspected burst into flame. Twenty-five people—many of whom were black women with children, living on their own—perished that day behind the plant’s locked and bolted doors. Eighty years after the Triangle Shirtwaist Fire, industrial disasters were supposed to have been a thing of the past. After spending several years talking to local residents, state officials, and survivors of the fire, award-winning historian Bryant Simon has written a vivid, potent, and disturbing social autopsy of this town, this factory, and this time that shows how cheap labor, cheap government, and cheap food came together in a way that was bound for tragedy.
Category: Political Science