MAKING THE MEXICAN DIABETIC RACE SCIENCE AND THE GENETICS OF INEQUALITY

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Making The Mexican Diabetic

Author : Michael Montoya
ISBN : 9780520949003
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 54.76 MB
Format : PDF
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This innovative ethnographic study animates the racial politics that underlie genomic research into type 2 diabetes, one of the most widespread chronic diseases and one that affects ethnic groups disproportionately. Michael J. Montoya follows blood donations from "Mexican-American" donors to laboratories that are searching out genetic contributions to diabetes. His analysis lays bare the politics and ethics of the research process, addressing the implicit contradiction of undertaking genetic research that reinscribes race’s importance even as it is being demonstrated to have little scientific validity. In placing DNA sampling, processing, data set sharing, and carefully crafted science into a broader social context, Making the Mexican Diabetic underscores the implications of geneticizing disease while illuminating the significance of type 2 diabetes research in American life.
Category: Social Science

Making The Mexican Diabetic

Author : Michael Montoya
ISBN : 9780520267312
Genre : Medical
File Size : 75.51 MB
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“Making the Mexican Diabetic presents a finely-honed ethnography. Montoya is particularly attuned to the sensitivity and conundrums surrounding the use of DNA drawn from a population at high risk of diabetes, and he makes a strong case for understanding the rational value behind this approach as well as its potential reinforcement of racial stereotypes. This is a unique and important book.”- Rayna Rapp, author of Testing Women, Testing the Fetus: The Social Impact of Amniocentesis in America "This is a fascinating, broad-ranging, and fair-minded ethnography. In the best tradition of science studies, Montoya takes the scientific research seriously on its own terms. Yet he always brings us back to the sociopolitical context, including the tremendous conditions of inequality that Mexican immigrants encounter in the United States.” -Steven Epstein, Northwestern University
Category: Medical

Making The Mexican Diabetic

Author : Michael Montoya
ISBN : 9780520267305
Genre : Medical
File Size : 46.12 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 540
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“Making the Mexican Diabetic presents a finely-honed ethnography. Montoya is particularly attuned to the sensitivity and conundrums surrounding the use of DNA drawn from a population at high risk of diabetes, and he makes a strong case for understanding the rational value behind this approach as well as its potential reinforcement of racial stereotypes. This is a unique and important book.”- Rayna Rapp, author of Testing Women, Testing the Fetus: The Social Impact of Amniocentesis in America "This is a fascinating, broad-ranging, and fair-minded ethnography. In the best tradition of science studies, Montoya takes the scientific research seriously on its own terms. Yet he always brings us back to the sociopolitical context, including the tremendous conditions of inequality that Mexican immigrants encounter in the United States.” -Steven Epstein, Northwestern University
Category: Medical

Race In A Bottle

Author : Jonathan Kahn
ISBN : 9780231162982
Genre : Medical
File Size : 23.16 MB
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Approved by the FDA in 2005 as the first drug with a race-specific indication on its label, BiDil was touted as a pathbreaking therapy to treat heart failure in black patients. Kahn reveals that, at the most basic level, BiDil became racial through legal maneuvering and commercial pressure as much as through medical understandings of how the drug worked. He examines the legal and calls for a more reasoned approach to using race in biomedical research and practice.
Category: Medical

People S Science

Author : Ruha Benjamin
ISBN : 9780804786737
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 69.16 MB
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Stem cell research has sparked controversy and heated debate since the first human stem cell line was derived in 1998. Too frequently these debates devolve to simple judgments—good or bad, life-saving medicine or bioethical nightmare, symbol of human ingenuity or our fall from grace—ignoring the people affected. With this book, Ruha Benjamin moves the terms of debate to focus on the shifting relationship between science and society, on the people who benefit—or don't—from regenerative medicine and what this says about our democratic commitments to an equitable society. People's Science uncovers the tension between scientific innovation and social equality, taking the reader inside California's 2004 stem cell initiative, the first of many state referenda on scientific research, to consider the lives it has affected. Benjamin reveals the promise and peril of public participation in science, illuminating issues of race, disability, gender, and socio-economic class that serve to define certain groups as more or less deserving in their political aims and biomedical hopes. Under the shadow of the free market and in a nation still at odds with universal healthcare, the socially marginalized are often eagerly embraced as test-subjects, yet often are unable to afford new medicines and treatment regimes as patients. Ultimately, Ruha Benjamin argues that without more deliberate consideration about how scientific initiatives can and should reflect a wider array of social concerns, stem cell research— from African Americans' struggle with sickle cell treatment to the recruitment of women as tissue donors—still risks excluding many. Even as regenerative medicine is described as a participatory science for the people, Benjamin asks us to consider if "the people" ultimately reflects our democratic ideals.
Category: Social Science

