OZETTE EXCAVATING A MAKAH WHALING VILLAGE

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Ozette

Author : Ruth Kirk
ISBN : 0295994622
Genre : History
File Size : 79.38 MB
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Makah families left the coastal village of Ozette in the 1920s to comply with the federal government's requirement that they send their children to school, and by doing so they ended nearly two thousand years of occupation at this strategic whale- and seal-hunting site on Washington's Olympic Peninsula. Archaeologist Richard Daugherty took note of the site in a survey of the coast in 1947 and later returned at the request of the Makah tribal chairman when storm waves began exposing both architecture and artifacts. Full-scale excavations from 1966 to 1981 revealed houses and their contents--including ordinarily perishable wood and basketry objects that had been buried in a mudflow well before the arrival of Europeans in the region. Led by Daugherty, with a team of graduate and undergraduate students and Makah tribal members, the work culminated in the creation of the Makah Museum in Neah Bay, where more than 55,000 Ozette artifacts are curated and displayed. Ozette: Excavating a Makah Whaling Village is a comprehensive and highly readable account of this world-famous archaeological site and the hydraulic excavation of the mudslide that both demolished the houses and protected the objects inside from decay. Ruth Kirk was present, documenting the archaeological work from its beginning, and her firsthand knowledge of the people and efforts involved enrich her compelling story of discovery, fieldwork, and deepen our understanding of Makah cultural heritage.
Category: History

Archaeology In Washington

Author : Ruth Kirk
ISBN : 0295986972
Genre : History
File Size : 71.92 MB
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Archaeology--along with Native American traditions and memories--holds a key to understanding early chapters of the human story in Washington. This all-new book draws together and brings up to date much of what has been learned about the state's prehistory and the environments early people experienced. It presents a sample of sites representing Washington's geographic regions and touches on historical archaeology, including excavations at fur-trade forts and the Whitman mission, and Cathlapotle, a Columbia River village visited by Lewis and Clark. The authors portray the discovery of a mastodon butchered by hunters on the Olympic Peninsula 14,000 years ago; the nearly 13,000-year-old Clovis points in an East Wenatchee apple orchard; an 11,200-year-old "Marmes Man" in the Palouse; and the controversial "Kennewick Man," more than 9,000 years old, eroded out of the riverbank at Tri-Cities. They discuss a 5,000-year-old camas earth oven in the Pend Oreille country; 5,000 years of human habitation at Seattle's Metro sewage treatment site; the recovery at Hoko River near Neah Bay of a 3,200-year-old fishnet made of split spruce boughs and tiny stone knife blades still hafted in cedar handles; and the world-renowned coastal excavations at Ozette, where mudslides repeatedly swept into houses, burying and preserving them. The tale ranges from the earliest bands of hunters, fishers, and gatherers to the complex social organizations and highly developed technologies of native peoples at the time of their disruption by the arrival of Euro-American newcomers. Also included is a summary of the changing role, techniques, and perspectives of archaeology itself, from the surveys and salvage excavation barely ahead of dam construction on the Snake and among Columbia rivers to today's collaboration between archaeologists, Native Americans, private landowners, and public agencies. Color photographs, line drawings, and maps lavishly illustrate the text.
Category: History

Voices Of A Thousand People

Author : Patricia Pierce Erikson
ISBN : 0803267568
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 32.60 MB
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Voices of a Thousand People is the story of one Native community?s efforts to found their own museum and empower themselves to represent their ancient traditional lifeways, their historic experiences with colonialism, and their contemporary efforts to preserve their heritage for generations to come. This ethnography richly portrays how a community embraced the archaeological discovery of Ozette village in 1970 and founded the Makah Cultural and Research Center (MCRC) in 1979. Oral testimonies, participant observation, and archival research weave a vivid portrait of a cultural center that embodies the self-image of a Native American community in tension with the identity assigned to it by others.
Category: Social Science

Snow Pb

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ISBN : 0295802359
Genre :
File Size : 45.57 MB
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What This Awl Means

Author : Janet Spector
ISBN : 0873517571
Genre : Feminist criticism
File Size : 27.80 MB
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This pioneering work focuses on excavations and discoveries at Little Rapids, a 19th-century Eastern Dakota planting village near present-day Minneapolis.
Category: Feminist criticism

Exploring Washington S Past

Author : Ruth Kirk
ISBN : 0295974435
Genre : Travel
File Size : 38.69 MB
Format : PDF
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Exploring Washington's Past tells the state's story in terms of where to go and what to see. With words, photographs, and maps, the authors evoke the cultural landscape and portray Washington's people and events from the days of the fur trade and pioneer settlement to the recent past. Capsule descriptions of small communities -- from Altoona to Zillah -- are interwoven with those of better known cities, and eastern and western Washington receive equal attention. More than two hundred photographs portray our historical landscape through images of today intermixed with a sampling of the past. This book will be an indispensable guide for residents, tourists, and armchair travelers.
Category: Travel

