MEXICO PROFUNDO RECLAIMING A CIVILIZATION

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M Xico Profundo

Author : Guillermo Bonfil Batalla
ISBN : 9780292791855
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 43.20 MB
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This translation of a major work in Mexican anthropology argues that Mesoamerican civilization is an ongoing and undeniable force in contemporary Mexican life. For Guillermo Bonfil Batalla, the remaining Indian communities, the "de-Indianized" rural mestizo communities, and vast sectors of the poor urban population constitute the México profundo. Their lives and ways of understanding the world continue to be rooted in Mesoamerican civilization. An ancient agricultural complex provides their food supply, and work is understood as a way of maintaining a harmonious relationship with the natural world. Health is related to human conduct, and community service is often part of each individual's life obligation. Time is circular, and humans fulfill their own cycle in relation to other cycles of the universe. Since the Conquest, Bonfil argues, the peoples of the México profundo have been dominated by an "imaginary México" imposed by the West. It is imaginary not because it does not exist, but because it denies the cultural reality lived daily by most Mexicans. Within the México profundo there exists an enormous body of accumulated knowledge, as well as successful patterns for living together and adapting to the natural world. To face the future successfully, argues Bonfil, Mexico must build on these strengths of Mesoamerican civilization, "one of the few original civilizations that humanity has created throughout all its history."
Category: Social Science

Naturalizing Mexican Immigrants

Author : Martha Menchaca
ISBN : 9780292745063
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 40.4 MB
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During the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, a majority of the Mexican immigrant population in the United States resided in Texas, making the state a flashpoint in debates over whether to deny naturalization rights. As Texas federal courts grappled with the issue, policies pertaining to Mexican immigrants came to reflect evolving political ideologies on both sides of the border. Drawing on unprecedented historical analysis of state archives, U.S. Congressional records, and other sources of overlooked data, Naturalizing Mexican Immigrants provides a rich understanding of the realities and rhetoric that have led to present-day immigration controversies. Martha Menchaca's groundbreaking research examines such facets as U.S.-Mexico relations following the U.S. Civil War and the schisms created by Mexican abolitionists; the anti-immigration stance that marked many suffragist appeals; the effects of the Spanish American War; distinctions made for mestizo, Afromexicano, and Native American populations; the erosion of means for U.S. citizens to legalize their relatives; and the ways in which U.S. corporations have caused the political conditions that stimulated emigration from Mexico. The first historical study of its kind, Naturalizing Mexican Immigrants delivers a clear-eyed view of provocative issues.
Category: Social Science

Crossing Currents

Author : Michael B. Whiteford
ISBN : 0136564712
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 47.48 MB
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Designed to expose readers to some of the most important critical thinking by anthropologists across a wide range of issues, this anthology combines a variety of works that examine Latin American cultures from a number of different perspectives. Very accessible and perceptive, it covers a wide range of topics -- beginning with a general overview of Latin America (observations about size of land mass, geography, population size and growth rates) and then highlighting some of the cultural characteristics that permit us to talk about "Latin America" -- balancing the incredible cultural diversity with some of the overriding features that give at least the appearance of "similarity."
Category: Social Science

Mexico

Author : Alicia Hernández Chávez
ISBN : 0520244915
Genre : History
File Size : 74.42 MB
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Looks at the history of Mexico, from its pre-Hispanic period until the present day.
Category: History

New Approaches To Resistance In Brazil And Mexico

Author : John Gledhill
ISBN : 9780822351870
Genre : History
File Size : 28.61 MB
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This edited collection by scholars of both history and anthropology re-examines the concepts of resistance and the effect of neoliberalism from the 1980s to the present day comparing Brazil and Mexico, two of the largest countries in Latin America.
Category: History

Consumers And Citizens

Author : Néstor García Canclini
ISBN : 0816629870
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 30.6 MB
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Nestor Garcia Canclini, the best-known and most innovative cultural studies scholar in Latin America, maps the critical effects of urban sprawl, global media, and commodity markets on citizens. The complex results mean not only a shrinkage of certain traditional rights (particularly those of the welfare or client state) but also indicate new openings for expanding citizenship.
Category: Social Science

