MAKING DIPLOMACY WORK INTELLIGENT INNOVATION FOR THE MODERN WORLD

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Making Diplomacy Work

Author : Paul Webster Hare
ISBN : 145227648X
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 52.4 MB
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Making Diplomacy Work: Intelligent Innovation for the Modern World promises to take a fresh look at the actual practice of diplomacy, setting diplomacy in its contemporary context and analyzing the major factors that have changed the nature of the intelligent conduct of diplomacy. Unlike other books on the market which are written by academics, Making Diplomacy Work is written from the vantage point of someone who not only knows and teaches about the scholarly underpinnings of diplomacy, but who has lived that experience himself. Ambassador Hare provides a thorough, critical survey of how diplomacy has evolved, the way its institutions have been created, and, crucially, new challenges to its operations. It examines not just the fundamentals -- state to state relations, negotiation, and key diplomatic institutions -- but also considers the role of non-state actors, the impact of modern communications technologies, the effect of transnational issues, and globalized international business practices. Bringing diplomacy to life for students, every chapter of the book is full of many real world examples from contemporary diplomacy, including events from the author's own experience. Chapters also feature extended case studies, covering topics like diplomatic immunity and privileges, the achievements and failures of institutions like the UN, successes and failures in diplomatic negotiations, the effectiveness of international law and its impact on diplomacy, and more.
Category: Political Science

Making Diplomacy Work

Author : Paul Webster Hare
ISBN : 9781483324388
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 49.88 MB
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Making Diplomacy Work: Intelligent Innovation for the Modern World takes a fresh look at the practice of diplomacy, setting it in its contemporary context and analyzing the major factors that have changed the nature of the way it is conducted. The book is built on the premise that diplomacy must adapt some of its ritualistic and stale procedures to become more effective in the modern world. It provides a thorough examination of current issues from a diplomatic perspective and offers an extensive array of real-world examples. Author Paul Webster Hare brings 30 years of diplomacy experience to this title; it is a must-have volume for any student of diplomacy.
Category: Political Science

Five Rising Democracies

Author : Ted Piccone
ISBN : 9780815725787
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 27.70 MB
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Shifting power balances in the world are shaking the foundations of the liberal international order and revealing new fault lines at the intersection of human rights and international security. Will these new global trends help or hinder the world's long struggle for human rights and democracy? The answer depends on the role of five rising democracies—India, Brazil, South Africa, Turkey, and Indonesia—as both examples and supporters of liberal ideas and practices. Ted Piccone analyzes the transitions of these five democracies as their stars rise on the international stage. While they offer important and mainly positive examples of the compatibility of political liberties, economic growth, and human development, their foreign policies swing between interest-based strategic autonomy and a principled concern for democratic progress and human rights. In a multipolar world, the fate of the liberal international order depends on how they reconcile these tendencies.
Category: Political Science

Genghis Khan And The Making Of The Modern World

Author : Jack Weatherford
ISBN : 9780307237811
Genre : History
File Size : 84.91 MB
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The name Genghis Khan often conjures the image of a relentless, bloodthirsty barbarian on horseback leading a ruthless band of nomadic warriors in the looting of the civilized world. But the surprising truth is that Genghis Khan was a visionary leader whose conquests joined backward Europe with the flourishing cultures of Asia to trigger a global awakening, an unprecedented explosion of technologies, trade, and ideas. In Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World, Jack Weatherford, the only Western scholar ever to be allowed into the Mongols’ “Great Taboo”—Genghis Khan’s homeland and forbidden burial site—tracks the astonishing story of Genghis Khan and his descendants, and their conquest and transformation of the world. Fighting his way to power on the remote steppes of Mongolia, Genghis Khan developed revolutionary military strategies and weaponry that emphasized rapid attack and siege warfare, which he then brilliantly used to overwhelm opposing armies in Asia, break the back of the Islamic world, and render the armored knights of Europe obsolete. Under Genghis Khan, the Mongol army never numbered more than 100,000 warriors, yet it subjugated more lands and people in twenty-five years than the Romans conquered in four hundred. With an empire that stretched from Siberia to India, from Vietnam to Hungary, and from Korea to the Balkans, the Mongols dramatically redrew the map of the globe, connecting disparate kingdoms into a new world order. But contrary to popular wisdom, Weatherford reveals that the Mongols were not just masters of conquest, but possessed a genius for progressive and benevolent rule. On every level and from any perspective, the scale and scope of Genghis Khan’s accomplishments challenge the limits of imagination. Genghis Khan was an innovative leader, the first ruler in many conquered countries to put the power of law above his own power, encourage religious freedom, create public schools, grant diplomatic immunity, abolish torture, and institute free trade. The trade routes he created became lucrative pathways for commerce, but also for ideas, technologies, and expertise that transformed the way people lived. The Mongols introduced the first international paper currency and postal system and developed and spread revolutionary technologies like printing, the cannon, compass, and abacus. They took local foods and products like lemons, carrots, noodles, tea, rugs, playing cards, and pants and turned them into staples of life around the world. The Mongols were the architects of a new way of life at a pivotal time in history. In Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World, Jack Weatherford resurrects the true history of Genghis Khan, from the story of his relentless rise through Mongol tribal culture to the waging of his devastatingly successful wars and the explosion of civilization that the Mongol Empire unleashed. This dazzling work of revisionist history doesn’t just paint an unprecedented portrait of a great leader and his legacy, but challenges us to reconsider how the modern world was made. From the Hardcover edition.
Category: History

