ON THE LAND OF MY FATHER A FARM UPBRINGING IN SEGREGATED MISSISSIPPI

Download On The Land Of My Father A Farm Upbringing In Segregated Mississippi ebook PDF or Read Online books in PDF, EPUB, and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to ON THE LAND OF MY FATHER A FARM UPBRINGING IN SEGREGATED MISSISSIPPI book pdf for free now.

On The Land Of My Father

Author : Bevelyn Charlene Exposé
ISBN : 9781476613529
Genre : History
File Size : 51.32 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 634
Read : 599

This book evokes a time and place that is central to the American experience, a past to be remembered. This simple and direct narrative of family values and connections to the land is full of description. Land ownership bonded a black family to its white neighbors in segregated southern Mississippi in the 1940s. The author's father and brothers served in segregated armed forces to protect their country, and returned home to a segregated society. Working the land gave its workers identity, pride, and a feeling of competence. Education provided independence and freedom, and religion was the glue that held the family together.
Category: History

Delta Rainbow

Author : Sally Palmer Thomason
ISBN : 9781496806659
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 66.28 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 778
Read : 657

Betty Bobo Pearson (b. 1922), a seventh-generation, plantation-born Mississippian, defied her cultural heritage—and caused great personal pain for her parents and herself—when she became an activist in the civil rights movement. Never fearing to break the mold in her search for the “best,” in her nineties she remains a strong, effective leader with a fun-loving, generous spirit. When Betty was eighteen months old, a train smashed into the car her mother was driving, killing Betty’s beloved grandfather and severely injuring her grandmother. Thrown onto the engine’s cow catcher, Betty lived and did not remember the accident. She did, however, grow up to fulfill her grandmother’s prediction: “Betty, God reached down and plucked you from in front of that train because he has something very special he wants you to do with your life.” In 1943, twenty-one-year-old Betty, soon to graduate from the University of Mississippi, received a full tuition scholarship to Columbia Graduate School in New York City. Ecstatic, she rushed home to tell her parents. “ABSOLUTELY NOT. There is no way I’ll allow my daughter to live in Yankee Land,” her father replied. After fierce argument and much door slamming, Betty could not defy her father. But she had to show him she was her own person. Her nation was at war—so Betty joined the Marines. After the war, Betty married Bill Pearson and became mistress of Rainbow Plantation in the Delta. In 1955, she attended the Emmett Till trial (accompanied by her close friend and budding civil rights activist Florence Mars) and was shocked by the virulent degree of racism she witnessed there. Seeing her world in a new way, she became a courageous and dedicated supporter of the civil rights movement. Her activities severely fractured her close relationship with her parents. Yet, as a warm friend and bold, persuasive leader, Betty made an indelible mark in her church, in the Delta communities, in the lives of the people she employed, and in her beautiful garden at Rainbow.
Category: Biography & Autobiography

Slaves In The Family

Author : Edward Ball
ISBN : 9781466897496
Genre : History
File Size : 54.20 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 593
Read : 443

Fifteen years after its hardcover debut, the FSG Classics reissue of the celebrated work of narrative nonfiction that won the National Book Award and changed the American conversation about race, with a new preface by the author The Ball family hails from South Carolina—Charleston and thereabouts. Their plantations were among the oldest and longest-standing plantations in the South. Between 1698 and 1865, close to four thousand black people were born into slavery under the Balls or were bought by them. In Slaves in the Family, Edward Ball recounts his efforts to track down and meet the descendants of his family's slaves. Part historical narrative, part oral history, part personal story of investigation and catharsis, Slaves in the Family is, in the words of Pat Conroy, "a work of breathtaking generosity and courage, a magnificent study of the complexity and strangeness and beauty of the word ‘family.'"
Category: History

The Fiery Trial Abraham Lincoln And American Slavery

Author : Eric Foner
ISBN : 039308082X
Genre : History
File Size : 55.22 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 840
Read : 939

“A masterwork [by] the preeminent historian of the Civil War era.”—Boston Globe Selected as a Notable Book of the Year by the New York Times Book Review, this landmark work gives us a definitive account of Lincoln's lifelong engagement with the nation's critical issue: American slavery. A master historian, Eric Foner draws Lincoln and the broader history of the period into perfect balance. We see Lincoln, a pragmatic politician grounded in principle, deftly navigating the dynamic politics of antislavery, secession, and civil war. Lincoln's greatness emerges from his capacity for moral and political growth.
Category: History

The Help

Author : Kathryn Stockett
ISBN : 9780425245132
Genre : Fiction
File Size : 56.15 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 566
Read : 724

