NEXUS STRATEGIC COMMUNICATIONS AND AMERICAN SECURITY IN WORLD WAR I HARVARD HISTORICAL STUDIES

Download Nexus Strategic Communications And American Security In World War I Harvard Historical Studies ebook PDF or Read Online books in PDF, EPUB, and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to NEXUS STRATEGIC COMMUNICATIONS AND AMERICAN SECURITY IN WORLD WAR I HARVARD HISTORICAL STUDIES book pdf for free now.

Nexus

Author : Jonathan Reed Winkler
ISBN : 0674028392
Genre : History
File Size : 53.89 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 201
Read : 448

In an illuminating study that blends diplomatic, military, technology, and business history, Winkler shows how U.S. officials during World War I discovered the enormous value of global communications. In this absorbing history, Winkler sheds light on the early stages of the global infrastructure that helped launch the United States as the predominant power of the century.
Category: History

Nexus

Author : Jonathan Reed Winkler
ISBN : 0674028392
Genre : History
File Size : 47.21 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 899
Read : 210

In an illuminating study that blends diplomatic, military, technology, and business history, Winkler shows how U.S. officials during World War I discovered the enormous value of global communications. In this absorbing history, Winkler sheds light on the early stages of the global infrastructure that helped launch the United States as the predominant power of the century.
Category: History

Cyber Blockades

Author : Alison Lawlor Russell
ISBN : 9781626161122
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 47.20 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 383
Read : 633

This is the first book to examine cyber blockades, which are large-scale attacks on infrastructure or systems that prevent a state from accessing cyberspace, thus preventing the transmission (ingress/egress) of data. The attack can take place through digital, physical, and/or electromagnetic means, and it can be conducted by another state or a sub-state group. The purpose of this book is to understand how cyber blockades can shut down or otherwise render cyberspace useless for an entire country, and Russell also seeks to understand the implications of cyber blockades for international relations. A cyber blockade can be either a legitimate or illegitimate tool depending on the circumstances. What is certain is that the state on the receiving end faces a serious threat to its political, military, economic, and social stability. The book includes two in-depth case studies of cyber blockades, Estonia in 2007 and Georgia in 2008, both of which suffered cyber attacks from Russia. Russell compares cyber blockades with those in other domains (sea, land, air, and space) and offers recommendations for policymakers and for further academic study.
Category: Political Science

African American Officers In Liberia

Author : Brian G. Shellum
ISBN : 9781612349558
Genre : History
File Size : 27.19 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 471
Read : 974

"The story of seventeen African American officers who trained, reorganized, and commanded the Liberian Frontier Force to defend Liberia between 1910 and 1942"--
Category: History

The Long War

Author : Andrew J. Bacevich
ISBN : 9780231505864
Genre : History
File Size : 28.31 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 563
Read : 1256

Essays by a diverse and distinguished group of historians, political scientists, and sociologists examine the alarms, emergencies, controversies, and confusions that have characterized America's Cold War, the post-Cold War interval of the 1990s, and today's "Global War on Terror." This "Long War" has left its imprint on virtually every aspect of American life; by considering it as a whole, The Long War is the first volume to take a truly comprehensive look at America's response to the national-security crisis touched off by the events of World War II. Contributors consider topics ranging from grand strategy and strategic bombing to ideology and economics and assess the changing American way of war and Hollywood's surprisingly consistent depiction of Americans at war. They evaluate the evolution of the national-security apparatus and the role of dissenters who viewed the myriad activities of that apparatus with dismay. They take a fresh look at the Long War's civic implications and its impact on civil-military relations. More than a military history, The Long War examines the ideas, policies, and institutions that have developed since the United States claimed the role of global superpower. This protracted crisis has become a seemingly permanent, if not defining aspect of contemporary American life. In breaking down the old and artificial boundaries that have traditionally divided the postwar period into neat historical units, this volume provides a better understanding of the evolution of the United States and U.S. policy since World War II and offers a fresh perspective on our current national security predicament.
Category: History

In Spies We Trust

Author : Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones
ISBN : 9780191651717
Genre : History
File Size : 57.72 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 476
Read : 1069

In Spies We Trust reveals the full story of the Anglo-American intelligence relationship - ranging from the deceits of World War I to the mendacities of 9/11 - for the first time. Why did we ever start trusting spies? It all started a hundred years ago. First we put our faith in them to help win wars, then we turned against the bloodshed and expense, and asked our spies instead to deliver peace and security. By the end of World War II, Britain and America were cooperating effectively to that end. At its peak in the 1940s and 1950s, the 'special intelligence relationship' contributed to national and international security in what was an Anglo-American century. But from the 1960s this 'special relationship' went into decline. Britain weakened, American attitudes changed, and the fall of the Soviet Union dissolved the fear that bound London and Washington together. A series of intelligence scandals along the way further eroded public confidence. Yet even in these years, the US offered its old intelligence partner a vital gift: congressional attempts to oversee the CIA in the 1970s encouraged subsequent moves towards more open government in Britain and beyond. So which way do we look now? And what are the alternatives to the British-American intelligence relationship that held sway in the West for so much of the twentieth century? Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones shows that there are a number - the most promising of which, astonishingly, remain largely unknown to the Anglophone world.
Category: History