Spirits Of Our Whaling Ancestors

Author : Charlotte Cote
ISBN : 9780295997582
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 71.80 MB
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Following the removal of the gray whale from the Endangered Species list in 1994, the Makah tribe of northwest Washington State announced that they would revive their whale hunts; their relatives, the Nuu-chah-nulth Nation of British Columbia, shortly followed suit. Neither tribe had exercised their right to whale - in the case of the Makah, a right affirmed in their 1855 treaty with the federal government - since the gray whale had been hunted nearly to extinction by commercial whalers in the 1920s. The Makah whale hunt of 1999 was an event of international significance, connected to the worldwide struggle for aboriginal sovereignty and to the broader discourses of environmental sustainability, treaty rights, human rights, and animal rights. It was met with enthusiastic support and vehement opposition. As a member of the Nuu-chah-nulth Nation, Charlotte Cote offers a valuable perspective on the issues surrounding indigenous whaling, past and present. Whaling served important social, economic, and ritual functions that have been at the core of Makah and Nuu-chahnulth societies throughout their histories. Even as Native societies faced disease epidemics and federal policies that undermined their cultures, they remained connected to their traditions. The revival of whaling has implications for the physical, mental, and spiritual health of these Native communities today, Cote asserts. Whaling, she says, �defines who we are as a people.� Her analysis includes major Native studies and contemporary Native rights issues, and addresses environmentalism, animal rights activism, anti-treaty conservatism, and the public�s expectations about what it means to be �Indian.� These thoughtful critiques are intertwined with the author�s personal reflections, family stories, and information from indigenous, anthropological, and historical sources to provide a bridge between cultures.
Category: Social Science

Tradition Change On The Northwest Coast

Author : Ruth Kirk
ISBN : 0295966289
Genre : History
File Size : 65.50 MB
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Native elders remember well the last of the old days. They are living links to the past and their stories have the vitality and immediacy--as well as the authenticity--of those who have lived in the traditional way and experienced the transition to the new. In the short space of two generations, elders have gone from traveling the coast in canoes to flying in float planes. Four representative groups of the Northwest Coast are the focus of this book: the Makah, Nuu-chah-nulth (Nootka), Southern Kwakiutl, and Nuxalk (Bella Coola). These people speak closely related languages and have strong cultural ties. In these pages they speak both of tradition and of an embattled present together with dreams of the future. In many ways this book is a native chronicle about being native. First-person accounts drawn from archival tapes and manuscripts plus scores of direct interviews enliven every facet of life described here: ceremonials and gathering; artwork and potlatch; trade and conflict; the environment, prehistory, and archaeological discoveries; the arrival of Whites and the fur trade, followed by settlement, and the consequence of change, including loss of lands. Woven throughout are reminiscences of the past, assessments of the present, and hopes and fears of the future. Stunning photographs, including rare historic photographs and contemporary pictures specifically taken for this book, and drawings present telling images of native people and show their links with the land and their adherence to tradition in the midst of change.
Category: History

Hunters Of The Whale

Author : Kirk, Ruth
ISBN : 0688201091
Genre : Juvenile Nonfiction
File Size : 54.96 MB
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Describes an archaeological dig at Ozette, Washington, on the site of a Makah Indian village inhabited for at least 2,000 years.
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Sunrise To Paradise

Author : Ruth Kirk
ISBN : 0295977701
Genre : Nature
File Size : 46.13 MB
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On clear days, the mammoth volcano Mount Rainier dominates the Seattle and Tacoma skylines and can be seen from Whidbey Island to Yakima and the central Washington wheat fields. "The Mountain's out " is a cheerful local greeting, especially after a long spell of overcast weather. Sunrise to Paradise explores the rich history of this symbol of the Pacific Northwest and the national park that preserves it. Mount Rainier is the fifth highest peak in the United States outside Alaska, and it soars higher above its immediate base than does any other in the lower forty-eight. Sunrise to Paradise describes its geological and glacial origins and current ecological health, and the century-old stewardship of Mount Rainier National Park. Its stories include accounts by Native people such as Saluskin and Wapowety, climbers from John Muir and Fay Fuller to Willi Unsoeld and Lou Whittaker, and entrepreneurs from the Longmire family to Paul Sceva. Here, too, are the tales of scientists and tourists, park rangers and volunteers. Numerous illustrations span the decades. Some of the photographs were taken from albums of the 1912 and 1915 Mountaineers outings; others are by noted photographers of the past like Imogen Cunningham and Asahel Curtis and by contemporary photographers including Ira Spring. There are paintings by Abby Williams Hill and George Tsutakawa and a series specially created by Dee Molenaar.
Category: Nature