MAIZE FOR THE GODS UNEARTHING THE 9000 YEAR HISTORY OF CORN

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Maize For The Gods

Author : Michael Blake
ISBN : 9780520961692
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 88.40 MB
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Maize is the world’s most productive food and industrial crop, grown in more than 160 countries and on every continent except Antarctica. If by some catastrophe maize were to disappear from our food supply chain, vast numbers of people would starve and global economies would rapidly collapse. How did we come to be so dependent on this one plant? Maize for the Gods brings together new research by archaeologists, archaeobotanists, plant geneticists, and a host of other specialists to explore the complex ways that this single plant and the peoples who domesticated it came to be inextricably entangled with one another over the past nine millennia. Tracing maize from its first appearance and domestication in ancient campsites and settlements in Mexico to its intercontinental journey through most of North and South America, this history also tells the story of the artistic creativity, technological prowess, and social, political, and economic resilience of America’s first peoples.
Category: Social Science

Beautiful Corn

Author : Anthony Boutard
ISBN : 9780865717282
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 45.29 MB
Format : PDF
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FROM SEED TO PLATE - THE SEASONS OF A REMARKABLE CROP "Part love song to an ancient grain, part elevated instruction on how to grow, cook and consume it, part history and animated story, Beautiful Corn opens our eyes to a food plant that humans have both cultivated and been cultivated by." ---Michael Ableman, farmer, author of "From The Good Earth, On Good Land, and Fields Of Plenty" Corn is the grain of the Americas. In terms of culinary uses, it is amazingly diverse, reflecting the breathtaking variety of the continents and environments from which it evolved. The consummate immigrant, corn is grown extensively on every continent except Antarctica. Much more than a simple how-to book, "Beautiful Corn" weaves together this unique plant's contribution to our culture, its distinctive biology and the practical information needed to grow and enjoy it at home. Market farmer and naturalist Anthony Boutard advocates a return to this traditional, nourishing and beautiful whole grain, in all of its rich diversity. Come along on this lyrical and inspiring journey through the seasons, and discover the pure joy of restoring heritage corn varieties to our tables. An unabashed celebration of a much-maligned culinary treasure, Beautiful Corn will forever change the way you view this remarkable plant. "Anthony Boutard tells a story of corn we haven't heard--not as fuel, or livestock feed, or food product--but as whole food, with the flavor and diversity that comes with thoughtful farming. Part history, part how-to manual (Boutard grows, grinds and cooks corn in all its variations), "Beautiful Corn" returns the culture, and the cuisine, to our most abundant and mistreated crop."---Dan Barber, Chef / Co-Owner, Blue Hill and Blue Hill at Stone Barns "In this lyrical love letter to an ancient, fascinating food, Anthony Boutard offers us a rich harvest of history, a primer on growing the best varieties, the close observations of a brilliant, insatiably curious farmer, and some tasty recipes to boot."--Lorna Sass, author of the James Beard Award winning "Whole Grains Every Day, Every Way" Anthony Boutard is a widely recognized advocate in the local food movement, well-known for his efforts in reviving long-lost crops and bringing little-known varieties to market. He and his wife Carol own Ayers Creek Farm, a 144-acre organic market farm in Gaston, Oregon specializing in berries, beans, grains and greens for sale to local restaurants and markets.
Category: Social Science

Maize

Author : Duccio Bonavia
ISBN : 9781139619943
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 43.48 MB
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This book examines one of the thorniest problems of ancient American archaeology: the origins and domestication of maize. Using a variety of scientific techniques, Duccio Bonavia explores the development of maize, its adaptation to varying climates and its fundamental role in ancient American cultures. An appendix (by Alexander Grobman) provides the first-ever comprehensive compilation of maize genetic data, correlating this data with the archaeological evidence presented throughout the book. This book provides a unique interpretation of questions of dating and evolution, supported by extensive data, following the spread of maize from South to North America and eventually to Europe and beyond.
Category: Social Science

Corn Capitalism

Author : Arturo Warman
ISBN : 0807854379
Genre : History
File Size : 64.70 MB
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Exploring the history and importance of corn worldwide, Arturo Warman traces its development from a New World food of poor and despised peoples into a commodity that plays a major role in the modern global economy. The book, first published in Mexico i
Category: History