Moncada

Author : PAUL WEBSTER HARE
ISBN : 9781450203654
Genre : Fiction
File Size : 50.90 MB
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Moncada is one of the first words young Cuban biologist Felipe Triana learned as he was growing up. He was taught to say the word, and he was told that it was not just for him, but for every Cuban. Felipe, like many of the other young Cubans, has known nothing but the fifty-year-old revolution which still controls their lives but offers them less and less. An unconventional diplomatic story, Moncada follows the lives of Felipe and six other ordinary Cubans in the week leading up to the major revolutionary festival of Moncada that’s celebrated on July 26. As the day of the festivities draws near, Felipe examines the course of his life in this country. From the economy, to the living conditions, baseball, popular Cuban culture, and the history of the revolution, Moncada presents the essence of present-day Cuba through the eyes of those living there. It gives flavor to a country whose people are deprived of expressing themselves.
Category: Fiction

Great Negotiations

Author : Fredrik Stanton
ISBN : STANFORD:36105215464830
Genre : History
File Size : 61.94 MB
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Words as much as weapons have shaped the course of history. Learn about eight key episodes in modern diplomacy, from Benjamin Franklin securing crucial French support for the American revolution to Reagan and Gorbachev laking the groundwork to eliminate an entire class of nuclear weapons.
Category: History

Amarna Diplomacy

Author : Raymond Cohen
ISBN : 0801871034
Genre : History
File Size : 32.45 MB
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"This is an important volume for any scholar of the ancient Near East." -- Religious Studies Review
Category: History

Plunging Into Haiti

Author : Ralph Pezzullo
ISBN : 1604735341
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 44.4 MB
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For much of the early 1990s, Haiti held the world's attention. A fiery populist priest, Jean Bertrand Aristide, was elected president and deposed a year later in a military coup. Soon thousands of desperately poor Haitians started to arrive in makeshift boats on the shores of Florida. In early 1993, the newly elected Clinton administration pledged to make the restoration of President Aristide one of the cornerstones of its foreign policy. But that fall the U.S. let supporters of Haiti's ruling military junta intimidate America into ordering the USS Harlan County and its cargo of UN peacekeeping troops to scotch plans and return to port. Less than a year later, for the first time in U.S. history, a deposed president of another country prevailed on the United States to use its military might to return him to office. These extraordinary events provide the backdrop for Plunging into Haiti: Clinton, Aristide, and the Defeat of Diplomacy mdash;Ralph Pezzullo's detailed account of the international diplomatic effort to resolve the political crisis.
Category: Political Science

Making Conflict Work

Author : Peter T. Coleman
ISBN : 9780544149144
Genre : Business & Economics
File Size : 38.45 MB
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“An excellent workbook-like guide” to the nuts and bolts of professional conflict and the strategies you need to make conflict work for you (Booklist, starred review). Every workplace is a minefield of conflict, and all office tension is shaped by power. Making Conflict Work teaches you to identify the nature of a conflict, determine your power position relative to anyone opposing you, and use the best strategy for achieving your goals. These strategies are equally effective for executives, managers and their direct reports, consultants, and attorneys—anyone who has ever had a disagreement with someone in their organization. Packed with helpful self-assessment exercises and action plans, this book gives you the tools you need to achieve greater satisfaction and success. “A genuine winner.” —Robert B. Cialdini, author of Influence “This book is a necessity . . . Read it.” —Leymah Gbowee, 2011 Nobel Peace Prize laureate and Liberian peace activist “Innovative and practical.” —Lawrence Susskind, Program on Negotiation cofounder “Navigating conflict effectively is an essential component of leadership. Making Conflict Work illustrates when to compromise and when to continue driving forward.” —Hon. David N. Dinkins, 106th mayor of the City of New York “An excellent workbook-like guide.” —Booklist, starred review
Category: Business & Economics

Desert Borderland

Author : Matthew H. Ellis
ISBN : 9781503605572
Genre : History
File Size : 62.80 MB
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Desert Borderland investigates the historical processes that transformed political identity in the easternmost reaches of the Sahara Desert in the half century before World War I. Adopting a view from the margins—illuminating the little-known history of the Egyptian–Libyan borderland—the book challenges prevailing notions of how Egypt and Libya were constituted as modern territorial nation-states. Matthew H. Ellis draws on a wide array of archival sources to reconstruct the multiple layers and meanings of territoriality in this desert borderland. Throughout the decades, a heightened awareness of the existence of distinctive Egyptian and Ottoman Libyan territorial spheres began to develop despite any clear-cut boundary markers or cartographic evidence. National territoriality was not simply imposed on Egypt's western—or Ottoman Libya's eastern—domains by centralizing state power. Rather, it developed only through a complex and multilayered process of negotiation with local groups motivated by their own local conceptions of space, sovereignty, and political belonging. By the early twentieth century, distinctive "Egyptian" and "Libyan" territorial domains emerged—what would ultimately become the modern nation-states of Egypt and Libya.
Category: History