Paleoindian Or Paleoarchaic

Author : Kelly E. Graf
ISBN : 0874809118
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 51.68 MB
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Offers an updated perspective of human ecology and organization during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition in the Great Basin, 13,000-8,000 years ago, with special regard to whether these hunter-gatherers possessed a Paleoindian or Paleoarchaic lifeway.
Category: Social Science

From The Pleistocene To The Holocene

Author : C. Britt Bousman
ISBN : 9781603447782
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 75.24 MB
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The end of the Pleistocene era brought dramatic environmental changes to small bands of humans living in North America: changes that affected subsistence, mobility, demography, technology, and social relations. The transition they made from Paleoindian (Pleistocene) to Archaic (Early Holocene) societies represents the first major cultural shift that took place solely in the Americas. This event—which manifested in ways and at times much more varied than often supposed—set the stage for the unique developments of behavioral complexity that distinguish later Native American prehistoric societies. Using localized studies and broad regional syntheses, the contributors to this volume demonstrate the diversity of adaptations to the dynamic and changing environmental and cultural landscapes that occurred between the Pleistocene and early portion of the Holocene. The authors' research areas range from Northern Mexico to Alaska and across the continent to the American Northeast, synthesizing the copious available evidence from well-known and recent excavations.With its methodologically and geographically diverse approach, From the Pleistocene to the Holocene: Human Organization and Cultural Transformations in Prehistoric North America provides an overview of the present state of knowledge regarding this crucial transformative period in Native North America. It offers a large-scale synthesis of human adaptation, reflects the range of ideas and concepts in current archaeological theoretical approaches, and acts as a springboard for future explanations and models of prehistoric change.
Category: Social Science

Lithic Technological Organization And Paleoenvironmental Change

Author : Erick Robinson
ISBN : 9783319644073
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 58.82 MB
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The objective of this edited volume is to bring together a diverse set of analyses to document how small-scale societies responded to paleoenvironmental change based on the evidence of their lithic technologies. The contributions bring together an international forum for interpreting changes in technological organization - embracing a wide range of time periods, geographic regions and methodological approaches.​ ​As technology brings more refined information on ancient climates, the research on spatial and temporal variability of paleoenvironmental changes. In turn, this has also broadened considerations of the many ways that prehistoric hunter-gatherers may have responded to fluctuations in resource bases. From an archaeological perspective, stone tools and their associated debitage provide clues to understanding these past choices and decisions, and help to further the investigation into how variable human responses may have been. Despite significant advances in the theory and methodology of lithic technological analysis, there have been few attempts to link these developments to paleoenvironmental research on a global scale.
Category: Social Science

Lake Bonneville A Scientific Update

Author : Charles G. Oviatt
ISBN : 9780444635945
Genre : Science
File Size : 39.58 MB
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Lake Bonneville: A Scientific Update showcases new information and interpretations about this important lake in the North American Great Basin, presenting a relatively complete summary of the evolving scientific ideas about the Pleistocene lake. A comprehensive book on Lake Bonneville has not been published since the masterpiece of G.K. Gilbert in 1890. Because of Gilbert’s work, Lake Bonneville has been the starting point for many studies of Quaternary paleolakes in many places throughout the world. Numerous journal articles, and a few books on specialized topics related to Lake Bonneville, have been published since the late 1800s, but here the editors compile the important data and perspectives of the early 21st century into a book that will be an essential reference for future generations. Scientific research on Lake Bonneville is vibrant today and will continue into the future. Makes the widespread and detailed literature on this well-known Pleistocene body of water accessible Gives expositions of the many famous and iconic landforms and deposits Contains over 300 illustrations, most in full color Contains chapters on many important topics, including stratigraphy, sedimentology, hydrology, geomorphology, geochronology, isostasy, geophysics, geochemistry, vegetation history, pollen, fishes, mammals, mountain glaciation, prehistoric humans, paleoclimate, remote sensing, and geoantiquities in the Bonneville basin
Category: Science

Emergence And Diversity Of Modern Human Behavior In Paleolithic Asia

Author : Yousuke Kaifu
ISBN : 9781623492762
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 79.83 MB
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Despite the obvious geographic importance of eastern Asia in human migration, its discussion in the context of the emergence and dispersal of modern humans has been rare. Emergence and Diversity of Modern Human Behavior in Paleolithic Asia focuses long-overdue scholarly attention on this under-studied area of the world. Arising from a 2011 symposium sponsored by the National Museum of Nature and Science in Tokyo, this book gathers the work of archaeologists from the Pacific Rim of Asia, Australia, and North America, to address the relative lack of attention given to the emergence of modern human behavior as manifested in Asia during the worldwide dispersal from Africa.
Category: Social Science