Midwest Maize

Author : Cynthia Clampitt
ISBN : 9780252096877
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 26.56 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
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Food historian Cynthia Clampitt pens the epic story of what happened when Mesoamerican farmers bred a nondescript grass into a staff of life so prolific, so protean, that it represents nothing less than one of humankind's greatest achievements. Blending history with expert reportage, she traces the disparate threads that have woven corn into the fabric of our diet, politics, economy, science, and cuisine. At the same time she explores its future as a source of energy and the foundation of seemingly limitless green technologies. The result is a bourbon-to-biofuels portrait of the astonishing plant that sustains the world.
Category: Social Science

Bread Beer And The Seeds Of Change

Author : Thomas R. Sinclair
ISBN : 9781845937058
Genre : Technology & Engineering
File Size : 47.65 MB
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The history of humankind is intimately tied to the history of agriculture: powerful societies rose, persisted and waned in parallel with their food supply systems. Describing what crops were grown, the constraints on their production and the foods that were obtained, this book traces the impact of cropping and food preparation in ten societies that were among the most powerful and influential in history, detailing how technology varied and developed as it related directly to agriculture and food production. The book initially considers growing and eating grains beginning with the transition from hunter-gatherers to agrarian communities. Five early agricultural societies are examined, followed by the advancement of technology from the ancient Greeks and Romans to the present. It concludes by addressing the implications for the future of agriculture and food supply as grain production moves towards biofuels. A compelling text for all those interested in the history of society and --
Category: Technology & Engineering

Tomatoes Potatoes Corn And Beans

Author : Sylvia A. Johnson
ISBN : UOM:49015002674076
Genre : Juvenile Fiction
File Size : 69.38 MB
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Describes many foods native to the Americas, including corn, peppers, peanuts, and chocolate, which were taken to Europe and used in new ways around the world.
Category: Juvenile Fiction

Land Of The Cosmic Race

Author : Christina A. Sue
ISBN : 9780199925506
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 76.67 MB
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Land of the Cosmic Race is a richly-detailed ethnographic account of the powerful role that race and color play in organizing the lives and thoughts of ordinary Mexicans. It presents a previously untold story of how individuals in contemporary urban Mexico construct their identities, attitudes, and practices in the context of a dominant national belief system. The book centers around Mexicans' engagement with three racialized pillars of Mexican national ideology - the promotion of race mixture, the assertion of an absence of racism in the country, and the marginalization of blackness in Mexico. The subjects of this book are mestizos - the mixed-race people of Mexico who are of Indigenous, African, and European ancestry and the intended consumers of this national ideology. Land of the Cosmic Race illustrates how Mexican mestizos navigate the sea of contradictions that arise when their everyday lived experiences conflict with the national stance and how they manage these paradoxes in a way that upholds, protects, and reproduces the national ideology. Drawing on a year of participant observation, over 110 interviews, and focus-groups from Veracruz, Mexico, Christina A. Sue offers rich insight into the relationship between race-based national ideology and the attitudes and behaviors of mixed-race Mexicans. Most importantly, she theorizes as to why elite-based ideology not only survives but actually thrives within the popular understandings and discourse of those over whom it is designed to govern.
Category: Social Science

Food And Identity In The Caribbean

Author : Hanna Garth
ISBN : 9780857853585
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 50.67 MB
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This compelling collection of original essays explores food and identity in the Caribbean, focusing on contemporary political and economic changes which impact upon culinary identities.
Category: Social Science

Feeding The City

Author : Richard Graham
ISBN : 9780292779068
Genre : History
File Size : 84.88 MB
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On the eastern coast of Brazil, facing westward across a wide magnificent bay, lies Salvador, a major city in the Americas at the end of the eighteenth century. Those who distributed and sold food, from the poorest street vendors to the most prosperous traders—black and white, male and female, slave and free, Brazilian, Portuguese, and African—were connected in tangled ways to each other and to practically everyone else in the city, and are the subjects of this book. Food traders formed the city's most dynamic social component during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, constantly negotiating their social place. The boatmen who brought food to the city from across the bay decisively influenced the outcome of the war for Brazilian independence from Portugal by supplying the insurgents and not the colonial army. Richard Graham here shows for the first time that, far from being a city sharply and principally divided into two groups—the rich and powerful or the hapless poor or enslaved—Salvador had a population that included a great many who lived in between and moved up and down. The day-to-day behavior of those engaged in food marketing leads to questions about the government's role in regulating the economy and thus to notions of justice and equity, questions that directly affected both food traders and the wider consuming public. Their voices significantly shaped the debate still going on between those who support economic liberalization and those who resist it.
Category: History