Dying In The City Of The Blues

Author : Keith Wailoo
ISBN : 9781469617411
Genre : Medical
File Size : 35.75 MB
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This groundbreaking book chronicles the history of sickle cell anemia in the United States, tracing its transformation from an "invisible" malady to a powerful, yet contested, cultural symbol of African American pain and suffering. Set in Memphis, home of one of the nation's first sickle cell clinics, Dying in the City of the Blues reveals how the recognition, treatment, social understanding, and symbolism of the disease evolved in the twentieth century, shaped by the politics of race, region, health care, and biomedicine. Using medical journals, patients' accounts, black newspapers, blues lyrics, and many other sources, Keith Wailoo follows the disease and its sufferers from the early days of obscurity before sickle cell's "discovery" by Western medicine; through its rise to clinical, scientific, and social prominence in the 1950s; to its politicization in the 1970s and 1980s. Looking forward, he considers the consequences of managed care on the politics of disease in the twenty-first century. A rich and multilayered narrative, Dying in the City of the Blues offers valuable new insight into the African American experience, the impact of race relations and ideologies on health care, and the politics of science, medicine, and disease.
Category: Medical

How Cancer Crossed The Color Line

Author : Keith Wailoo
ISBN : 0195170172
Genre : History
File Size : 76.67 MB
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In the course of the 20th century, cancer went from being perceived as a white woman's nemesis to a "democratic disease" to a fearsome threat in communities of color. Drawing on film and fiction, on medical and epidemiological evidence, and on patients' accounts, Keith Wailoo tracks this transformation in cancer awareness, revealing how not only awareness, but cancer prevention, treatment, and survival have all been refracted through the lens of race.Spanning more than a century, the book offers a sweeping account of the forces that simultaneously defined cancer as an intensely individualized and personal experience linked to whites, often categorizing people across the color line as racial types lacking similar personal dimensions. Wailoo describes how theories of risk evolved with changes in women's roles, with African-American and new immigrant migration trends, with the growth of federal cancer surveillance, and with diagnostic advances, racial protest, and contemporary health activism. The book examines such powerful and transformative social developments as the mass black migration from rural south to urban north in the 1920s and 1930s, the World War II experience at home and on the war front, and the quest for civil rights and equality in health in the 1950s and '60s. It also explores recent controversies that illuminate the diversity of cancer challenges in America, such as the high cancer rates among privileged women in Marin County, California, the heavy toll of prostate cancer among black men, and the questions about why Vietnamese-American women's cervical cancer rates are so high.A pioneering study, How Cancer Crossed the Color Line gracefully documents how race and gender became central motifs in the birth of cancer awareness, how patterns and perceptions changed over time, and how the "war on cancer" continues to be waged along the color line.
Category: History

Misbehaving Science

Author : Aaron Panofsky
ISBN : 9780226058597
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 39.51 MB
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Behavior genetics has always been a breeding ground for controversies. From the “criminal chromosome” to the “gay gene,” claims about the influence of genes like these have led to often vitriolic national debates about race, class, and inequality. Many behavior geneticists have encountered accusations of racism and have had their scientific authority and credibility questioned, ruining reputations, and threatening their access to coveted resources. In Misbehaving Science, Aaron Panofsky traces the field of behavior genetics back to its origins in the 1950s, telling the story through close looks at five major controversies. In the process, Panofsky argues that persistent, ungovernable controversy in behavior genetics is due to the broken hierarchies within the field. All authority and scientific norms are questioned, while the absence of unanimously accepted methods and theories leaves a foundationless field, where disorder is ongoing. Critics charge behavior geneticists with political motivations; champions say they merely follow the data where they lead. But Panofsky shows how pragmatic coping with repeated controversies drives their scientific actions. Ironically, behavior geneticists’ struggles for scientific authority and efforts to deal with the threats to their legitimacy and autonomy have made controversy inevitable—and in some ways essential—to the study of behavior genetics.
Category: Social Science

Doing Style

Author : Constantine V. Nakassis
ISBN : 9780226327853
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 25.18 MB
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Doing style -- Brand and brandedness -- Brandedness and the production of surfeit -- Style and the threshold of English -- Bringing the distant voice close -- College heroes and film stars -- Status through the screen -- Media's entanglements
Category: Social Science