Indigenous Mexican Migrants In The United States

Author : Jonathan Fox
ISBN : UTEXAS:059173016321857
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 76.31 MB
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The multiple pasts and futures of the Mexican nation can be seen in the faces of the tens of thousands of indigenous people who each year set out on their voyages to the north, as well as the many others who decide to settle in countless communities within the United States. To study indigenous Mexican migrants in the United States today requires a binational lens, taking into account basic changes in the way Mexican society is understood as the twenty-first century begins. This collection explores these migration processes and their social, cultural, and civic impacts in the United States and in Mexico. The studies come from diverse perspectives, but they share a concern with how sustained migration and the emergence of organizations of indigenous migrants influence social and community identity, both in the United States and in Mexico. These studies also focus on how the creation and re-creation of collective ethnic identities among indigenous migrants influences their economic, social, and political relationships in the United States. of California, Santa Cruz
Category: Social Science

Teaching Rebellion

Author : Diana Denham
ISBN : 9781604860320
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 81.28 MB
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A compilation of testimonies from longtime organisers, teachers, students, housewives, religious leaders, union members, schoolchildren, indigenous community activists, artists and journalists and many others who participated in what became the Popular Assembly for the Peoples of Oaxaca. A chance for readers to discover what became one of the most important social uprisings of the 21st century.
Category: Political Science

Foreigners In Their Native Land

Author : David J. Weber
ISBN : 0826335101
Genre : History
File Size : 51.85 MB
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Most recent writing about Mexican Americans deals only with the twentieth century. This book provides the much-needed historical perspective that is essential for a full understanding of the present. Dozens of selections from firsthand accounts, introduced by the editor's knowledgeable essays capture the flavor and mood of the Mexican American experience in the Southwest from the time the first pioneers came north from Mexico. The first edition was selected as aChoice"Outstanding Academic Book of the Year" and received the following accolades: "An excellent job of illuminating the early historical experience of Mexicans living in the United States."--Western Historical Quarterly "Weber . . . has done more than compile a first-rate anthology . . . he has done much to put the selected accounts into a meaningful historical framework. This coupled with excellent documentary choices and extensive notes makes it the single best volume for understanding the Mexican American experience in the nineteenth-century Southwest."--Choice
Category: History

Indigeneity In The Mexican Cultural Imagination

Author : Analisa Taylor
ISBN : 0816527180
Genre : History
File Size : 63.69 MB
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Since the end of the Mexican Revolution in 1917, the state has engaged in vigorous campaign to forge a unified national identity. Within the context of this effort, Indians are at once both denigrated and romanticized. Often marginalized, they are nonetheless subjects of constant national interest. Contradictory policies highlighting segregation, assimilation, modernization, and cultural preservation have alternately included and excluded MexicoÕs indigenous population from the stateÕs self-conscious efforts to shape its identity. Yet, until now, no single book has combined the various elements of this process to provide a comprehensive look at the Indian in MexicoÕs cultural imagination. Indigeneity in the Mexican Cultural Imagination offers a much-needed examination of this fickle relationship as it is seen through literature, ethnography, film and art. The book focuses on representations of indigenous peoples in post-revolutionary literary and intellectual history by examining key cultural texts. Using these analyses as a foundation, Analisa Taylor links her critique to national Indian policy, rights, and recent social movements in Southern Mexico. In addition, she moves beyond her analysis of indigenous peoples in general to take a gendered look at indigenous women ranging from the villainized Malinche to the highly romanticized and sexualized Zapotec women of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec. The contradictory treatment of the Indian in MexicoÕs cultural imagination is not unique to that country alone. Rather, the situation there is representative of a phenomenon seen throughout the world. Though this book addresses indigeneity in Mexico specifically, it has far-reaching implications for the study of indigenaety across Latin America and beyond. Much like the late Edward SaidÕs Orientalism, this book provides a glimpse at the very real effects of literary and intellectual discourse on those living in the margins of society. This bookÕs interdisciplinary approach makes it an essential foundation for research in the fields of anthropology, history, literary critique, sociology, and cultural studies. While the book is ideal for a scholarly audience, the accessible writing and scope of the analysis make it of interest to lay audiences as well. It is a must-read for anyone seeking a deeper understanding of the politics of indigeneity in Mexico and beyond.
Category: History