Limited and persecuted by racial divides in 1962 Jackson, Mississippi, three women, including an African-American maid, her sassy and chronically unemployed friend and a recently graduated white woman, team up for a clandestine project against a backdrop of the budding civil rights era. Includes reading-group guide. Reissue. A #1 best-selling novel.
Category: Fiction

The White Boy Shuffle

Author : Paul Beatty
ISBN : 9781786072269
Genre : Fiction
File Size : 82.95 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 338
Read : 868

Paul Beatty's hilarious and scathing debut novel is about Gunnar Kaufman, an awkward, black surfer bum who is moved by his mother from Santa Monica to urban West Los Angeles. There, he begins to undergo a startling transformation from neighborhood outcast to basketball superstar, and eventually to reluctant messiah of a "divided, downtrodden people". A bombastic coming-of-age novel that has the uncanny ability to make readers want to laugh and cry at the same time. Beatty mingles horrific reality with wild fancy in this remarkable debut novel.
Category: Fiction

Living In Living Out

Author : Elizabeth Clark-Lewis
ISBN : 9781588344427
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 45.22 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 895
Read : 349

This oral history portrays the lives of African American women who migrated from the rural South to work as domestic servants in Washington, DC in the early decades of the twentieth century. In Living In, Living Out Elizabeth Clark-Lewis narrates the personal experiences of eighty-one women who worked for wealthy white families. These women describe how they encountered—but never accepted—the master-servant relationship, and recount their struggles to change their status from “live in” servants to daily paid workers who “lived out.” With candor and passion, the women interviewed tell of leaving their families and adjusting to city life “up North,” of being placed as live-in servants, and of the frustrations and indignities they endured as domestics. By networking on the job, at churches, and at penny savers clubs, they found ways to transform their unending servitude into an employer-employee relationship—gaining a new independence that could only be experienced by living outside of their employers' homes. Clark-Lewis points out that their perseverance and courage not only improved their own lot but also transformed work life for succeeding generations of African American women. A series of in-depth vignettes about the later years of these women bears poignant witness to their efforts to carve out lives of fulfillment and dignity.
Category: Social Science

The Best That I Can Be

Author : Rafer Johnson
ISBN : UVA:X004224438
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 51.96 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 747
Read : 885

The 1960 Olympic decathlon gold-medal winner, lifelong Christian, and African-American hero recounts his journey from a Texas shanty town to rural California to UCLA, where he became a world-famous athlete and began his remarkable career.
Category: Biography & Autobiography

Hands On The Freedom Plow

Author : Faith S. Holsaert
ISBN : 9780252098871
Genre : History
File Size : 57.86 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 473
Read : 1214

In Hands on the Freedom Plow, fifty-two women--northern and southern, young and old, urban and rural, black, white, and Latina--share their courageous personal stories of working for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) on the front lines of the Civil Rights Movement. The testimonies gathered here present a sweeping personal history of SNCC: early sit-ins, voter registration campaigns, and freedom rides; the 1963 March on Washington, the Mississippi Freedom Summer, and the movements in Alabama and Maryland; and Black Power and antiwar activism. Since the women spent time in the Deep South, many also describe risking their lives through beatings and arrests and witnessing unspeakable violence. These intense stories depict women, many very young, dealing with extreme fear and finding the remarkable strength to survive. The women in SNCC acquired new skills, experienced personal growth, sustained one another, and even had fun in the midst of serious struggle. Readers are privy to their analyses of the Movement, its tactics, strategies, and underlying philosophies. The contributors revisit central debates of the struggle including the role of nonviolence and self-defense, the role of white people in a black-led movement, and the role of women within the Movement and the society at large. Each story reveals how the struggle for social change was formed, supported, and maintained by the women who kept their "hands on the freedom plow." As the editors write in the introduction, "Though the voices are different, they all tell the same story--of women bursting out of constraints, leaving school, leaving their hometowns, meeting new people, talking into the night, laughing, going to jail, being afraid, teaching in Freedom Schools, working in the field, dancing at the Elks Hall, working the WATS line to relay horror story after horror story, telling the press, telling the story, telling the word. And making a difference in this world."
Category: History

Evicted

Author : Matthew Desmond
ISBN : 9780553447439
Genre : POLITICAL SCIENCE
File Size : 66.90 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 293
Read : 547

Even in the most desolate areas of American cities, evictions used to be rare. But today, most poor families are spending over half of their income on housing and millions are forced from their homes each year. In the inner city, eviction has become ordinary, especially for single mothers. In vivid, intimate prose, Desmond provides a ground-level view of one of the most urgent issues facing America today.
Category: POLITICAL SCIENCE