Strategic Narratives Public Opinion And War

Author : Beatrice De Graaf
ISBN : 1138221848
Genre :
File Size : 51.61 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 270
Read : 1089

This volume explores the way governments endeavoured to build and maintain public support for the war in Afghanistan, combining new insights on the effects of strategic narratives with an exhaustive series of case studies. In contemporary wars, with public opinion impacting heavily on outcomes, strategic narratives provide a grid for interpreting the why, whatand howof the conflict. This book asks how public support for the deployment of military troops to Afghanistan was garnered, sustained or lost in thirteen contributing nations. Public attitudes in the US, Canada, Australia and Europe towards the use of military force were greatly shaped by the cohesiveness and content of the strategic narratives employed by national policy-makers. Assessing the ability of countries to craft a successful strategic narrative, the book addresses the following key areas: 1) how governments employ strategic narratives to gain public support; 2) how strategic narratives develop during the course of the conflict; 3) how these narratives are disseminated, framed and perceived through various media outlets; 4) how domestic audiences respond to strategic narratives; 5) how this interplay is conditioned by both events on the ground, in Afghanistan, and by structural elements of the domestic political systems. This book will be of much interest to students of international intervention, foreign policy, political communication, international security, strategic studies and IR in general.
Category:

Nexus Analysis

Author : Ronald Scollon
ISBN : 0415320623
Genre : Language Arts & Disciplines
File Size : 36.10 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 486
Read : 189

Review: "Using as a study their own experience of pioneering computer-mediated communication in Alaska in the late 1970s and early 1980s, the authors conduct a 'nexus analysis' of those events and discourses. As email and audio/video conferencing technologies expanded the possibilities for education and social interaction, the authors played an active role in shaping and analyzing their use. Looking back on that early formative period and assessing its impact on the present world, the authors evaluate moments of social importance in order to examine the linkages among social practices, Alaskan peoples, and technologies. They consider the power of communication media to cause and ramify change."--BOOK JACKET
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

America As Second Creation

Author : David E. Nye
ISBN : 9780262263948
Genre : History
File Size : 21.9 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 841
Read : 308

After 1776, the former American colonies began to reimagine themselves as a unified, self-created community. Technologies had an important role in the resulting national narratives, and a few technologies assumed particular prominence. Among these were the axe, the mill, the canal, the railroad, and the irrigation dam. In this book David Nye explores the stories that clustered around these technologies. In doing so, he rediscovers an American story of origins, with America conceived as a second creation built in harmony with God's first creation.While mainstream Americans constructed technological foundation stories to explain their place in the New World, however, marginalized groups told other stories of destruction and loss. Native Americans protested the loss of their forests, fishermen resisted the construction of dams, and early environmentalists feared the exhaustionof resources. A water mill could be viewed as the kernel of a new community or as a new way to exploit labor. If passengers comprehended railways as part of a larger narrative about American expansion and progress, many farmers attacked railroad land grants. To explore these contradictions, Nye devotes alternating chapters to narratives of second creation and to narratives of those who rejected it.Nye draws on popular literature, speeches, advertisements, paintings, and many other media to create a history of American foundation stories. He shows how these stories were revised periodically, as social and economic conditions changed, without ever erasing the earlier stories entirely. The image of the isolated frontier family carving a homestead out of the wilderness with an axe persists to this day, alongside later images and narratives. In the book's conclusion, Nye considers the relation between these earlier stories and such later American developments as the conservation movement, narratives of environmental recovery, and the idealization of wilderness.
Category: History

American Hegemony And The Postwar Reconstruction Of Science In Europe

Author : Krige
ISBN : 9780262263412
Genre : Science
File Size : 46.36 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 424
Read : 923

In 1945, the United States was not only the strongest economic and military power in the world; it was also the world's leader in science and technology. In American Hegemony and the Postwar Reconstruction of Science in Europe, John Krige describes the efforts of influential figures in the United States to model postwar scientific practices and institutions in Western Europe on those in America. They mobilized political and financial support to promote not just America's scientific and technological agendas in Western Europe but its Cold War political and ideological agendas as well.Drawing on the work of diplomatic and cultural historians, Krige argues that this attempt at scientific dominance by the United States can be seen as a form of "consensual hegemony," involving the collaboration of influential local elites who shared American values. He uses this notion to analyze a series of case studies that describe how the U.S. administration, senior officers in the Rockefeller and Ford Foundations, the NATO Science Committee, and influential members of the scientific establishment -- notably Isidor I. Rabi of Columbia University and Vannevar Bush of MIT -- tried to Americanize scientific practices in such fields as physics, molecular biology, and operations research. He details U.S. support for institutions including CERN, the Niels Bohr Institute, the French CNRS and its laboratories at Gif near Paris, and the never-established "European MIT." Krige's study shows how consensual hegemony in science not only served the interests of postwar European reconstruction but became another way of maintaining American leadership and "making the world safe for democracy."
Category: Science