The Oxford Handbook Of North American Archaeology

Author : Timothy Pauketat
ISBN : 9780190241094
Genre : History
File Size : 68.51 MB
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This volume explores 15,000 years of indigenous human history on the North American continent, drawing on the latest archaeological theories, time-honored methodologies, and rich datasets. From the Arctic south to the Mexican border and east to the Atlantic Ocean, all of the major cultural developments are covered in 53 chapters, with certain periods, places, and historical problems receiving special focus by the volume's authors. Questions like who first peopled the continent, what did it mean to have been a hunter-gatherer in the Great Basin versus the California coast, how significant were cultural exchanges between Native North Americans and Mesoamericans, and why do major historical changes seem to correspond to shifts in religion, politics, demography, and economy are brought into focus. The practice of archaeology itself is discussed as contributors wrestle with modern-day concerns with the implications of doing archaeology and its relevance for understanding ourselves today. In the end, the chapters in this book show us that the principal questions answered about human history through the archaeology of North America are central to any larger understanding of the relationships between people, cultural identities, landscapes, and the living of everyday life.
Category: History

The Great Basin

Author : Donald Grayson
ISBN : 9780520267473
Genre : Nature
File Size : 37.29 MB
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"The Great Basin, centering on Nevada and including substantial parts of California, Oregon, and Utah, gets its name from the fact that none of its rivers or streams flow to the sea. This book synthesizes the past 25,000 years of the natural history of this vast region. It explores the extinct animals that lived in the Great Basin during the Ice Age and recounts the rise and fall of the massive Ice Age lakes that existed here. It explains why trees once grew 13' beneath what is now the surface of Lake Tahoe, explores the nearly two dozen Great Basin mountain ranges that once held substantial glaciers, and tells the remarkable story of how pinyon pine came to cover some 17,000,000 acres of the Great Basin in the relatively recent past.These discussions culminate with the impressive history of the prehistoric people of the Great Basin, a history that shows how human societies dealt with nearly 13,000 years of climate change on this often-challenging landscape"--Provided by publisher.
Category: Nature

The Oxford Handbook Of The Archaeology And Anthropology Of Hunter Gatherers

Author : Vicki Cummings
ISBN : 9780199551224
Genre : History
File Size : 37.70 MB
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For more than a century, the study of hunting and gathering societies has been central to the development of both archaeology and anthropology as academic disciplines, and has also generated widespread public interest and debate. This book provides a comprehensive review of hunter-gatherer studies, tracing histories of research and undertaking detailed regional and thematic case-studies that span the archaeology, history and anthropology of hunter gatherers,concluding with an in-depth review of the main opportunities, research questions, and moral obligations that lie ahead.
Category: History

Alberta S Lower Athabasca Basin

Author : Brian M. Ronaghan
ISBN : 9781926836904
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 86.4 MB
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Over the past two decades, the oil sands region of northeastern Alberta has been the site of unprecedented levels of development. Alberta's Lower Athabasca Basin tells a fascinating story of how a catastrophic ice age flood left behind a unique landscape in the Lower Athabasca Basin, one that made deposits of bitumen available for surface mining. Less well known is the discovery that this flood also produced an environment that supported perhaps the most intensive use of boreal forest resources by prehistoric Native people yet recognized in Canada. Studies undertaken to meet the conservation requirements of the Alberta Historical Resources Act have yielded a rich and varied record of prehistoric habitation and activity in the oil sands area. Evidence from between 9,500 and 5,000 years ago—the result of several major excavations—has confirmed extensive human use of the region’s resources, while important contextual information provided by key geological and palaeoenvironmental studies has deepened our understanding of how the region’s early inhabitants interacted with the landscape. Touching on various elements of this rich environmental and archaeological record, the contributors to this volume use the evidence gained through research and compliance studies to offer new insights into human and natural history. They also examine the challenges of managing this irreplaceable heritage resource in the face of ongoing development. Contributors: Alwynne Beaudoin, Angela Younie, Brian O.K. Reeves, Duane Froese, Elizabeth Roberston, Eugene Gryba, Gloria Fedirchuk, Grant Clarke, John W. Ives, Janet Blakey, Jennifer Tischer, Jim Burns, Laura Roskowski, Luc Bouchet, Murray Lobb, Nancy Saxberg, Raymond LeBlanc, Robert R. Young, Robin Woywitka, Thomas V. Lowell, and Timothy Fisher
Category: Social Science