NATIVE AMERICANS IN THE SUSQUEHANNA RIVER VALLEY PAST AND PRESENT

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Native Americans In The Susquehanna River Valley Past And Present

Author : David J. Minderhout
ISBN : 9781611484885
Genre : History
File Size : 90.58 MB
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This volume describes the Native American presence in the Susquehanna River Valley, a key crossroads of the old Eastern Woodlands between the Great Lakes and the Chesapeake Bay in Northern Appalachia.
Category: History

Peoples Of The River Valleys

Author : Amy C. Schutt
ISBN : 9780812203790
Genre : History
File Size : 48.73 MB
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Seventeenth-century Indians from the Delaware and lower Hudson valleys organized their lives around small-scale groupings of kin and communities. Living through epidemics, warfare, economic change, and physical dispossession, survivors from these peoples came together in new locations, especially the eighteenth-century Susquehanna and Ohio River valleys. In the process, they did not abandon kin and community orientations, but they increasingly defined a role for themselves as Delaware Indians in early American society. Peoples of the River Valleys offers a fresh interpretation of the history of the Delaware, or Lenape, Indians in the context of events in the mid-Atlantic region and the Ohio Valley. It focuses on a broad and significant period: 1609-1783, including the years of Dutch, Swedish, and English colonization and the American Revolution. An epilogue takes the Delawares' story into the mid-nineteenth century. Amy C. Schutt examines important themes in Native American history—mediation and alliance formation—and shows their crucial role in the development of the Delawares as a people. She goes beyond familiar questions about Indian-European relations and examines how Indian-Indian associations were a major factor in the history of the Delawares. Drawing extensively upon primary sources, including treaty minutes, deeds, and Moravian mission records, Schutt reveals that Delawares approached alliances as a tool for survival at a time when Euro-Americans were encroaching on Native lands. As relations with colonists were frequently troubled, Delawares often turned instead to form alliances with other Delawares and non-Delaware Indians with whom they shared territories and resources. In vivid detail, Peoples of the River Valleys shows the link between the Delawares' approaches to land and the relationships they constructed on the land.
Category: History

Invisible Indians

Author : David Jay Minderhout
ISBN : 1604975113
Genre : History
File Size : 75.92 MB
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Pennsylvania is one of the few states that neither contains a reservation nor officially recognizes any Native American group. The stance of state government is that there are no Native Americans in the state. However, there is a large and growing community of Native Americans that is growing more active and more frustrated with the state's position. Invisible Indians is based on three years of research with Native Americans in Pennsylvania. The authors have crossed the state to attend powwows and tribal meetings, as well as interview individual Indians. Based on several, extensive ethnographic interviews, this book provide an extremely insightful account of Native Americans in Pennsylvania. The book also examines the history of Native American/government relationships within the state, as well as critical issues such as casino gambling and state recognition that are the crux of current negotiations. The book is also about the ways Pennsylvania's Native Americans are reinventing their history and their cultures to meet their own social and psychological (identity) needs. This book is a much-needed addition to the literature on Native American identity today--the critical issue in contemporary Native American politics. The book also debunks the official state stance that no Native Americans exist in Pennsylvania. Invisible Indians will be a valuable reference both to social scientists interested in personal identity issues as well as all interested in Pennsylvania cultures and issues.
Category: History

The Indian Wars Of Pennsylvania

Author : C.H. Sipe
ISBN : 9785871748480
Genre : History
File Size : 25.78 MB
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The Indian wars of Pennsylvania an account of the Indian events, in Pennsylvania, of the French and Indian war, Pontiac's war, Lord Dunmore's war, the revolutionary war, and the Indian uprising from 1789 to 1795 tragedies of the Pennsylvania frontier.
Category: History

Indians In Pennsylvania

Author : Paula W. Wallace
ISBN : 1422314936
Genre :
File Size : 66.45 MB
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Since its original pub. in 1961, this book has been one of the best & most popular histories of the Indians of PA. This edition updates some factual content while retaining the author¿s original interpretation. The Delawares who were the Indians most closely associated with PA, called themselves ¿Lenni Lenape¿, which means the Real (or Original) People. Wallace discusses their origins, neighbors, physical appearance & dress, villages & houses, occupations, travel, warfare, gov¿t. & social org., life cycle, religion, & amusements; the Iroquois Confederacy; the Beaver Wars; Indian refugees in PA; the Shawnees; Indian land cessions & Delaware migrations; PA Indian policy & Indian wars; the Cornplanter Grant; & famous Indians of PA. Illustrations.
Category:

