PARTING THE WATERS AMERICA IN THE KING YEARS 1954 63

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Parting The Waters

Author : Taylor Branch
ISBN : 9781416558682
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 89.66 MB
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In volume one of his America in the King Years, Pulitzer Prize winner Taylor Branch gives a masterly account of the American civil rights movement. Hailed as the most masterful story ever told of the American civil rights movement, Parting the Waters is destined to endure for generations. Moving from the fiery political baptism of Martin Luther King, Jr., to the corridors of Camelot where the Kennedy brothers weighed demands for justice against the deceptions of J. Edgar Hoover, here is a vivid tapestry of America, torn and finally transformed by a revolutionary struggle unequaled since the Civil War. Taylor Branch provides an unsurpassed portrait of King's rise to greatness and illuminates the stunning courage and private conflict, the deals, maneuvers, betrayals, and rivalries that determined history behind closed doors, at boycotts and sit-ins, on bloody freedom rides, and through siege and murder. Epic in scope and impact, Branch's chronicle definitively captures one of the nation's most crucial passages.
Category: Biography & Autobiography

Pillar Of Fire

Author : Taylor Branch
ISBN : 9781416558705
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 73.9 MB
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From Pulitzer Prize-winning author Taylor Branch, the second part of his epic trilogy on the American Civil Rights Movement. In the second volume of his three-part history, a monumental trilogy that began with Parting the Waters, winner of the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award, Taylor Branch portrays the Civil Rights Movement at its zenith, recounting the climactic struggles as they commanded the national stage.
Category: Biography & Autobiography

Andrew Young

Author : Andrew DeRoche
ISBN : 0842029575
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 56.29 MB
Format : PDF
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Andrew Young: Civil Rights Ambassador explores the rising influence of race in foreign relations as it examines the contributions of this African American activist, politician, and diplomat to U.S. foreign policy. Young used his positions as a member of the United States House of Representatives (1973 77), U.S. permanent representative to the United Nations (1977 79), and mayor of Atlanta during the 1980s to further the cause of race in diplomatic affairs and to bring an emphasis to United States relations with Africa. Author Andrew DeRoche begins his study of Young by looking at his formative years as a top assistant to Martin Luther King in the 1960s. It was during this period that Young developed his philosophy and his tactics. Young was committed to working for racial justice around the globe and he was willing to meet with all sides in any conflict. One of the few books that focuses on the influence of race in U.S. foreign policy, Andrew Young: Civil Rights Ambassador is informative reading for those interested in diplomatic history and African American history."
Category: Biography & Autobiography

Shaking The System

Author : Tim Stafford
ISBN : 9780830834365
Genre : History
File Size : 75.26 MB
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Looks at the roots of four great American social reform movements and explores the influence of faith-based communities on prohibition, abolition, women's suffrage, and the struggle for civil rights.
Category: History

Southern Writers

Author : Joseph M. Flora
ISBN : 9780807131237
Genre : Reference
File Size : 22.29 MB
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This new edition of Southern Writers assumes its distinguished predecessor's place as the essential reference on literary artists of the American South. Broadly expanded and thoroughly revised, it boasts 604 entries-nearly double the earlier edition's-written by 264 scholars. For every figure major and minor, from the venerable and canonical to the fresh and innovative, a biographical sketch and chronological list of published works provide comprehensive, concise, up-to-date information. Here in one convenient source are the South's novelists and short story writers, poets and dramatists, memoirists and essayists, journalists, scholars, and biographers from the colonial period to the twenty-first century. What constitutes a "southern writer" is always a matter for debate. Editors Joseph M. Flora and Amber Vogel have used a generous definition that turns on having a significant connection to the region, in either a personal or literary sense. New to this volume are younger writers who have emerged in the quarter century since the dictionary's original publication, as well as older talents previously unknown or unacknowledged. For almost every writer found in the previous edition, a new biography has been commissioned. Drawn from the very best minds on southern literature and covering the full spectrum of its practitioners, Southern Writers is an indispensable reference book for anyone intrigued by the subject.
Category: Reference