Coal Dust On Your Feet

Author : Janet MacGaffey
ISBN : 9781611485141
Genre : History
File Size : 35.5 MB
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Coal Dust on Your Feet is a historical ethnography covering a century and a half, looking at the lives and struggles of the immigrants who came to work in the Pennsylvania anthracite mines.
Category: History

Carlisle Indian Industrial School

Author : Jacqueline Fear-Segal
ISBN : 9780803295070
Genre : Education
File Size : 83.95 MB
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The Carlisle Indian School (1879-1918) was an audacious educational experiment. Capt. Richard Henry Pratt, the school's founder and first superintendent, persuaded the federal government that training Native children to accept the white man's ways and values would be more efficient than fighting deadly battles. The result was that the last Indian war would be waged against Native children in the classroom. More than 10,500 children from virtually every Native nation in the United States were taken from their homes and transported to Pennsylvania. Carlisle provided a blueprint for the federal Indian school system that was established across the United States and served as a model for many residential schools in Canada. The Carlisle experiment initiated patterns of dislocation and rupture far deeper and more profound and enduring than its initiators ever grasped. Carlisle Indian Industrial School offers varied perspectives on the school by interweaving the voices of students' descendants, poets, and activists with cutting-edge research by Native and non-Native scholars. These contributions reveal the continuing impact and vitality of historical and collective memory, as well as the complex and enduring legacies of a school that still touches the lives of many Native Americans.
Category: Education

In The Shadow Of Kinzua

Author : Laurence M. Hauptman
ISBN : 9780815652380
Genre : History
File Size : 75.43 MB
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Drawing on extensive federal, state, and tribal archival research, Hauptman explores the political background of the Kinzua dam while also providing a detailed, at times very personal account of the devastating impact the dam has had on the Seneca Nation and the resilience the tribe has shown in the face of this crisis.
Category: History

Lenape Country

Author : Jean R. Soderlund
ISBN : 9780812246476
Genre : History
File Size : 70.24 MB
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In 1631, when the Dutch tried to develop plantation agriculture in the Delaware Valley, the Lenape Indians destroyed the colony of Swanendael and killed its residents. The Natives and Dutch quickly negotiated peace, avoiding an extended war through diplomacy and trade. The Lenapes preserved their political sovereignty for the next fifty years as Dutch, Swedish, Finnish, and English colonists settled the Delaware Valley. The European outposts did not approach the size and strength of those in Virginia, New England, and New Netherland. Even after thousands of Quakers arrived in West New Jersey and Pennsylvania in the late 1670s and '80s, the region successfully avoided war for another seventy-five years. Lenape Country is a sweeping narrative history of the multiethnic society of the Delaware Valley in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. After Swanendael, the Natives, Swedes, and Finns avoided war by focusing on trade and forging strategic alliances in such events as the Dutch conquest, the Mercurius affair, the Long Swede conspiracy, and English attempts to seize land. Drawing on a wide range of sources, author Jean R. Soderlund demonstrates that the hallmarks of Delaware Valley society—commitment to personal freedom, religious liberty, peaceful resolution of conflict, and opposition to hierarchical government—began in the Delaware Valley not with Quaker ideals or the leadership of William Penn but with the Lenape Indians, whose culture played a key role in shaping Delaware Valley society. The first comprehensive account of the Lenape Indians and their encounters with European settlers before Pennsylvania's founding, Lenape Country places Native culture at the center of this part of North America.
Category: History

A Lenape Among The Quakers

Author : Dawn G. Marsh
ISBN : 9780803254183
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 77.65 MB
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On July 28, 1797, an elderly Lenape woman stood before the newly appointed almsman of Pennsylvania’s Chester County and delivered a brief account of her life. In a sad irony, Hannah Freeman was establishing her residency—a claim that paved the way for her removal to the poorhouse. Ultimately, however, it meant the final removal from the ancestral land she had so tenaciously maintained. Thus was William Penn’s “peaceable kingdom” preserved. A Lenape among the Quakers reconstructs Hannah Freeman’s history, traveling from the days of her grandmothers before European settlement to the beginning of the nineteenth century. The story that emerges is one of persistence and resilience, as “Indian Hannah” negotiates life with the Quaker neighbors who employ her, entrust their children to her, seek out her healing skills, and, when she is weakened by sickness and age, care for her. And yet these are the same neighbors whose families have dispossessed hers. Fascinating in its own right, Hannah Freeman’s life is also remarkable for its unique view of a Native American woman in a colonial community during a time of dramatic transformation and upheaval. In particular it expands our understanding of colonial history and the Native experience that history often renders silent.
Category: Social Science