Social Ethics In The Making

Author : Gary Dorrien
ISBN : 1444305778
Genre : Religion
File Size : 69.32 MB
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In the early 1880s, proponents of what came to be called “thesocial gospel” founded what is now known as social ethics.This ambitious and magisterial book describes the tradition ofsocial ethics: one that began with the distinctly modern idea thatChristianity has a social-ethical mission to transform thestructures of society in the direction of social justice. Charts the story of social ethics - the idea that Christianityhas a social-ethical mission to transform society - from its rootsin the nineteenth century through to the present day Discusses and analyzes how different traditions of socialethics evolved in the realms of the academy, church, and generalpublic Looks at the wide variety of individuals who have beenprominent exponents of social ethics from academics and self-styled“public intellectuals” through to pastors andactivists Set to become the definitive reference guide to the history anddevelopment of social ethics Recipient of a CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title for2009 award
Category: Religion

Who S Who Of Pulitzer Prize Winners

Author : Elizabeth A. Brennan
ISBN : 1573561118
Genre : Reference
File Size : 41.90 MB
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List Pulitzer Prize winners in thirty-nine different categories, arranged chronologically, with biographical and career information, selected works, other awards, and a brief commentary, along with material on Pulitzer.
Category: Reference

Tolerating Intolerance

Author : Professor Amos N. Guiora
ISBN : 9780199331840
Genre : Law
File Size : 76.76 MB
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Over the years, numerous tragic events serve as a reminder of the extraordinary power of extremism, both on a religious and secular level. As extremism confronts society on a daily basis, it is essential to analyze, comprehend, and define it. It is also essential to define extremism narrowly in order to avoid the danger of recklessly castigating for mere thoughts alone. Tolerating Intolerance provides readers with a focused definition of extremism, and articulates the tensions faced in casting an arbitrary, capricious net in an effort to protect society, while offering mechanisms to resolve its seemingly intractable conundrum. Professor Guiora examines extremism in six different countries: Germany, Israel, the Netherlands, Norway, the United Kingdom, and the United States through interviews with a wide range of individuals including academics, policy makers, faith leaders, public commentators, national security and law enforcement officials. This enables both an in-depth discussion of extremism in each country, and facilitates a comparative analysis regarding both religious and secular extremism.
Category: Law

The Music Has Gone Out Of The Movement

Author : David C. Carter
ISBN : 9781469606576
Genre : History
File Size : 24.41 MB
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After the passage of sweeping civil rights and voting rights legislation in 1964 and 1965, the civil rights movement stood poised to build on considerable momentum. In a famous speech at Howard University in 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson declared that victory in the next battle for civil rights would be measured in "equal results" rather than equal rights and opportunities. It seemed that for a brief moment the White House and champions of racial equality shared the same objectives and priorities. Finding common ground proved elusive, however, in a climate of growing social and political unrest marked by urban riots, the Vietnam War, and resurgent conservatism. Examining grassroots movements and organizations and their complicated relationships with the federal government and state authorities between 1965 and 1968, David C. Carter takes readers through the inner workings of local civil rights coalitions as they tried to maintain strength within their organizations while facing both overt and subtle opposition from state and federal officials. He also highlights internal debates and divisions within the White House and the executive branch, demonstrating that the federal government's relationship to the movement and its major goals was never as clear-cut as the president's progressive rhetoric suggested. Carter reveals the complex and often tense relationships between the Johnson administration and activist groups advocating further social change, and he extends the traditional timeline of the civil rights movement beyond the passage of the Voting Rights Act.
Category: History

The Columbia Guide To African American History Since 1939

Author : Robert L Harris Jr.
ISBN : 9780231510875
Genre : History
File Size : 41.65 MB
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This book is a multifaceted approach to understanding the central developments in African American history since 1939. It combines a historical overview of key personalities and movements with essays by leading scholars on specific facets of the African American experience, a chronology of events, and a guide to further study. Marian Anderson's famous 1939 concert in front of the Lincoln Memorial was a watershed moment in the struggle for racial justice. Beginning with this event, the editors chart the historical efforts of African Americans to address racism and inequality. They explore the rise of the Civil Rights and Black Power movements and the national and international contexts that shaped their ideologies and methods; consider how changes in immigration patterns have complicated the conventional "black/white" dichotomy in U.S. society; discuss the often uneasy coexistence between a growing African American middle class and a persistent and sizable underclass; and address the complexity of the contemporary African American experience. Contributors consider specific issues in African American life, including the effects of the postindustrial economy and the influence of music, military service, sports, literature, culture, business, and the politics of self-designation, e.g.,"Colored" vs. "Negro," "Black" vs. "African American". While emphasizing political and social developments, this volume also illuminates important economic, military, and cultural themes. An invaluable resource, The Columbia Guide to African American History Since 1939 provides a thorough understanding of a crucial historical period.
Category: History